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I have the following code and i would like it to be a stored procedure.

How do you create and call a stored procedure so that the following code is just like a method call.

Where are stored procedure stored are they created in Visual studio or in MS SQL Server?

using (var conn = new SqlConnection(dbConnectionString))
using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
{
        conn.Open();
        cmd.CommandText =
        @"use [Email Database]
INSERT INTO Emails_Log
(Email_ID, e_To, e_From, e_Subject, e_Date) 
VALUES
(@id, @to, @from, @subject, @date)";
        // Writes to database (local) instance
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@id", emailID);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@to", emailTo);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@from", emailFrom);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@subject", emailSubject);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@date", emailSentDate);
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
}

NEW QUESTION!

I have managed to Create a Stored Procedure thanks guys, I'm just left with one more Problem.

cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure; 

There is a red line under the second CommandType and the error reads

The name 'CommandType' does not exist in the current context

Please help.

share|improve this question
    
What's the reason you want a stored procedure rather than a parameterised query? –  Jamie Dixon May 9 '12 at 7:31
    
That's the way the boss wants it :\ –  Pomster May 9 '12 at 7:33
    
Your example doesn't have much to do with the question in the title, but you can access your database and its components in the Visual Studio in the Server Explorer window. Is that what you're asking? And you call an SP with the EXEC SQL command, but I'm sure you know that. –  Mr Lister May 9 '12 at 7:35
    
The only link to my DB is my connection String –  Pomster May 9 '12 at 7:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

On your server Create a procedure using the code below:

CREATE PROCEDURE InsertProc
(
@id <put here the datatype>, 
@to <put here the datatype>, 
@from <put here the datatype>, 
@subject <put here the datatype>, 
@date <put here the datatype>
)
AS
INSERT INTO Emails_Log (Email_ID, e_To, e_From, e_Subject, e_Date) 
        VALUES (@id, @to, @from, @subject, @date)

after you have created the procedure, in your code try this:

// other codes
cmd.CommandText = "InsertProc";
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@id", emailID);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@to", emailTo);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@from", emailFrom);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@subject", emailSubject);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@date", emailSentDate);
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
share|improve this answer
    
ok cool this all looks like the code for stored Proc thanks, i can use this :) but i did not mind doing this part my self, but how do i create one? and where? –  Pomster May 9 '12 at 7:38
    
Like in Visual Studio File new stored proc for eg –  Pomster May 9 '12 at 7:39
    
you should open the Management studio for the SQL Server. after you have connected to the server, follow this: dl.dropbox.com/u/77892454/create%20proc.JPG. –  John Woo May 9 '12 at 7:42
    
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure; there is an error under the second CommandType? –  Pomster May 9 '12 at 7:51
1  
@Pomster you need using System.Data; at the top of your file, then. –  Marc Gravell May 9 '12 at 8:13

Most commonly, you would have a sql script (or a series of incremental scripts) that you can apply to your server, creating the objects including things like sprocs; then, just (perhaps in SSMS):

use [Email Database]
create proc SomeNameHere
      -- note these lengths are made up
      @id int, @to nvarchar(400), @from nvarchar(400),
      @subject nvarchar(2000), @date datetime
as
    INSERT INTO Emails_Log
    (Email_ID, e_To, e_From, e_Subject, e_Date) 
    VALUES
    (@id, @to, @from, @subject, @date)
go

however! I would also say "why make that a sproc?" - unless you have a good reason, I genuinely challenge the thought that everything must be a sproc. In particular, it makes maintenance (especially in a deployment scenario where different servers may be at different stages) harder. Sprocs are good when you want to do non-trivial processing, don't want to transport lots of data over the wire, and it has non-trivial length - but I personally wouldn't use one just for this insert, unless it was strict local policy.

Then, in your command, set the CommandType to be stored procedure, and set "SomeNameHere" as the CommandText.

share|improve this answer
1  
You may want to add that Sprocs used to help to abstract away changes in the database design but that this point is becoming less important with ORM frameworks. –  Filburt May 9 '12 at 7:37
1  
Hey Marc Gravell that last line with command type, could you write it out on how it would look? this is what i got: cmd.CommandText = "InsertProc"; cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure; and it gives and error –  Pomster May 9 '12 at 7:57
    
@Pomster what exactly does that error say? –  Marc Gravell May 9 '12 at 8:11
    
The name 'CommandType' does not exist in the current context is the Error –  Pomster May 9 '12 at 8:12
1  
@Pomster add using System.Data; at the top of the code file –  Marc Gravell May 9 '12 at 8:14

Stored procedures are stored in sql server. First you have to create the stored procedure in sql server. here you can see how to create a stored procedure. Then you need to call the stored procedure in c# here you can see how you can call stored procedures that are saved in ms sql server. hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks will check it out –  Pomster May 9 '12 at 7:41

The error "The name 'CommandType' does not exist in the current context" is caused by a missing namespace. Just add "using System.Data;" on top and it will work.

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