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First of all, I know the standard answer will be that exceptions are never to be used for flow control. While I perfectly agree with this, I've been thinking a long time about something I sometimes did, which I'll describe with the following pseudo-code:

try
    string keyboardInput = read()
    int number = int.parse(keyboardInput)
    //the conversion succeeds
    if(number >= 1000) 
        //That's not what I asked for. The message to display to the user
        //is already in the catch-block below.
        throw new NumberFormatException() //well, there IS something wrong with the number...
 catch(NumberFormatException ex)  //the user entered text
    print("Please enter a valid number below 1000.")

First of all, take this example in a very abstract way. This does not necessarily have to happen. The situation simply is:

A user input needs to be constrained and can go wrong in 2 ways, either by a thrown exception the language defines, or by a check. Both errors are reported by the user in the same way, because they do not need to know the technical difference of what caused it.

I have thought of several ways to solve it. To begin with, it would be better to throw a custom made exception. The problem I then face is, if I catch it locally, what to do with the other exception? In se, the custom exception would be cause for a second catch-block, in which the message would be copied into just as well. My solution:

//number is wrong
throw new MyException()
catch(NumberFormatException ex) 
    throw new MyException()
catch(MyException ex) {
    print("Please enter...")

The meaning of the exceptions' names is everything here. This application of custom-made exceptions is widely accepted, but essentially I didn't do anything different from the first way: I forced to go into a catch-block, albeit by throwing a custom exception rather than a standard-library one.

The same way applied to throwing the exception on to the calling method (thus not having a catch block for the custom exception) seems to make more sense. My method can go wrong in what is technically two ways, but essentially one way: wrong user input. Therefore, one would write a UserInputException and make the method throw this. New problem: what if this is the main method of an application?

I'm not currently struggling with a specific application to implement this kind of behaviour, my question is purely theoretical and non-language specific.

What is the best way to approach this?

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I believe that several languages use exceptions as the core of many of their flow control structures - I think python still uses it for its iterator foreach loops. So "exceptions are never to be used for flow control." seems a little strong to me... –  Michael Anderson May 15 '12 at 2:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+150

I think you have essentially a few ways to go about it with minimal code duplication in mind:

  1. Use a boolean variable/store the exception: If there was an error anywhere in the the general logic of the specific task you are performing, you exit on the first sign of error and handle that in a separate error handling branch.

    Advantages: only one place to handle the error; you can use any custom exception/error condition you like.

    Disadvantages: the logic of what you are trying to achieve might be hard to discover.

  2. Create a general function that you can use to inform the user about the error (pre-calculating/storing all information that describes the general error, e.g. the message to display the user), so you can just make one function call when an error condition happens.

    Advantages: the logic of your intent might be clearer for readers of the code; you can use anu custom exception/error conditon you like.

    Disadvantages: the error will have to be handled in separate places (although with the pre-computed/stored values, there is not much copy-paste, however complex the informing the user part).

  3. If the intent is clear, I don't think throwing exceptions from within your try block explicitly is a bad idea. If you do not want to throw one of the system provided exceptions, you can always create your own that derives from one of them, so you only need a minimal number (preferably one) of catch blocks.

    Advantages: only one place to handle error condition -- if there is essentially only one type of exception thrown in try-block.

    Disadvantages: if more than one type of exception is thrown, you need nested try-catch blocks (to propagate the exceptions to the most outward one) or a very general (e.g. Exception) catch block to avoid having to duplicate error reporting.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nicely structured and clear answer, I really appreciate that you enumerated some possibilities. –  MDeSchaepmeester May 15 '12 at 10:02
    
You get the bounty because everyone else coded either one of the 3 things you said or the answer didn't really suit my needs. I guess it is something situation-dependant. Thanks. –  MDeSchaepmeester May 22 '12 at 11:00

You do not need any exceptions in this particular example.

int number;
if (int.TryParse(keyboardInput, out number) && number < 1000) // success
else // error

However, the situation you describe is common in business software, and throwing an exception to reach a uniform handler is quite common.

One such pattern is XML validation followed by XSLT. In some systems, invalid XML is handled through catching validation exceptions. In these systems, it is pretty natural to reuse the existing exception handling in XSLT (which can naturally detect some classes of data errors that a particular validation language cannot):

<xsl:if test="@required = 'yes' and @prohibited = 'yes'>
    <xsl:message terminate='yes'>Error message</xsl:message>
</xsl:if>

It is important to see that if such conditions are extremely rare (expected to occur only during early integration testing, and disappear as defects in other modules get fixed), most of the typical concerns around not using exceptions for flow control do not really apply.

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1  
I believe the question was more general than this, it's not about converting a string to an int, but in general whenever some tests throw an exception while others do not. Note that the code is pseudocode, not some particular language (although it looks a lot like java). –  alexg May 9 '12 at 10:01
    
@alexg I'll admit that, but that's because my main languages are Java and C#. –  MDeSchaepmeester May 9 '12 at 10:17
    
I also thought it was a java question at first. But then I noticed the tags: design, code-duplication, flow-control. –  alexg May 9 '12 at 10:18
    
@alexg i explicitly specified as well that the intention of the question is theoretical. Nevertheless, Jirka specifies an answer that is very case-specific. –  MDeSchaepmeester May 9 '12 at 10:22
    
@MarioDeSchaepmeester - I would say that the smaller and simpler the example, the more you should try to rewrite to not using exceptions. If it is a complex pre-existing plug-in infrastructure with its own considerable overhead, such a project would be far from adequate. I tried to add an example of the latter I often meet into the answer. –  Jirka Hanika May 9 '12 at 10:36

The way I see it is this:

Assuming there's no other way to parse your int that doesn't throw an exception, your code as it is now, is correct and elegant.

The only issue would be if your code was in some kind of loop, in which case you might worry about the overhead of throwing and catching unnecessary exceptions. In that case, you will have to compromise some of your code's beauty in favor of only handling exceptions whenever necessary.

error=false;

try {
    string keyboardInput = read();
    int number = int.parse(keyboardInput);
    //the conversion succeeds
    if(number >= 1000) {
        //That's not what I asked for. The message to display to the user
        //is already in the catch-block below.
        error=true;
} catch(NumberFormatException ex) { //the user entered text
    error=true;
}

if (error)
    print("Please enter a valid number below 1000.");

Also you can think about why you're trying to aggregate two errors into one. Instead you could inform the user as to what error they did, which might be more helpful in some cases:

try {
    string keyboardInput = read();
    int number = int.parse(keyboardInput);
    //the conversion succeeds
    if(number >= 1000) {
        //That's not what I asked for. The message to display to the user
        //is already in the catch-block below.
        print("Please enter a number below 1000.");

} catch(NumberFormatException ex) { //the user entered text
    print("Please enter a valid number.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I had already thought of using a boolean variable and using a finally block, it does indeed seem a good idea. The second piece of code is exactly what I'm trying to avoid. The user understands with "valid number below 1000" that he should not enter text, nor a number greater than 1000. The whole reason is that in order to get decently-formatted MessageBoxes in a lot of languages is a pretty large chunk of code. –  MDeSchaepmeester May 9 '12 at 10:19
    
I understand, I've faced the same dillema before. Using a finally block is a good idea. Basically you're going to have to trade one advantage for another. Is your main worry performance or code niceness/shortness? Using a boolean does achieve the goal of not duplicating the Message Box code. –  alexg May 9 '12 at 10:28

What about approaching this validation problem by writing several validator classes that take in an input and return errors, or no errors. As far as your struggle with exceptions: put that logic into each validator and deal with it there on a case by case basis.

after that you figure out the correct validators to use for your input, collect their errors and handle them.

the benefits of this are:

  1. Validators do one thing, validate a single case
  2. Its up to the validation function to decide how to handle the errors. Do you break on first validation error or do you collect them all and then deal with them?
  3. You can write your code is such a way that the main validation function can validate different types of input using the same code, just picking the correct validators using your favorite technique.

and disadvantages:

  1. You will end up writing more code (but if you are using java, this should be put into the 'benefits' bucket)

here is some example pseudo-code:

validate(input):
   validators = Validator.for(input.type)
   errors = []
   for validator in validators:
       errors.push(validator.validate(input))

   if errors:
       throw PoopException          

and some validators:

MaxValidator extends IntValidator: 
    validate(input):
        errors = []
        errors.push(super.validate(input))
        if input > 1000:
            errors.push("bleee!!!! to big!")
        return errors

IntValidator:
     validate(input):
        try:
           int.parse(input)
        catch NumberFormatException:
           return ['not an int']
        return []

of course you would need to do some trickery to make the parent validator possibly return you a valid version of the input, in this case string "123" converted to an int so the max validator can handle it, but this can be easily accomplished by making the validators statefull or some other magic.

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I like your approach especially because it is more OOP. Seems like you'll end up with a more structured program. However, my question does not always concern input validation (I know it isn't clear but I had to use some example). I don't understand though what you mean by writing more code in java is an advantage? –  MDeSchaepmeester May 15 '12 at 10:08
    
writing more code in java is a good thing was a joke. Java is perceived as a very verbose language, and i was alluding to that ;) - but yes this is the OOP approach that will be much easier to refactor in the future, and i find that thinking about problems in small chunks is also helpful in many ways –  mkoryak May 15 '12 at 11:07

I would consider the first exception to be low-level, and I would handle it (by translation in this case) at the point of call. I find that this leads to code that is easier to maintain and refactor later, as you have less types of exceptions to handle.

try
  string keyboardInput = read()
  try
    int number = int.parse(keyboardInput)
  catch(NumberFormatException ex)
    throw MyException("Input value was not a number")

  //the conversion succeeds
  if(number >= 1000) 
    throw MyException("Input value was out of range")

catch(MyException ex)  //the user entered text
  print( ex.ToString() )
  print("Please enter a valid number below 1000.")
share|improve this answer

I can't see this answer anywhere in here, so I'll just post it as another point of view.

As we all know, you can actually break the rules if you know them well enough, so you can use throwing an Exception for flow control if you know it's the best solution for your situation. From what I've seen, it happens usually with some dumb frameworks...

That said, before Java 7 (which brought us the mighty multicatch construct), this was my approach to avoid code repetition:

try {
    someOffendingMethod();
} catch (Exception e) {
    if (e instanceof NumberFormatException || e instanceof MyException) {
        System.out.println("Please enter a valid number.");
    }
}

It's a valid technique in C#, too.

share|improve this answer
    
Pretty clever hack before multicatch but isn't instanceofa rather demanding operation? Besides, this code sample is not really the same as what I'm doing. I'm deliberately "steering" the program to a catch branch because it just happens to contain a messagebox code that's appropriate for the situation. –  MDeSchaepmeester May 22 '12 at 10:15
    
When you're using Exceptions to control your program flow, you absolutely shouldn't be worried about instanceof being slow :). But yeah, the approach I posted is just a rather nice way to practically write your construct, not a theoretical discussion about it. I simply accepted that sometimes it's necessary to do it, so why not to do it in the best possible way? –  Slanec May 22 '12 at 12:06

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