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Javascript has built-in function for time where

    var date = new Date();
    d.getHours() //gets the hour in integer 0-23
    d.getMinutes() //gets the minute in integer 0-59

I would like function (e.g. A()) to run between 0:35 and 4:35

Is this possible to do using just simple logic operation (&&, ||)? I don't think it is possible, but I wanted to know the elegant way to implement it.

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1  
You want to iterate on time values? Or you want your function to run between those two times of the day continuously? Please clarify. –  kapa May 9 '12 at 8:48
1  
It won't run on its own, you could make a function A() run if the time was between x and y. –  gideon May 9 '12 at 8:48
    
@bažmegakapa: the latter is what I am looking for. () will handle polling so there is no need worry. –  Forethinker May 9 '12 at 17:46
    
@gideon: yes that is what I was looking for. A() will handle polling so there is no need worry. –  Forethinker May 9 '12 at 17:46
    
The answers below are all good. I am surprised to see some of the implementations that I would never have thought of. –  Forethinker May 9 '12 at 18:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Technically it's possible, but you are absolutely right in that this is not an elegant solution:

var h = d.getHours();
var m = d.getMinutes();
if ((h == 0 && m >= 35) || (h > 0 && h < 4) || (h == 4 && m <=35)) {
    A();
}
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There is an easier way to do this. Too many || conditions. –  aaronfrost May 9 '12 at 14:52
    
@aaronfrost I don't think so. –  Pumbaa80 May 9 '12 at 22:00

You could use the timestamp to compare.

var date = new Date();
var year = date.getFullYear();
var month = date.getMonth();
var day = date.getDate();
var start = new Date(year, month, day, 0, 35);
var end = new Date(year, month, day, 4, 35);

if (date.getTime() >= start.getTime() && date.getTime() <= end.getTime()) {
  //...
}
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var date = Date.now();     // ES5 - or new Date().getTime()
var sec = (date / 1000);   // seconds since epoch
sec = sec % 86400;         // seconds since midnight
var mins = sec / 60;       // minutes since midnight

if (mins >= 35 && mins < 4*60+35) {
    A();
}
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does not work. Other then secs->sec error, also dividing by 60 does not give the minutes. Maybe I am wrong, but I did play around with it for 10 minutes... –  Forethinker May 16 '12 at 1:24
    
@Prometheus sorry - there were two sec vs secs typos... The code above is now correct. –  Alnitak May 16 '12 at 8:02

This should work:

function foo(){
    var now = new Date();
    if( (now.getHours() < 1 && now.getMinutes() < 35) 
       || (now.getHours() > 3 && now.getMinutes() > 35) ){
         return false; //if it isn't in your time, return false
    }

    //put your code here. this will run between the hours of 12:35AM and 4:35AM local time

}

I hope this is what you are looking for. If not, let me know.

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how about 4:15? –  Pumbaa80 May 9 '12 at 9:10
    
At 4:15AM, it would run your code. At 4:15PM, it would return false. –  aaronfrost May 9 '12 at 9:12
    
It doesn't return false at 4:15pm. Basically it runs at x:15 whenever x>=1. –  Pumbaa80 May 9 '12 at 11:30
    
You are wrong. It only runs between the hours of 0:35 and 4:35. Other than that it returns false. Write a unit test or something. Anything beyond 4:35AM returns false var a = new Date().setHours(4,35,0,0); var b = new Date().setHours(4,36,0,0); foo(a);foo(b); –  aaronfrost May 9 '12 at 14:50
    
Did you even read my second comment? jsfiddle.net/jrUQq –  Pumbaa80 May 9 '12 at 21:57

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