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I have created a thread running a certain method. But sometimes I would like to kill the thread even if it is still working. How can I do this? I tried Thread.Abort() but it shows up a messagebox saying "Thread aborted". What should I do?

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32  
Did you read the "remark" section on the MSDN? NEVER USE ABORT. IT IS INTENDED AS LAST RESORT. IF YOU USE THREAD.ABORT, SKY MAY FALL DOWN, AND KITTEN WILL BE KILLED. –  J-16 SDiZ Jun 27 '09 at 2:27
    
Kitten? I thought it was the chicken :) But your profile pic explains your comment! –  Rashmi Pandit Jun 27 '09 at 10:10
3  
As others have said, do your best to never do this; you should try to never create a thread that does something that you cannot control. If you have to kill running code that you cannot control, the safest thing to do is to run the code in another PROCESS, not another THREAD. It is a lot safer to take down a process than a thread. –  Eric Lippert Jun 27 '09 at 16:34

7 Answers 7

Do not call Thread.Abort()!

Thread.Abort is dangerous. Instead you should cooperate with the thread so that it can be peacefully shut down. The thread needs to be designed so that it can be told to kill itself, for instance by having a boolean keepGoing flag that you set to false when you want the thread to stop. The thread would then have something like

while (keepGoing)
{
    /* Do work. */
}

If the thread may block in a Sleep or Wait then you can break it out of those functions by calling Thread.Interrupt(). The thread should then be prepared to handle a ThreadInterruptedException:

try
{
    while (keepGoing)
    {
        /* Do work. */
    }
}
catch (ThreadInterruptedException exception)
{
    /* Clean up. */
}
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5  
Using exception handling to control program flow is a horrible idea. Use a WaitHandle instead. –  Mark Seemann Jun 27 '09 at 6:11
3  
I don't think it's that horrible. If your loop is not tight enough and it might take 30 seconds of processing before it finally knows that it should exit, an exception is the perfect way to stop it. –  Jimbo Apr 29 '10 at 17:59
5  
Mark, what if your thread is blocking for input and you need to make it stop somehow? It can block indefinitely, so Interrupting it and handling the exception is about the only way you can make it exit. –  Lirik Sep 3 '10 at 0:10
    
@Lirik Then you should be using the non-blocking versions, or cancel-able async calls. Think select() in Unix. –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 12 '13 at 6:32

You should really only call Abort() as a last resort. You can use a variable to sync this thread instead:

volatile bool shutdown = false;

void RunThread()
{
   while (!shutdown)
   {
      ...
   }
}

void StopThread()
{
   shutdown = true;
}

This allows your thread to cleanly finish what it was doing, leaving your app in a known good state.

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The most correct and thread-safe way is to use a WaitHandle to signal to the thread when it's supposed to stop. I mostly use ManualResetEvent.

In your thread, you can have:

private void RunThread()
{
    while(!this.flag.WaitOne(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(100)))
    {
        // ...
    }
}

where this.flag is an instance of ManualResetEvent. This means that you can call this.flag.Set() from outside the thread to stop the loop.

The WaitOne method will only return true when the flag is set. Otherwise, it will time out after the specified timeout (100 ms in the example) and the thread will run through the loop once more.

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1  
The downside of your implementation is that on each loop you gonna wait for the event, doing nothing. I'd rather to the contrary. Having a flag that indicate to shutdown and signal that the tread have end the execution. while (!WillTerminate) {..} HasTerminate.Set(); –  mathk Jul 30 '12 at 10:15

It is not a good idea to kill a thread. It is better to signal that it should stop and let it end gracefully. There are various different ways of doing this.

  • Use Thread.Interrupt to poke it if it is blocked.
  • Poll a flag variable.
  • Use the WaitHandle class to send a signal.

There is no need for me to rehash how each method can be used since I have already done so in this answer.

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3  
-1? I stand behind my answer. –  Brian Gideon Jul 25 '11 at 1:50
2  
+1. can you supply a simple example killing/stopping a thread via wait handle ? –  Royi Namir Jul 23 '12 at 7:47
I agree to Jon B
volatile bool shutdown = false;

void RunThread()
{

try
{
    while (!shutdown)
    {
        /* Do work. */
    }
}
catch (ThreadAbortException exception)
{
    /* Clean up. */
}
}

void StopThread()
{
   shutdown = true;
}
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Aborting a thread is a very bad idea, since you cannot determine what the thread was doing at the time of the abort.

Instead, have a property that the thread can check, and that your external code can set. Let the thread check this boolean property when it's at a safe place to exit.

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There are also examples of killing threads in my WebServer class...

https://net7ntcip.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/89621#1752948

I would say Abort is okay just understand what the ramifications are... as long as you are indicating state before a long running task Abort will work but flags are required such as (ShouldStop or ActionBranch etc)

Check it out for examples!

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