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Starting from the follwing situation:

public interface ISample
{
}

public class SampleA : ISample
{
   // has some (unmanaged) resources that needs to be disposed
}

public class SampleB : ISample
{
   // has no resources that needs to be disposed
}

The class SampleA should implement the interface IDisposable for releasing resources. You could solve this in two ways:

1. Add the required interface to the class SampleA:

public class SampleA : ISample, IDisposable
{
   // has some (unmanaged) resources that needs to be disposed
}

2. Add it to the interface ISample and force derived classes to implement it:

public interface ISample : IDisposable
{
}

If you put it into the interface you force any implementation to implement IDisposable even if they have nothing to dispose. On the other hand, it is very clear to see that the concrete implementation of an interface requires a dispose/using block and you don't need to cast as IDisposable for cleaning up. There might be some more pros/cons in both ways... why would you suggest to use one way preferred to the other?

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4  
How likely is it that code written against the interface (presumably being handed an already constructed instance) is responsible for ending the (useful) lifetime of that instance? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 9 '12 at 10:11
1  
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: Ok, assuming the ISample comes from a factory method result or via Dependency Injection. –  Beachwalker May 9 '12 at 11:25
2  
That's the thing - if it is coming from a factory, then likely your code is responsible for disposal - so I'd put it on the Interface. But if it's being injected then I'd assuming the injector is responsible for the lifetime also, so it wouldn't fit on the interface - I don't think there's a one-size-fits-all answer to the question. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 9 '12 at 11:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you apply the using(){} pattern to all your interfaces it's best to have ISample derive from IDisposable because the rule of thumb when designing interfaces is to favor "ease-of-use" over "ease-of-implementation".

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how would you use a using statement in a foreach? –  M Afifi May 23 '12 at 8:56
1  
"... and you just see the interface..." That's the key. Many good, OOP solutions will only use the interface, so I think it makes sense for the interface to implement IDisposable. That way the consuming code can treat all of the subclasses the same way. –  Bob Horn Jun 18 '12 at 1:05

Personally, if all ISample's should be disposable I'd put it on the interface, if only some are I'd only put it on the classes where it should be.

Sounds like you have the latter case.

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But how to ensure the calling of Dispose() if the user of your lib does not know it and there might be an implementation with is required to dispose? –  Beachwalker May 9 '12 at 11:26
    
@Stegi - Easy. Just test is IDisposable and call Dispose if so. –  Jamiec May 9 '12 at 11:30
    
Yes I know, but this would rubbish the code... because EVERY other implementation (e.g. IList, I...) could be IDisposable. Seems to me like IDisposable should be a general object base class implementation (even if empty). –  Beachwalker May 9 '12 at 11:46
1  
@Stegi - Then you've answered your own question really. –  Jamiec May 9 '12 at 12:42
    
@Stegi assuming you're ok with the performance impact of a tryf –  M Afifi May 9 '12 at 13:32

IDispoable being a very common interface, there's no harm having your interface inheriting from it. You will so avoid type checking in your code at the only cost to have a no-op implementation in some of your ISample implementations. So your 2nd choice might be better from this point of view.

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An interface IFoo should probably implement IDisposable if it is likely that at least some some implementations will implement IDisposable, and on at least some occasions the last surviving reference to an instance will be stored in a variable or field of type IFoo. It should almost certainly implement IDisposable if any implementations might implement IDisposable and instances will be created via factory interface (as is the case with instances of IEnumerator<T>, which in many cases are created via factory interface IEnumerable<T>).

Comparing IEnumerable<T> and IEnumerator<T> is instructive. Some types which implement IEnumerable<T> also implement IDisposable, but code which creates instances of such types will know what they are, know that they need disposal, and use them as their particular types. Such instances may be passed to other routines as type IEnumerable<T>, and those other routines would have no clue that the objects are eventually going to need disposing, but those other routines would in most cases not be the last ones to hold references to the objects. By contrast, instances of IEnumerator<T> are often created, used, and ultimately abandoned, by code which knows nothing about the underlying types of those instances beyond the fact that they're returned by IEnumerable<T>. Some implementations of IEnumerable<T>.GetEnumerator() return implementations of IEnumerator<T> will leak resources if their IDisposable.Dispose method is not called before they are abandoned, and most code which accepts parameters of type IEnumerable<T> will have no way of knowing if such types may be passed to it. Although it would be possible for IEnumerable<T> to include a property EnumeratorTypeNeedsDisposal to indicate whether the returned IEnumerator<T> would have to be disposed, or simply require that routines which call GetEnumerator() check the type of the returned object to see if it implements IDisposable, it's quicker and easier to unconditionally call a Dispose method that might not do anything, than to determine whether Dispose is necessary and call it only if so.

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Following the Inteface Segregation Principle of SOLID if you add the IDisposable to the interface you are giving methods to clients that are not interested in so you should add it to A.

Apart from that, an interface is never disposable because disposability is something related with the concrete implementation of the interface, never with the interface itself.

Any interface can be potentially implemented with or without elements that need to be disposed.

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Personally I would choose 1, unless you make a concrete example for two. A good example of two is an IList.

An IList means you need to implement an indexer for your collection. However, an IList really also means you are an IEnumerable, and you should have a GetEnumerator() for your class.

In your case you are hesistant that classes that implement ISample would need to implement IDisposable, if not every class that implements your interface has to implement IDisposable then don't force them to.

Focusing on IDispoable specifically, IDispoable in particular forces programmers using your class to write some reasonably ugly code. For example,

foreach(item in IEnumerable<ISample> items)
{
    try
    {
        // Do stuff with item
    }
    finally
    {
        IDisposable amIDisposable = item as IDisposable;
        if(amIDisposable != null)
            amIDisposable.Dispose();  
    }
}

Not only is the code horrible, there will be a significant performance penalty in ensuring there is a finally block to dispose of the item for every iteration of that list, even if Dispose() just returns in the implementation.

Pasted the code to answer one of the comments in here, easier to read.

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But what if there are factories (ore simple usage of IoC-Container) that delivers implementation objects with or without the requirement of disposing them? You'll have to call Dispose() by casting and calling it explicitely. This way your code needs knowledge about the (possible) implementation... some kind of coupling? Otherwise you could just use a using block which is very easy. –  Beachwalker May 9 '12 at 11:19
    
@Stegi using block might not look ugly, but it will still have the performance penalty. Also I don't see how you'd use a using block inside of a foreach for example. Microsoft's code is litered with examples where it does this, IDisposable amIDisposable = object as IDisposable; if(amIDisposable != null) amIDisposable.Dispose(); Because as does not throw an exception if it can not cast it to an IDisposable, the performance penalty is near none existant. –  M Afifi May 9 '12 at 13:24
    
Even if only 1% of classes which implement or inherit from some particular type would do anything in IDisposable.Dispose, if it's ever going to be necessary to call IDisposable.Dispose on a variable or field declared as that type (as opposed to one of an implementing or derived type) that's a good sign that the type itself should inherit or implement IDisposable. Testing at run-time whether an object instance implements IDisposable and calling IDisposable.Dispose on it if so (as was necessary with non-generic IEnumerable) is a major code smell. –  supercat May 9 '12 at 20:39

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