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I have a file that does not have an EOL at the end of the last line. I noticed this when my bash script that reads from it was not processing the last line.

I read from it like this:

while read LINE
do
    ...
done <thefile

The file is supplied to me, and so there is nothing I can do to it before it lands on my system (Linux - OpenSuSE 10.2). I do run dos2unix on the file, but that does not resolve the missing EOL.

I have seen a couple of solutions involving vi and ed, but they are a bit clunky and I was hoping there is a neater solution, maybe using sed, that I can use from within my bash script?

Oddly, when I vi the file and do a :set list, I can see a "$" at the end of the last line. I was expecting that to be missing as I thought that "$" represented \n. Or maybe there is a difference between newline and end-of-line?

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It's a bit unclear what your question(s) is/are. –  l0b0 May 9 '12 at 14:08
    
Interestingly POSIX requires a text file to have an EOL character at the end of every line. –  scai May 9 '12 at 15:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

sed -i -e '$a\' "path" will add a newline at EOF only if it doesn't already have one (explanation after the jump).

If you want to process a file which might have no newline at EOF, you have to check whether the read output variable exists after the loop:

while read LINE
do
    ...
done <thefile

if [ "${LINE+defined}" = defined ]
then
    ...
fi

Not very elegant, but at least you don't have to modify the input before processing it.

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1  
Thank you. The sed command is exactly what I was after. Although echo >>myfile works, it appends an EOL regardless of whether the last line already has one. –  user265330 May 9 '12 at 15:18

This will add a newline to the end of a file:

echo >> thefile
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This keeps adding newlines even if it already has one... –  l0b0 May 10 '12 at 10:30

Here's an option to add a newline to the end of the file if it doesn't already have one (and isn't blank):

if [ -s "$thefile" ] && [ "$(tail -c1 "$thefile"; echo x)" != $'\nx' ]; then
    echo >>"$thefile"
fi

Alternately, here's an easy way to modify the loop to process anything after the final newline:

while read LINE || [ -n "$LINE" ]
do
...
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1  
+1 I like the second option. –  Dennis Williamson May 9 '12 at 15:15

Several utilities add newlines at the end of the output. For example, you could use cut and do:

cut -b 1- < thefile | 
while read LINE; do ...; done

(Probably not all implementations of cut behave as I describe, but many do.)

Robert's solution is probably easiest, and if you can not actually change the file, you can do:

{ cat thefile; echo; } | while read ...

Note that putting the while in a pipe will put it in a subprocess and that may have an effect on the script (eg, assignments made in the loop will not persist), so you may need to use temporary files or named pipes to modify the data.

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[ -n "$l" ] could be replaced with [[ $l ]] in bash. [[ $l ]] is equivalent to [[ -n $l ]]. $l does not have to be quoted because word splitting and pathname expansion are not performed inside [[.

$ printf 'x\ny' | while IFS= read -r l; do echo "$l"; done
x
$ printf 'x\ny' | while IFS= read -r l || [[ $l ]]; do echo "$l"; done
x
y

$(tail -c1) is empty only if the file ends with a linefeed or is empty. $() removes a linefeed from the end, and tail -c1 is empty for empty files. -s tests if the file exists and is not empty.

f=/tmp/some\ file
[[ -s $f && $(tail -c1 "$f") ]] && printf \\n >> "$f"

sed -n p (no printing, print) is an alternative to sed '$a\'. BSD seds require -i '' instead of just -i.

sed -i '' -n p *.txt
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