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I have a java aplet that is sending a JSON encoded object to a Zend Framework JSON Server.

the problem that I have is the code is setup like this:

ServerController:

public function jsonAction()
{

$server = new Zend_Json_Server();
$Server->setClass('Application_Model_ClassObject', 'co');

if('GET' == $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'])
{
    $server->setTarget('...')
           ->setEnvelope(Zend_Json_Server_Smd::ENV_JSONRPC_2);
    $smd = $server->getServiceMap();

    header('Content-Type: application/json');

    echo $smd;
    return
}

echo $server->handle();
}

ClassObject function:

/**
* DoSomethign description
* @param ClassObject
*/
public function doSomething(Application_Model_ClassObject $obj)
{

    $someVariable = $obj->getSomeValue();
    ...
}

I get an error response from the server saying that obj needs to be an instance of ClassObject

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1  
How do you work with the json reponse? I mean could you show how you put the stuff from $_GET['something'] to your function doSomething(...) –  rekire May 9 '12 at 9:59
    
Could you show us anything about that ClassObject? You need to instantiate one and populate it with data. –  kapa May 9 '12 at 10:16
    
Where is the json decoded to an object? –  vascowhite May 9 '12 at 11:30
1  
You specify the name of your class in the old style of formatting for namespacing. Therefore your type hint needs to be Application_Model_ClassObject rather than ClassObject. I am only assuming this because of line 4 of your code snippet. –  GordyD May 9 '12 at 11:52
    
Sorry i have checked the code and corrected the snippet, both of the formatting is the same. –  William May 9 '12 at 12:06
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3 Answers

Ok so this is what we ended up doing (Quick and dirty version)... Although i believe there is a better way.

  1. Removed the type-hint so that the function will be able to receive any data.
  2. Create a new function in "Application_Model_ClassObject" that will handle an array of data or an object.
  3. Added a few extra lines to "doSomething" so that the rest can go on as normal.

Here are some details:

/**
* DoSomethign description
* @param ClassObject
*/
public function doSomething($data)
{
    $obj = new Application_Model_ClassObject();
    $obj->populate($data);

    $someVariable = $obj->getSomeValue();
    ...
}

/**
*
* Application_Model_ClassObject class
*/
class Application_Model_ClassObject
{
    ...

    public function populate($row)
    {
        if (is_array($row)) {
        $row = new ArrayObject($row, ArrayObject::ARRAY_AS_PROPS);
        }

        if (isset ($row->SomeValue)) {
        $this->setSomeValue($row->SomeValue);
        }

        return $this;
    }

}
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If you remove the type hint "ClassObject", then the doSomething method will accept any data that comes in. Then it's up to the doSomething method to decode the json string, and do something useful with it.

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There might be a reason for the typehint :). Maybe a certain method the function expects. ClassObject can even be a clumsily named interface. I would not advise to change it. –  kapa May 9 '12 at 10:18
    
Type hints are usually there for a reason. Removing them because of an error is not advisable and will probably cause the class to fail in some other way. –  vascowhite May 9 '12 at 11:27
    
The doSomething method receives JSON data straight from the JSON server. Since there is no class-mapping available for the JSON server, the incoming data can only be of a standard PHP type. This way it makes sense to either remove the type hint, or change it to something more generic like "array". If you were to use a Zend_Soap_Server on the other hand, then you would have class-mapping available. And then it would make sense to have complex type hinting in your entry points for your API. –  Miljar May 10 '12 at 13:37
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public function doSomething(ClassObject obj) { ... }

Um, usually you don't write PHP functions like that, as it's not strongly typed. Normally, it looks like this instead:

public function doSomething($obj) {...}

It looks like you've tried to write a PHP function with some Java syntax mixed in.

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1  
You can do type hints in PHP functions too. –  Dan Lee May 9 '12 at 10:04
1  
It's perfectly possible to add a typehint to your method definition, like the author did. Classes are supported, as are arrays. Other basic types are not (yet) supported AFAIK. –  Miljar May 9 '12 at 10:06
    
So it becomes more a question of if you should, as it would incur extraneous effort for OP here. (Copying the data structure from a plain data object into a ClassObject manually.) –  mario May 9 '12 at 10:07
    
Ah, wonderful. I wasn't aware of that. Sorry about the confusion. –  avlund May 9 '12 at 10:11
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