Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
public class MyClass: AbstractBase
{
    public override bool Init(IAppContext contextIn)
    {
        if (base.Init(contextIn))
        {
            //my code 
        }
    }
}

I have a class as given above and wanted to write a unit test for the Init method and have mocked the IAppContext. How can I use mock to bypass the call to base?

This is what i am doing:

Mock<IAppContext> mockContex = new Mock<IAppContext >();
MyClass myClassInstance - new MyClass ();
myClassInstance.Init(mockContex.object);

The base.init looks like:

public virtual bool Init(IAppContext context_in) 
{
    if (context_in == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("context_in", "IAppContext argument s null"); 
    } 
    this.myCommunication = context_in.getInterface<ICommunication>();
    if (this.myCommunication == null)
    { 
        throw new ArgumentNullException("myCommunication", "ICommunication argument is null");
    } 
    this.myStateManager = new IStateManager(this.myCommunication);
    if (this.myStateManager == null)
    { 
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Could not create the State Manager");
    }
    return true; 
} 
share|improve this question
    
You cannot bypass the call to base with Moq. What you can do is to setup mockContex in a way that base.Init(contextIn) returns true. Can you post how is the base.Init looks like? –  nemesv May 9 '12 at 5:16
    
public virtual bool Init(IAppContext context_in) { if (context_in == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException("context_in", (IAppContext argument s null"); } this.myCommunication = context_in.getInterface<ICommunication>(); if (this.myCommunication == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException("myCommunication", "ICommunication argument is null"); } this.myStateManager = new IStateManager(this.myCommunication); if (this.myStateManager == null) { throw new InvalidOperationException("Could not create the State Manager"); } return true; } } –  Somaraj Konattu May 9 '12 at 6:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can setup your IAppContext mock in a way that base.Init will return true:

var communicationFake = new Mock<ICommunication>();
var appContextMock = new Mock<IAppContext>();

appContextMock
    .Setup(c => c.getInterface<ICommunication>())
    .Returns(communicationFake.Object);

Now base.Init will return true when called with appContextMock.

Note that you don't need your last null check (this.myStateManager == null) - the only way for new IStateManager(this.myCommunication) to fail, is to throw exception. If it does, it won't get to null check part anyways.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.