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I am designing a gui in visual c++ and there is a textbox where user inputs values so a calculation can be performed. How do I validate the input to ensure it can be cast to a double value?

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1  
Would checking if each digit is a number and there is zero or one period work? You could design a pretty small regex for that. Alternatively, a stringstream might be useful if you accept input that it does. –  chris May 9 '12 at 11:33
    
Note that depending upon the locale, the decimal point may be a comma, not a period. –  Pete May 9 '12 at 11:48
    
@Pete, good point. Still easily within a regex though. –  chris May 9 '12 at 11:50
    
If you use MFC - you may make use of DDX_Text. It converts from string to double, plus reports an error to the user if the conversion can't be done. –  valdo May 9 '12 at 11:51
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@Chris: it's not actually... you can easily have a regex for a comma or a period ([,\.] or however you'd escape it), but if you accept both then whichever one isn't allowed in your actual locale could still break something unexpectedly later (i.e. when you try to pass the value to a function that attempts actual conversion). –  Tony D May 9 '12 at 12:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since this seems to be a C++ CLI related question and your string from the textbox might be a .NET string, you might want to check the static Double::Parse method. For more portable solutions see the other answers...

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In any C++ environment where you have a std::string field and wish to check if it contains a double, you can simply do something like:

#include <sstream>

std::istringstream iss(string_value);
double double_value;
char trailing_junk;
if (iss >> double_value && !(iss >> trailing_junk))
{
    // can use the double...
}

As presented, this will reject things like "1.234q" or "-13 what?" but accept surrounding whitespace e.g. " 3.9E2 ". If you want to reject whitespace, try #include <iomanip> then if (iss >> std::noskipws >> double_value && iss.peek() == EOF) ....

You could also do this using old-style C APIs:

double double_value;
if (sscanf(string_value.c_str(), "%lf%*c", &double_value) == 1)
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You cannot "cast" a string to a double, you can only convert it. strtod function will return a pointer to the character within the string where the conversion stopped, so you can decide what to do further. So you can use this function for conversion AND checking.

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2  
Well, you could lexical_cast, which would probably be a good idea. –  Fred Larson May 9 '12 at 11:45
    
Unfortunately, strtod() returns 0 if the string could not be converted, making it awkward to distinguish this case from a true zero. Not impossible - you can check where conversion stopped, but beware of whitespace. –  Ian Goldby May 9 '12 at 11:47
    
@IanGoldby I suggested (maybe not explicitly enough) that the location of where conversion stopped should be used to decide whether it also succeeeded. Also, it (conveniently) discards leading whitespace. –  zvrba May 9 '12 at 11:56
    
@zvbra My comment about whitespace was specific to checking where the conversion stopped - so it was about trailing whitespace. –  Ian Goldby May 9 '12 at 12:00
    
@IanGoldby Yeah. In any case, it was unclear from the question whether trailing garbage was allowed or not. In the simplest case, I would just check whether *endptr==0. –  zvrba May 9 '12 at 12:47

I'd recommend Boost's lexical_cast, which will throw an exception if the conversion fails.

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Exceptions are not for program flow. You still need to validate the input without causing an exception if invalid inputs are not considered 'exceptional' events. –  Ian Goldby May 9 '12 at 11:54

Do you want to check the input whether it is double or not or after entering you want to perform double check on the input value?

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Any option would do. I just want to ensure that only double values are passed to the method for converting from string to double –  cobie May 9 '12 at 11:39
    
This should not be an answer, since you are not actually trying to answer the question (not yet, at least), but a comment to the question itself, asking for clarification. –  Gorpik May 9 '12 at 11:40
2  
@Gorpik, 1 rep can't comment. That's most likely why. –  chris May 9 '12 at 11:41
1  
@chris: Oh, I had forgotten about it, thank you. By the way, to whoever downvoted this answer: I don't think downvoting a newbie's answer just because he does not yet understand the way the site works is useful at all. –  Gorpik May 9 '12 at 11:43

As stated already, strtod(3) is the answer.

bool is_double(const char* str) {
    char *end = 0;
    strtod(str, &end);
    // Is the end point of the double the end of string?
    return end == str + strlen(str);
}

To address @Ian Goldby's concern, if white space at the end of the sting is a concern, then:

bool is_double(const char* str) {
    char *end = 0;
    strtod(str, &end);
    // Is the end point of the double plus white space the end of string?
    return end + strspn(end, " \t\n\r") == str + strlen(str);
}
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This example returns false if there is trailing whitespace. Not that there's necessarily anything wrong with that. –  Ian Goldby May 9 '12 at 11:56

Simply convert it to a double value. If it succeeds, the input is valid.

Really, you shouldn't be writing your own rules for deciding what is valid. You'll never get exactly the same rules as the library function that will do the actual conversion.

My favourite recipe is to use sscanf(), and check the return value to ensure exactly one field was converted. For extra credit, use a %n parameter to check that no non-whitespace characters were left over.

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