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I have a byte array, for example 400 bytes.... and then a position of a bit, for example 6. How can I check if the value of this bit is 1? So in my example, the return value will be true.

example:

final byte[] b = new byte[] { 4, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
                0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 });

what is 00000100.... pos = 6 result = true

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3  
What have you tried? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 9 '12 at 10:17
7  
I can't understand the question –  keyser May 9 '12 at 10:18
    
if (b[position] == 1) return true; –  Dandy May 9 '12 at 10:18
1  
Are you sure you should not use a BitSet, which is precisely suited to the task you're trying to accomplish? docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/BitSet.html –  JB Nizet May 9 '12 at 10:19
    
Oli: nothing DANDY: you are wrong because b[6] return 0 not 1JB Nizet nope I have to use byte –  hudi May 9 '12 at 10:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It looks as if you count your bits like this:

Bit 1 is the highest bit of the first byte, bit 8 is the lowest bit of the first byte, bit 9 is the highest byte of the second byte and so on.

Then you can use:

private boolean isSet(int index) {
    int bitIndex = (index-1) % 8;
    int byteIndex = (index-1) / 8;
    int bitMask = 1 << 7-bitIndex;
    return (b[byteIndex] & bitMask) > 0; 
}

However, if you used (for me) a more natural way to index so that bit 0 was the lowest bit in the first byte, bit 7 the highest bit of the first byte, bit 8 the lowest but of the second byte (and so on) the the could would be:

private boolean isSet(int index) {
    int bitIndex = index % 8;
    int byteIndex = index / 8;
    int bitMask = 1 << bitIndex;
    return (b[byteIndex] & bitMask) > 0; 
}
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thx a lot it work I know that I count it vice versa because it is business requirement –  hudi May 9 '12 at 12:12

Since you count positions in the byte and in the Array backwards:

public boolean bitAtPos (byte [] b, int pos) {
  int el = b[pos/8];
  return ((el >> (8-(pos%8)) & 1) == 1);
}
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hm but your last row return int not boolean –  hudi May 9 '12 at 10:32
    
your answer is correct thx a lot. you just forget to compare this int with 1 –  hudi May 9 '12 at 10:53
    
@hudi: Oh, yes, you're right. Corrected. –  user unknown May 9 '12 at 11:07
    
hm so ry but your answer isnt correct too because when I have in byte array negative number as -128 what is 10000000 then this method doesnt work –  hudi May 9 '12 at 12:11
    
@hudi: Yes, I'm sorry, I was in a hurry. Corrected the bit-test. –  user unknown May 9 '12 at 15:51
boolean validateValue(byte[] array, int numberToValidate, int position) {
    return (array.length > position-1 && position >= 1) ? array[position-1] == numberToValidate : false;
}

This method helps you use it multiple time for any number you want to validate. Note: I added some pre-validation:
if you use an invalid position as a parameter it will return false. Best practice would be to throw an exception but I'll you deal with that.

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sorry but this answer is wrong because position is position of bit not byte. in my example b[5] return 0 not 1 as you expected –  hudi May 9 '12 at 10:37
    
Nevermind, I finally understood your question. Try stating you question better next time... –  Michael De Keyser May 9 '12 at 10:39
    
because b = 4,0,0,0,0,.. so b[5] = 0 –  hudi May 9 '12 at 10:41

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