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I would like to get an instance of a static class, but I can’t seem to do this without implementing a singleton wrapper on a non-static class– is this possible, or am I missing something?

public class MyInstanceTester
 {
    public MyInstanceTester()
    {
        //this is how i get a reference to a singleton now
        MyClass instance1 = MyClass.Instance();
        //this is what is would like to do (if only the compiler would let me)
        MyStaticClass instance2 = MyStaticClass.Instance();
    }
}


public class MyClass
{
    private static MyClass _myInstance;

    static MyClass()
    {
        _myInstance = new MyClass();
    }


    public static MyClass Instance()
    {
        return _myInstance;
    }

}

public static class MyStaticClass
{
    public static MyStaticClass Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return this;
        }
    }
}
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4  
I don't think you can get an instance of a static class. I think that is the point of static class. Is it not? –  K'Leg May 9 '12 at 11:02
    
Yes you miss something. "this" has no meaning in a static method. Or to put it in other words: "this" is a null reference in static methods. The compiler does rightfully save you from trying to return null references. –  Alois Kraus May 9 '12 at 11:05
    
@AloisKraus The variable this does not exists in this context because its always the first argument of a method and the first argument of a static method is used for "user"-arguments. –  Felix K. May 9 '12 at 11:21
    
The get method of MyStaticClass Instance is static where he tries to return this. THIS will not work. The compiler will complain about this one. –  Alois Kraus May 9 '12 at 12:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as an instance of a static class. The singleton pattern simply returns the same instance of a class to repeated requests.

You may be getting confused by:

private static MyClass _myInstance;

This simply means that there will be a single instance of that particular object among all objects instantiated of the type that have _myInstance as a member.

A few notes:

  • The this keyword is not valid in a static member
  • If you have a static class then all members have to be static and so this will never be valid
  • A Singleton class cannot be a static class
  • Singletons declare a single static member to help ensure that only a single instance of that class exists
  • Note that a static reference to an object does not make the object static. Only the reference is static

Further reading: Jon Skeet has an excellent write up on implemeting Singletons in C# In Depth. I would suggest reading and studying this article until you grok it. It is quite good.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, you have answered the first part of my question perfectly: "There is no such thing as an instance of a static class". But to add some more context (see my comments on @felix-k response). What i am trying to achieve is: I have a bunch of static methods in a static class, i want to return a reference to these as an object - what's the best way to do that? –  PeteN May 9 '12 at 13:22
    
If you have a static class you reference it directly. References to static classes are not really returned they are accessed directly. I think all you're really looking for is a static class. Forget the Singleton pattern and use a static class like this: var result = MyStaticClass.SomeStaticFunction(); –  Paul Sasik May 9 '12 at 14:00
    
there in lies the issue, i cannot access it directly, i have to implement this interface IScriptedContentFragmentExtension to pass my object to an NVelocity template (similar to razor) as an object reference, the methods are then called from the object in the NVelocity template. –  PeteN May 9 '12 at 14:17
    
OK. A static class cannot implement an interface. It is not allowed. So the singleton pattern is fine here. What's the problem with your first example then? MyClass instance1 = MyClass.Instance(); –  Paul Sasik May 9 '12 at 14:21
    
i don't have a problem with my original MyClass instance1 = MyClass.Instance() solution, i just thought i might be missing a trick and there was a simple way to get a reference to a static class. Clearly i'm not, as you have pointed out "There is no such thing as an instance of a static class", thanks for the input –  PeteN May 9 '12 at 14:36

There is no reason to return a instance to a static class ( If the class is static there is no instance ).

You can access the class from everywhere, why returning a instance to it? I can't imagine any reason to do this.

Static class usage

To use a static class just write it like below:

MyStaticClass.MyMethod();
Int32 callCount = MyStaticClass.CallCount;

As you can see it doesn't even make sense to declare a variable because this would just look like this:

MyStaticClass msc = MyStaticClass.Instance();
msc.MyMethod();
Int32 callCount = msc.CallCount;

If you want to have a shorter name you just can use:

 using MSC = MyNamespace.MyStaticClass;
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hi @felix-k the reason for this is i am implementing an interface that returns an object, I want that object to be a reference to an existing static utility class that i have: public object InerfaceProperty { get { return MyStaticUtilityClass.Instance ; } } –  PeteN May 9 '12 at 12:45
    
@PeteN If i understand your correctly this is my answer: You can't implement a interface on a static type, so use the singletone-pattern to archive what you need. –  Felix K. May 9 '12 at 12:49
    
hi @felix-k , not sure you quite understand, nearly though, the interface is not mine, from a third party i have no control over it, it is being implemented on a non-static class, but one of the interface properties returns an object, i want that to return a reference to my static utility class (so as to expose it's methods to an NVelocity template) - so a slightly different scenario, although i imagine the answer is the same :) –  PeteN May 9 '12 at 13:00
    
@PeteN As mentioned above, you simply can't return a reference to your static class, the only way to archive this is to make it a singletone. Maybe you could update your answer with more information for other readers. –  Felix K. May 9 '12 at 14:15

From your comments I assume your solution would be:

Make your class non-static. (Just keep the methods static.)

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Your terminology is wrong. Please read the MSDN article on the static keyword.

A static member cannot be referenced through an instance. Instead, it is referenced through the type name.

A singleton is a class that only allows a single instance of itself. A common implimentation of this in C# is:

public class MyClass
{
    private MyClass _value = null;

    public MyClass Value {
        get { return _value ?? (_value = new MyClass()); }
    }
}
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The major problem is here:

public static class MyStaticClass 
{     
    public static MyStaticClass Instance
    {         
         get
             {             
                  return this; //compile time error!
             }
    }
}

this refers to an instance of a class which does not make sense in a static class as there can be no instance of one. This by itself should make you realize that there is a fundamental error in what you are asking: "I would like to get an instance of a static class". You can not return an instance of a static class as a static class by definition can not be instantiated.

The singleton pattern just makes sure that you always return the same instance of a class. But said class can never be static.

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