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I have several different 'types' of incoming events, and I want to dispatch them to different IObservables, exposed as properties, but without subscribing multiple times to the underlying UDP.

public IObservable<TimeEvent> TimeEventChannel { get; private set; }
public IObservable<SpaceEvent> SpaceEventChannel { get; private set; }

Subject<TimeEvent> _TimeSubject = new Subject<TimeEvent>();
Subject<SpaceEvent> _SpaceSubject = new Subject<SpaceEvent>();

public EventDispatcher(IChannelListener listener)
{
    TimeEventChannel = _TimeSubject;
    SpaceEventChannel = _SpaceSubject;
    listener.Data.Subscribe(SwitchEvent);
}

private void SwitchEvent(AbstractEvent e)
{
    switch(e.EventType)
    {
        case EEventType.Time: _TimeSubject.OnNext(e as TimeEvent); break;
        case EEventType.Space: _SpaceSubject.OnNext(e as SpaceEvent); break;
    }
}

(listener.Data is an IObservable<AbstractEvent>).

The problem I'm having is trying to work out how to test this in isolation (without hooking up to UDP)

var spaceEvent = new SpaceEvent();
var udpSubject = new Subject<AbstractEvent>();
var mock = new Mock<IChannelListener>();
mock.SetupGet(listener => listener.Data).Returns(udpSubject);
var dispatcher = new EventDispatcher(mock.Object);

subject.OnNext(spaceEvent);
var result = dispatcher.SpaceEventChannel.SingleOrDefault();

As it stands, the test blocks on the last line, and I'm pretty sure it's because there's something I've fundamentally not grokked about how Subject works.

Question: What am I thinking wrong? How should I go about testing this particular use case? Am I implementing the Dispatcher backwards too?


Just in case, this is what the real ChannelListener currently looks like:

public ChannelListener(UdpClient udpClient, FrameInterpreter frameInterpreter)
{
    Data = Observable.Defer(() => 
    {
        IPEndPoint ep = null;
        return Observable.FromAsyncPattern<byte[]>(
                    udpClient.BeginReceive,
                    i => udpClient.EndReceive(i, ref ep)
                )()
                .Select(bytes => frameInterpreter.ParseFrame(bytes));
    });
}

public IObservable<AbstractEvent> Data { get; private set; }
share|improve this question
    
Is this line mock.SetupGet(listener => listener.Data).Returns(subject); meant to actually use udpSubject at the end there? –  yamen May 9 '12 at 6:59
    
@yamen, well spotted. An artefact of trying to create a sscce... –  Benjol May 9 '12 at 7:23
    
Which is really the most noble reason for any mistake on SO! –  yamen May 9 '12 at 7:26
    
Not sure it applies to your situation, but have you considered using the testing framework in Microsoft.Reactive.Testing? It allows you to virtualize time and do assertions on observable sequences. –  Martin Liversage May 9 '12 at 8:14
    
@MartinLiversage, yeah, I'm vaguely aware that it exists. I watched the video with Wes and Bart (IIRC) months ago and had my brains duly scrambled :) –  Benjol May 9 '12 at 8:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the problem is in the lines:

subject.OnNext(spaceEvent);
var result = dispatcher.SpaceEventChannel.SingleOrDefault();

Try replacing it with:

AbstractEvent result = null;
dispatcher.SpaceEventChannels.Subscribe(e => result = e);
subject.OnNext(spaceEvent);
// ...

The problem is that when you call subject.OnNext, it runs thru the "pipeline" * immediately*. Therefore, the next line's SingleOrDefault actually locks the text, because no value ever "arrives" to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's the secondary issue. The IDisposable problem is the first one since SpaceEventChannels wasn't receiving anything. In general, we set up subscriptions first and then push values through second (for hot observables such as this one). –  yamen May 9 '12 at 7:42
    
Yes! That's it. I was homing in on those lines of code, but hadn't worked out that particular combination! –  Benjol May 9 '12 at 7:48
1  
@yamen The IDisposable problem you are discussing is non-existent. The Dispose method does not get called automatically (unless it's in a using block). –  Dave May 9 '12 at 8:57

The primary issue you have is simple. This line:

listener.Data.Subscribe(SwitchEvent);

Returns an IDisposable. Which immediately goes out of scope and is disposed. So SwitchEvent never fires. You just need to hold that IDisposable in an instance variable in the EventDispatcher class.

private IDisposable _subscription;

public EventDispatcher(IChannelListener listener)
{
    TimeEventChannel = _TimeSubject;
    SpaceEventChannel = _SpaceSubject;
    _subscription = listener.Data.Subscribe(SwitchEvent);
}

I would also seriously consider changing EventDispatcher to accept an IObservable<AbstractEvent> rather than IChannelListener if that's all it really needs. You can imagine how much easier this would be to test too!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I'll try that right away. Concerning your last remark, this is a side effect of thinking in 'classes first'. I've noticed that with Rx, most of the things that I thought would need a lot of code actually do end up just being a function. Have you got any advice/comments about my transformation of udp into IObservable? (pinched from here) –  Benjol May 9 '12 at 7:26
    
Looks great to me! I tend to think functionally however and hence shy away from the added class plus property. You can have a class to wrap the UDP stuff, but you don't need to pass that whole class to EventDispatcher - only the IObservable interface. Basically, passing the lowest functionality interface needed. –  yamen May 9 '12 at 7:28
    
Note this could be as simple as changing this: new EventDispatcher(channel); to this: new EventDispatcher(channel.Data); in real code, and not using mocks in the test. –  yamen May 9 '12 at 7:30
    
Gave Dave the tick, as that was the last link in the chain. Hope you don't mind... –  Benjol May 9 '12 at 7:49
1  
yamen, I don't think that this is correct. The IDisposables returned by Rx don't override Finalize, so Dipose won't be called by the GC. –  Matthew Finlay May 9 '12 at 8:50

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