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The following python program creates a Tkinter Canvas object and draws random matrix on it. It also measures the time it takes to make 10 subsequent updates. As you may see from the output below, this time grows continiously and substantially during the course of the program. What is the reason for this behavior and how can I fix it?

from Tkinter import Tk, Canvas
import time
import numpy as np

window = Tk()
nRows = 30
nCols = 30
CELL_SIZE = 10
canvas = Canvas(window, width=CELL_SIZE*nRows,
                height=CELL_SIZE*nCols)
canvas.pack()
def drawbox(m):
    for y in range(nRows):
        for x in range(nCols):
            if m[y][x]:
                color = '#00FF00'
            else:
                color = '#000000'
            canvas.create_rectangle(CELL_SIZE*x,
                                    CELL_SIZE*y,
                                    CELL_SIZE*x+CELL_SIZE,
                                    CELL_SIZE*y+CELL_SIZE,
                                    fill=color,
                                    outline="#000000", width=1)
count = 0
timeStart = time.time()
while(True):
    board = np.random.rand(nRows, nCols) > 0.5
    if count % 10 == 0:
        print '%.1f seconds'%(time.time() - timeStart)
        timeStart = time.time()
        count = 0
    count += 1
    drawbox(board)
    canvas.after(5)
    canvas.update()

Here is the output

0.0 seconds
1.7 seconds
4.1 seconds
6.3 seconds
8.7 seconds
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You create new items at each updates. The canvas display all the rectangles you have previously added and thus go slower and slower (each update create 900 rectangles, after 30 you have 27,000 objects in your scene...)

To avoid this, you may create your rectangles once, and then only update their colors.

You could have at toplevel:

rectangles = [ [ canvas.create_rectangle (CELL_SIZE*x, CELL_SIZE*y,
                    CELL_SIZE*x+CELL_SIZE, CELL_SIZE*y+CELL_SIZE,
                    fill="#000000",outline="#000000", width=1) 
                 for x in range(nCols)] for y in range(nRows)]

and in drawbox:

canvas.itemconfig(rectangles[y][x], fill=color)
share|improve this answer

Every time drawbox is called in your program, you're creating a new set of rectangles and then drawing them on top of the old rectangles. As time goes on, you're drawing more and more rectangles (even though it doesn't look like it since the new rectangles are being drawn above the old ones). Also note that with the way your program is written, you're bleeding memory.

The way to fix this is to create the rectangles on the first go-around and then update them on the subsequent passes using canvas.itemconfig(rectangle_id,fill=color). I've posted an (ugly) modification to your drawbox below which accomplishes this.

def drawbox(m,_rectangles={}):
    if(_rectangles):
        myrectangles=_rectangles
    else:
        myrectangles={}

    for y in range(nRows):
        for x in range(nCols):
            if m[y][x]:
                color = '#00FF00'
            else:
                color = '#000000'
            if(not _rectangles):
                cid=canvas.create_rectangle(CELL_SIZE*x,
                                            CELL_SIZE*y,
                                            CELL_SIZE*x+CELL_SIZE,
                                            CELL_SIZE*y+CELL_SIZE,
                                            fill=color,
                                            outline="#000000", width=1)
                myrectangles[(y,x)]=cid
            else:
                canvas.itemconfig(_rectangles[(y,x)],fill=color)

    if(not _rectangles):
      _rectangles.update(myrectangles)
share|improve this answer

The canvas is known to be slow the more items you add (though it can typcially handle 1000's or 10's of 1000's without too much problem). You have a couple of problems. One, as other answers have pointed out, is that you keep creating more and more objects. By reusing the existing objects and updating their coordinates and colors you should see a dramatic improvement in speed.

The second problem is your infinite loop and your sleep (canvas.after(5)). There's a much better way to achieve the effect without the annoying side effect of your GUI freezing for 5 ms at a time.

All you need to do is create a function that draws or updates the objects, then puts an event on the queue to call itself again after some period of time. It will then automatically update without you having to explicitly create a loop.

For example:

def redraw():
    board = np.random.rand(nRows, nCols) > 0.5
    drawbox(board)
    canvas.after(100, redraw)
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