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I have a question (obviously). I thought I had a reasonable understanding of the this object in JavaScript. When dealing with objects, callbacks, and both events and handlers, I haven't had a problem with it since time and memorial. Now, however, all has changed.

I've fallen head over heels in love with JavaScript. Pure JS, that is, not jQuery, prototype.js,dojo... So naturally, I've taken to using closures. In some cases, though, this is catching me off guard here. Take this snippet for one:

function anyFunc(par)
{
    //console.log(par);
    console.log(this);
}

function makeClosure(func)
{
    return function(par)
    {
        return func(par);
    }
}
var close = makeClosure(anyFunc);
close('Foo');

var objWithClosure = {cls:makeClosure(anyFunc),prop:'foobar'};
objWithClosure.cls(objWithClosure.prop);

var scndObj = {prop:'Foobar2'};
scndObj.cls = makeClosure;
scndObj.cls = scndObj.cls(anyFunc);
scndObj.cls(scndObj.prop);

In all three cases, this logs as the window object. It's an easy fix, of course:

function makeClosure(func)
{
    return function(par)
    {
        return func.call(this,par);
    }
}

This fix works, I put it here to avoid people answering this, without explaining what I need to know: why is this behaving the way it does here?

ensures the caller is effectively the object that the closure belongs to. What I fail to understand is this: Sure enough, this points to the window object in the first case, but in other cases, it shouldn't. I tried logging this in the makeClosure function just before returning, and it did log the object itself, not the window object. But when the actual closure is used, this is back to pointing to the window object. Why?

The only thing I can think of is that, by passing the anyFunc function as an argument, I'm actually passing window.anyFunc. So I tried this quick fix:

function makeClosure(func)
{
    var theFunc = func;
    return function(par)
    {
        theFunc(par);
    }
}

With the expected results, this now points to the objects, but again: Why? I have a few idea's (theFunc is a reference to the function in the local scope [this > private: theFunc]?), but I'm sure there are people here with a lot more know-how when it comes to JS, so I was hoping to get some more explanation or links to articles worth reading from them...

Thanks

Update

Here's a fiddle, may be I left something out, but here this logs all sorts of things ;)

Edit/Update 2

The case that confuses me is here.

Final Edit

Ok, This is getting a rather messy post. So to clarify: What I was expecting was a behaviour similar to this:

function makeClosure()
{
    function fromThisFunc()
    {
        console.log(this);
    }
    return fromThisFunc;
}

var windowContext = makeClosure();
windowContext();
var objectContext = {cls:makeClosure()};
objectContext.cls();

What caught me, was that the function anyFunc wasn't declared within the correct scope, and therefore, this pointed to the window object. I found this out by reading an ancient scroll I found somewhere on the web.

But something a little more complicated has happened because the function object now referred to by globalVar was created with a [[scope]] property referring to a scope chain containing the Activation/Variable object belonging to the execution context in which it was created (and the global object). Now the Activation/Variable object cannot be garbage collected either as the execution of the function object referred to by globalVar will need to add the whole scope chain from its [[scope]] property to the scope of the execution context created for each call to it.

So what I needed to do, was simplify rather then complicate things:

function fromThisFunc()
{
    console.log(this);
}

function makeClosure(funcRef)
{
    //some code here
    return funcRef;
}

That should work, right?

PS: I'll except Alnitak's answer, but special thanks goes to Felix Kling for all the patience and info.

share|improve this question
    
I don't really get what other answer than a link to a global explanation of closures could be made. This course is an excellent reading and should remove all uncertainties : ejohn.org/apps/learn –  dystroy May 9 '12 at 8:04
    
The problem isn't that I don't get closures. What is causing the headaches is that I'm not entirely sure what happens to the this object when making closures the way I do here –  Elias Van Ootegem May 9 '12 at 8:07
2  
I cannot reproduce the behviour you describe. I get DOMWindow, Object, Object: jsfiddle.net/GErkX, whereas your second "fix" gives me 3 x DOMWindow: jsfiddle.net/tZXQF –  Felix Kling May 9 '12 at 8:12
    
Which is the correct behaviout btw, so I would be really surprised if it would work like you described. –  Felix Kling May 9 '12 at 8:19
    
Re your second edit: What is confusing here? You are calling func like a normal function (func(par)) hence inside the function this refers to window. This is your first case which seems to be what you expected. –  Felix Kling May 9 '12 at 9:01
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As soon as you call:

return func(par);

You're creating a new scope (with its own this) and in this case because you haven't specified an object, this === window. The called function does not inherit whatever this was in the calling scope.

The only ways to set a context are to use:

myobj.func(par);  // this === myobj

or

func.call(myobj, ...)  // or .apply
share|improve this answer
1  
or -apparently- create a local var in the makeClosure function, and assign the func parameter to that variable... also, return func(par) is the function body, of a function that is returned to an object, so I assumed the call to func(par) would be made in the object's context. Why isn't it? –  Elias Van Ootegem May 9 '12 at 8:10
    
@EliasVanOotegem I'm still trying to get my head around that former case... I can't replicate it locally. –  Alnitak May 9 '12 at 8:12
2  
@EliasVanOotegem: I think your tests are flawed somehow, especially the last one. Whenever you make a simply function call foo(), this will refer to the global object, no matter where the function was defined. In which environment are you testing the code? Creating a local variable does not make a difference in this case. The parameter is local as well. Your first fix works fine here: jsfiddle.net/GErkX –  Felix Kling May 9 '12 at 8:13
    
@FelixKling I can't replicate that case either (under Chrome 18) –  Alnitak May 9 '12 at 8:14
    
@FelixKling: I am testing in Chrome, and I have provided a fiddle with the exact (messy) code. The first fix does work, but I want to know why this is what I need it to be at one time, and the window object the other –  Elias Van Ootegem May 9 '12 at 8:31
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The value of this depends only on whether you call the function as a method or as a function.

If you call it as a method, this will be the object that the method belongs to:

obj.myFunction();

If you call it as a function, this will be the window object:

myFunction();

Note that even if you are in a method that belongs to an object, you still have to call other methods in the object using the method syntax, otherwise they will be called as functions:

this.myOtherFunction();

If you put a method reference in a variable, you will detach it from the object, and it will be called as a function:

var f = obj.myFunction;
f();

The call and apply methods are used to call a function as a method even if it's not a method in the object (or if it's a method in a different object):

myFunction.call(obj);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but not really an answer to this question... I currently use call, but I want to know why JS behaves the way it does. on the method reference bit: it is well odd that, when I create a function reference (not method, a function) in a function that is attached to an object, that very function ref will be called as a method –  Elias Van Ootegem May 9 '12 at 8:28
    
+1 for the detach method tip, btw –  Elias Van Ootegem May 9 '12 at 8:31
    
@EliasVanOotegem it's because as soon as you attach that function reference to an object, it becomes a method of that object. It's the opposite to what happens when you detach a method. –  Alnitak May 9 '12 at 8:38
    
but I'm not attaching that function directly, I'm attaching makeClosure, and passing a function reference to it. Within makeClosure, that passed reference is assigned to a variable. When I use that variable, the function (passed as argument) is called as a method, but when I use the argument directly, it's called as a function... that is the confusing part –  Elias Van Ootegem May 9 '12 at 8:50
1  
@EliasVanOotegem: No it does not: jsfiddle.net/tZXQF If you are referring to jsfiddle.net/3chdp, then note that you are still using .call(). It has nothing to do with the local variable, if you remove it you get the same result. –  Felix Kling May 9 '12 at 9:00
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