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What is the problem of this program when I execute , I want class be destructed, but end of the program I see the error box after cout fetch. What is the problem?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class user {

    public:int internal;
    public:user(int point) {
               internal = point;
           };

           ~user () {
               cout << "Fetch";
           }
    };



void main() {
    user gil(5);
    user * p;
    p=&gil;
    delete p;
    getchar();
}
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2  
General rule: for each new, exactly one delete. For each new[], exactly one delete[]. You have more deletes than news. –  Robᵩ May 9 '12 at 14:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class user 
{
public:
  int internal;
  user(int point) 
  {
    internal = point;
  }

  ~user() 
  {
    cout << "Fetch" << endl;
  }
};

int main() 
{
  user* p = new user(5);
  cout << p->internal << endl;
  delete p;
  return 0;
}

To avoid using new/delete and have the variable destructed when it falls out of scope:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class user 
{
public:
  int internal;
  user(int point) 
  {
    internal = point;
  }

  ~user() 
  {
    cout << "Fetch" << endl;
  }
};

int main() 
{
  user p(5);
  cout << p.internal << endl;
  return 0;
}
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@Bill Do heed the other answers and comments as they provide very good insight into the cause of this problem. Keeping them in mind when you are programming will save you many head aches. –  Drise May 9 '12 at 14:27
4  
Tempting to -1 for recommending new/delete rather than just using automatic variables. –  John Dibling May 9 '12 at 14:35
    
@JohnDibling I have added the alternative method that you seemed concerned about. –  Drise May 9 '12 at 15:39

Calling delete on a pointer that was not received from new is undefined behaviour. IOW, your code is wrong, don't do that, gil has automatic storage and will be destroyed automatically (duh) anyway.

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Your code has an Undefined behavior. You are calling delete on a pointer not allocated with new.
Once you have an Undefined behavior all bets are off and any behavior is possible.

Objects on automatic(stack)storage are deallocated once the scope{ } in which they are created ends, there is no need to call delete for them.

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Class you created will be destructed automatically because it's allocated on stack. You don't need to use delete operator on it. But if you just want to call destructor function you can do that:

gil.~user();

However I don't recommend that.

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good choice i wanted to do that –  Ali Torabi May 9 '12 at 14:23
    
@BillGates: No, you don't. You might think you do, but you don't. –  John Dibling May 9 '12 at 15:05

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