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I don't want the user to go back to secured pages by clicking back button after logging out. In my logout code, I am unsetting the sessions and redirecting to login page.But, I think the browser is caching the page so it becomes visible despite the session being destroyed from logout.

I am able to avoid this by not allowing the browser to cache

header("Cache-Control", "no-cache, no-store, must-revalidate")

But this way I am loosing the advantage of Browser Caching.

Please suggest a better way of achieving this. I feel, there must be a way of handling this by javascript client side

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5  
You don't have to disable anything. If they go back, they're served the cached version of the restricted page. If they try to click around it, nothing will work because the appropriate session won't be set. –  N.B. May 9 '12 at 7:50
    
@N.B. A possible solution which might not necessarily be always usable as the user might have sensitive data on his display and then logs out. Another comes by (although the workstation should be locked ;) ) and presses back and sees (although cached) the data of the previous user. We usually add an info message alerting the user to close the browser (just to be sure all sessions have been cleared). It's not necessarily the best way, but at least you gave the user the info about the potential problem. –  Juri May 9 '12 at 8:11
    
A cheap fix if all else fails would be a "Please close this window for security reasons" message on the logged out page. –  izb May 9 '12 at 8:36
2  
I'm facing the same issue. Is there a was to display different content if the user does hit the back button and is no longer logged in? I would like to keep from using anything client side. Facebook does this, if you have noticed after logging out and if you try going back it will display a different page, regardless if anything client side is enabled or disabled. How Is this done? I'm assuming there is probably more to it then just cache control? Hopefully someone has some good insight to this. –  user96534678 Jan 12 '13 at 21:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Implement this in PHP and not javascript.

At the top of each page, check to see if the user is logged in. If not, they should be redirected to a login page:

<?php 
      if(!isset($_SESSION['logged_in'])) : 
      header("Location: login.php");  
?>

As you mentioned, on logout, simply unset the logged_in session variable, and destroy the session:

<?php
      unset($_SESSION['logged_in']);  
      session_destroy();  
?>

If the user clicks back now, no logged_in session variable will be available, and the page will not load.

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11  
I have already implemented this technique. But hitting back button don't actually requests to server. Instead the back page is rendered from browser cache. Hence it is not redirecting to login page. –  piyush May 9 '12 at 12:12
    
So what is the problem? The user can't interact with server after logout and with back button he only retrieve data which he has already seen. If those data can be misused by someone else, just notice the user to close the window or use annonymous tab, if he doesn't, it's his fault. –  david Jul 3 '13 at 16:07

I think your only server side option is to disallow caching. This is actually not that bad if you are using a Javascript heavy application as your main HTML might only be a series of JS calls and the Views are then generated on the fly. That way the bulk of the data (JS MVC and core code) is cached but the actual page request isn't.

To add to the comments pasted below I would suggest adding a small AJAX call during load time that fires even for cached pages that goes to your backend and checks the session. If not session is not found it would redirect the user away. This is clientside code and not a secure fix, sure, but looks nicer.

You could get this off your conscience with

A cheap fix if all else fails would be a "Please close this window for security reasons" message on the logged out page. – izb May 9 '12 at 8:36

But like N.B. said

You don't have to disable anything. If they go back, they're served the cached version of the restricted page. If they try to click around it, nothing will work because the appropriate session won't be set. – N.B. May 9 '12 at 7:50

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You could insert a condition/function on each restricted page, checking if the appropriate session variable is set or not. This way, you can print 2 versions of the page (one for the valid users, and one redirecting to the login page)

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1  
I have already implemented this. But it won't stop the user to render the page when clicked on Back button since it is rendered from browser's cache. Although, if user refreshes the page or does any action on the page he will be redirected back to login page. Since there may be few personal information in the inner pages I want to restrict user to be able to view the previous pages by hitting back button after logout. –  piyush May 9 '12 at 12:17

Avoiding the user to go back is not a good reason and most of all not secure at all.

If you test the user's session before every "admin" action made on the website, you should be fine, even if the user hit the back button, sees the cached page and tries something.

The "ties something" will return an error since the session is no longer valid.

Instead, you should focus on having a really secured back office.

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Here's an easy and quick solution.

To the login form tag add target="_blank" which displays content in a different window. Then after logout simply close that window and the back button problem (Safari browser) is solved.

Even trying to use the history will not display the page and instead redirect to login page. This is fine for Safari browsers but for others such as Firefox the session_destroy(); takes care of it.

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the pages on which you required loged in, use setInterval for every 1000 ms and check wheather user is logged in or not using ajax. if user session is invalid, redirect him to log in page.

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A possible hack could be adding below simple script in the beginning of the logout redirected page if don't want the user to goback to.

<script language="javascript" >
history.go(1); /* Tested for IE Back Button) */
</script>
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4  
It's not a security fix if it's defeated by disabling javascript –  Gareth May 9 '12 at 8:39
    
It is not working for me on. –  piyush May 9 '12 at 12:13

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