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I'm studying SQL for a database exam and the way I've seen SQL is they way it looks on this page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_schema IE join written the way Join <table name> On <table attribute> and then the join condition for the selection. My course book and my exercises given to me from the academic institution however, use only natural join in their examples. So when is it right to use natural join? Should natural join be used if the query can also be written using JOIN .. ON ?

Thanks for any answer or comment

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a very good visually Representative article on SQL joins might help you codinghorror.com/blog/2007/10/… –  Sanath May 9 '12 at 6:47
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A natural join is a type of equi-join, meaning conditions use only equality (=) comparisons. If you had something like ... JOIN tblA a ON a.amount > b.amount, that could not be expressed as a natural join. –  Wiseguy May 9 '12 at 6:52
    
Furthermore, a natural join will join on all columns it can. If you don't want to do that and you need to specify the column(s) you do want to join on, don't use a natural join. –  Wiseguy May 9 '12 at 7:02
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A natural join will find columns with the same name in both tables and add one column in the result for each pair found. The inner join lets you specify the comparison you want to make using any column.

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This is the best answer since it is objective, theoretical and not just SQL. –  909 Niklas May 16 '12 at 4:37
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IMO, the JOIN ON syntax is much more readable and maintainable than the natural join syntax. Natural joins is a leftover of some old standards, and I try to avoid it like the plague.

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I learned something today :) –  ᴋᴇʏsᴇʀ May 9 '12 at 8:39
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natural joins have a lot of problems besides readability. E.g. if you change one of the tables you may break the query. –  svallory May 9 '12 at 16:37
    
I agree. Thanks for answering. –  909 Niklas May 16 '12 at 4:37
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A natural join will find columns with the same name in both tables and add one column in the result for each pair found. The inner join lets you specify the comparison you want to make using any column.

The JOIN keyword is used in an SQL statement to query data from two or more tables, based on a relationship between certain columns in these tables.

Different Joins

*  JOIN: Return rows when there is at least one match in both tables
* LEFT JOIN: Return all rows from the left table, even if there are no matches in the right table
* RIGHT JOIN: Return all rows from the right table, even if there are no matches in the left table
* FULL JOIN: Return rows when there is a match in one of the tables

INNER JOIN http://www.w3schools.com/sql/sql_join_inner.asp

FULL JOIN http://www.w3schools.com/sql/sql_join_full.asp

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Thank you for the answer. +1 –  909 Niklas May 16 '12 at 4:37
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This answer does not address the question asked at all. –  Brad Dec 25 '12 at 1:18
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