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I wanted to use Lua Lanes to do a multithreading and record the time taken. Here is the code:

require "lanes"

function performTest ()
    os.execute("testJson-mt.lua")
end

for i=1,10,1 do
    f= lanes.gen(performTest)
    a=f()
    startTime = os.time()
    print("ID "..a[1].." completed.")
    endTime = os.time()
    diff = os.difftime (endTime, startTime)
    print(i..","..os.date("%x %X",startTime)..","..os.date("%x %X",endTime)..","..startTime..","..endTime..","..diff)
end

However, when I run the code, the console returns an error: lua: testLanes.lua:4: attempt to index global 'os' (a nil value).

This error code point to this line where os.execute("testJson-mt.lua"). I don't quite understand this error. Please advise.

Note: I am using Lua for Windows as the IDE.

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

By default, lanes.gen loads no libraries, not even base libraries. Therefore pass '*' as the first parameter to lanes.gen to get the os and other modules in the lane.

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I have tried it. It works. Thanks! – ktlim May 9 '12 at 12:24
2  
Marking an answer which helped you as solved would be great ;) – Michal Kottman May 9 '12 at 14:04
    
"*" loads all libraries which is overkill, you could just use "os" as the first parameter to lanes.gen – Stomp Sep 21 '12 at 17:03
1  
Technically you are correct, but in practice you'll soon need print (in the base library), some string processing, etc., so I usually use '*' at start and later tune the libraries when necessary. – Michal Kottman Sep 22 '12 at 9:55
    
good point! practice > theory :) – Stomp Sep 24 '12 at 20:09

You could also just do require "os".

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1  
Note that this call to require would have to be inside the function performTest() so that it is executed in each lane rather than in the base state. – RBerteig May 9 '12 at 18:39

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