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I have a combobox and have a list of things in it....the amount of things in the list is not set. It is gathering data from a folder and you can have an infinite (a little exaggeration) amount of items in the combobox...how do I know which option a user selects?

I tried the code below but it doesn't work. I'm brand new to C# and don't know what I'm doing wrong.

        comboBox1.SelectedIndex = 0;
        comboBox1.Refresh();

        if(comboBox1.SelectedIndex = 0)
        {
           //setting the path code goes here
        }
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winforms, wpf, asp.net webforms, silverlight, wp7, winrt? –  Daniel A. White May 9 '12 at 13:58
2  
Why did you set the SelectedIndex to 0? Don't need to do that nor refresh. –  Yorye Nathan May 9 '12 at 13:58
3  
@DanielA.White: While in most cases it is perfectly valid to ask for more detail, a quick look at the source code provided would have reveiled the obvious problem to the experienced programmer. While I support pointing people into the right direction, we should at least make sure to read the question and try to understand the problem. I currently notice a trend going towards reproving people instead of from the start trying to see their problem. –  Thorsten Dittmar May 9 '12 at 14:04
1  
I think there is a slight misunderstanding as to what exactly you are looking for here. Do you want to know which item is selected in the combobox, or do you want to know if the user has selected index 0? –  K'Leg May 9 '12 at 14:32
1  
@heinst Check out Rahul's answer then mine below. they should help you out. If not tell us where you are still having problems and I am certain we can help you out. –  K'Leg May 9 '12 at 14:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: Apparently I was going for the quick answer instead of good information, I am adding more info to make this easier to read

There is an event for the combobox that fires everytime the selection changes. in the designer select your combobox, then the events tab and double click SelectionChanged.

if you simply need to access what has been selected from lets say a button click you can use as Rahul stated

Button1_Click(...)
{ 
    MessageBox.Show(comboBox1.SelectedItem.ToString()); 
}

or if you simply want to access the text that is currently displayed in the combobox

Button1_Click(...)
{ 
    MessageBox.Show(comboBox1.SelectedText); 
}
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To compare values in C# you'll need to use "==" instead of "="

if(comboBox1.SelectedIndex == 0) 
{ 
   //setting the path code goes here 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
though it would always == 0 as not 5 lines before he sets it to 0, so that would always pass so no point even having an if statement XD –  RhysW May 9 '12 at 14:09
    
true, but we're all here to help each other out, one step at a time, no? :) –  bjornruysen May 9 '12 at 14:13
    
Yes, @RhysW, it is == 0, but he didn't write == 0 in his code - he wrote = 0, which is an assignment, which is not allowed in that form in the context of an if statement. –  Thorsten Dittmar May 9 '12 at 14:25
    
im familiar with basic operators...im pointing out that it WILL ALWAYS equal zero anyway because 3 lines before the if statement he changes it to 0... never said this code was wrong, just that it was redundant under the current situation –  RhysW May 9 '12 at 14:26
    
Yes. I'm just trying to make that clear, because all the other answers shoot over the target by miles. Of course it will always evaluate to 0 - but he's getting a compiler error, so he won't even get to that point yet :-) I did not mean to doubt your competence ;-) –  Thorsten Dittmar May 9 '12 at 14:28

Use ComboBox.SelectedItem Property.

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Why? This does not solve his problem. His problem is that he's using a = instead of a == to compare the selected index against 0 and this is not allowed. –  Thorsten Dittmar May 9 '12 at 14:27
    
@Thorsten , please realise that these answers were given before an edit he made, at the time these were relevant answers to give, please stop going from answer to answer posting this, you werent here to see the original post... –  RhysW May 9 '12 at 14:28
    
True, which is anyways answered but read his question again; his ask is: How to know what option or item user have selected from combox and I believe SelectedItem property is there just for that. –  Rahul May 9 '12 at 14:30
    
@RhysW: No, the code was there in the beginning. I was going to answer about the missing = when I realized that bjornruysen had already given the same answer. –  Thorsten Dittmar May 9 '12 at 14:30
    
@Thorsten please tell me what the title of his question is, its linked to knowing which combo box is selected is it not? –  RhysW May 9 '12 at 14:32

When you're using the = operator, it sets the right hand side into the left hand side, and the result is the right hand side (which also sets the left hand side).

When you're using the == operator, it checks whether the right hand side equals the left hand side, and the result is a bool (true/false).

int i = 10;
int j = 40;

Console.WriteLine(i == j); // false
Console.WriteLine(i); // 10
Console.WriteLine(j); // 40
Console.WriteLine(i = j); // 40
Console.WriteLine(i); // 40
Console.WriteLine(i == j); // true

So in the beginning, you are setting the SelectedIndex to 0, which you probably don't want to do, because you want to know which index is selected by the user.

So if you're changing the SelectedIndex, you won't be able to know what the user selected.

The condition you need is this:

if (comboBox1.SelectedIndex == 0)
{
    // Selected item is item 0
}

When you're doing this:

if (comboBox1.SelectedIndex = 0)
{
}

What actually happens is that SelectedIndex is set to 0, and then the compiler tries to cast 0 to a boolean (because it is inside an if condition), which will result with a compilation error.

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1  
Wrong if. It has to be "==" not "=" –  Raubi May 9 '12 at 14:00
    
@Raubi Typo, thanks for that. –  Yorye Nathan May 9 '12 at 14:01
    
While you are correct, I don't think this addresses his question at all. The OP's original code was all wrong, and picking one minor part of it to focus on almost seems pointless. That code would not even compile which leads me to believe it is simply a typo –  K'Leg May 9 '12 at 14:13
    
@K'Leg The only code that won't compile is the last piece of code, and I mentioned it won't compile. I was explaining what the problem actually was with that code. –  Yorye Nathan May 9 '12 at 14:39
    
@YoryeNathan I meant nothing by it, except I found people were focusing on this, which to me is so minor it is irrelevant, beacause it wont compile he will discover it himself. But later on the OP commented that it wont compile so now I believe he truly is that much of a rookie that maybe he would not discover this on his own and it is good that you mentioned it –  K'Leg May 9 '12 at 14:41

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