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I'm trying to run a Clojure regex on a Groovy source file to parse out the individual functions.

// gremlin.groovy

def warm_cache() {
  for (vertex in g.getVertices()) {
    vertex.getOutEdges()
  }
}

def clear() {
  g.clear()
}

This is the pattern I'm using in Clojure:

(def source (read-file "gremlin.groovy"))

(def pattern #"(?m)^def.*[^}]")   

(re-seq pattern source)

However, it's only grabbing the first line, not the multiline func.

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3  
Doesn't groovy have AST classes? I mean, there's already a groovy parser--why not use it? –  Dave Newton May 9 '12 at 11:07
3  
You should never parse with regexps! Parse with parsers. –  SK-logic May 9 '12 at 11:09
    
Removed the antlr tag since I didn't see anything related to it in the question. –  Bart Kiers May 9 '12 at 11:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's your regex, not Clojure. You request to match def, then anything, then one char that is not equal to the closing brace. That char can be anywhere. What you want to achieve is this: (?sm)def.*?^}.

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Thanks Marko. What I'm trying to say is to match def, then anything until and including a brace as the first char of a new line -- so the nested } are ignored since they are not the first char on a new line (this is in a very controlled env so it doesn't have to be super fancy). –  espeed May 9 '12 at 10:40
    
I see. I don't think there's a way to express that in a regex, since ^ matches start of string only. It's just a special case that it can be used to match the start of a line, which is when the regex is used in non-multiline mode. You may try with matching an explicit newline char, but I found once that this is platform-specific and you'll need to match \r\n on Windows. –  Marko Topolnik May 9 '12 at 10:47
    
I thought Pattern.MULTILINE or (?m) tells Java/Clojure to accept the anchors ^ and $ to match at the start and end of each line (otherwise they only match at the start/end of the entire string). –  espeed May 9 '12 at 10:54
    
Correct, my bad. Confused it with ?s. Updating answer to propose a solution. –  Marko Topolnik May 9 '12 at 10:57
2  
isn't it (?sm)def.*?^} if you want the whole functions? –  tim_yates May 9 '12 at 11:09

As a demonstration of how you can grab the AST from the GroovyRecognizer, and avoid having the cope with trying to parse a language using regular expressions, you can do this in Groovy:

import org.codehaus.groovy.antlr.*
import org.codehaus.groovy.antlr.parser.*

def code = '''
// gremlin.groovy

def warm_cache() {
  for (vertex in g.getVertices()) {
    vertex.getOutEdges()
  }
}

def clear() {
  g.clear()
}
'''


def ast = new GroovyRecognizer( new GroovyLexer( new StringReader( code ) ).plumb() ).with { p ->
  p.compilationUnit()
  p.AST
}


while( ast ) {
  println ast.toStringTree()
  ast = ast.nextSibling
}

That prints out the AST for each GroovySourceAST node in the AST, giving you (for this example):

 ( METHOD_DEF MODIFIERS TYPE warm_cache PARAMETERS ( { ( for ( in vertex ( ( ( . g getVertices ) ELIST ) ) ( { ( EXPR ( ( ( . vertex getOutEdges ) ELIST ) ) ) ) ) )
 ( METHOD_DEF MODIFIERS TYPE clear PARAMETERS ( { ( EXPR ( ( ( . g clear ) ELIST ) ) ) )

You should be able to do the same thing with Clojure's java interop and the groovy-all jar file


Edit

To get a bit more info, you just need to drill down into the AST and manipulate the input script a bit. Changing the while loop in the above code to:

while( ast ) {
  if( ast.type == GroovyTokenTypes.METHOD_DEF ) {
    println """Lines $ast.line to $ast.lineLast
              |  Name:  $ast.firstChild.nextSibling.nextSibling.text
              |  Code:  ${code.split('\n')[ (ast.line-1)..<ast.lineLast ]*.trim().join( ' ' )}
              |   AST:  ${ast.toStringTree()}""".stripMargin()
  }
  ast = ast.nextSibling
}

prints out:

Lines 4 to 8
  Name:  warm_cache
  Code:  def warm_cache() { for (vertex in g.getVertices()) { vertex.getOutEdges() } }
   AST:   ( METHOD_DEF MODIFIERS TYPE warm_cache PARAMETERS ( { ( for ( in vertex ( ( ( . g getVertices ) ELIST ) ) ( { ( EXPR ( ( ( . vertex getOutEdges ) ELIST ) ) ) ) ) )
Lines 10 to 12
  Name:  clear
  Code:  def clear() { g.clear() }
   AST:   ( METHOD_DEF MODIFIERS TYPE clear PARAMETERS ( { ( EXPR ( ( ( . g clear ) ELIST ) ) ) )

Obviously, the Code: section is just the lines joined back together, so might not work if pasted back into groovy, but they give you an idea of the original code...

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awesome answer! –  fixitagain May 9 '12 at 12:24
    
Thank you, Tim -- this is a truly great answer. And this is what I planned on doing. A few days ago, I asked in the Groovy User Group how to do this but didn't get a response ( groups.google.com/d/topic/groovy-user/kvOv3t_O8ps/discussion ). –  espeed May 9 '12 at 15:20
    
@espeed Ahh, sorry I missed that, I usually check the groovy-user mailing list and here, but didn't realise there was a Google Groups thing as well ;-) Good luck with it! –  tim_yates May 9 '12 at 15:22

Short answer

(re-seq (Pattern/compile "(?m)^def.*[^}]" Pattern/MULTILINE) source)

From http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/regex/Pattern.html

By default, the regular expressions ^ and $ ignore line terminators and only match at the beginning and the end, respectively, of the entire input sequence. If MULTILINE mode is activated then ^ matches at the beginning of input and after any line terminator except at the end of input. When in MULTILINE mode $ matches just before a line terminator or the end of the input sequence.

You need to be able to pass in

Pattern.MULTILINE

when the pattern is compiled. But there is no option for this on re-seq, so you'll probably need to drop down into Java interop to get this to work properly? Ideally, you really should be able to specify this in Clojure land... :(

UPDATE: Actually, it's not all that bad. Instead of using the literal expression for a regex, just use Java interop for your pattern. Use (re-seq (Pattern/compile "(?m)^def.*[^}]" Pattern/MULTILINE) source) instead (assuming that you've imported java.util.regex.Pattern). I haven't tested this, but I think that will do the trick for you.

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