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In Java while I am creating threads and sharing an object there are times when I will want to have threads accessing the same object method, but I don't what them to do it at the same time. So, to avoid this I will define the object method as a Synchronized method as shown below.

Synchronized Instance Method:

class class_name { synchronized type method_name() { \statement block } }

All the statements in the method become the synchronized block, and the instance object is the lock. This means that if I tell a thread to use this method, it will wait till the previous thread has finished using the method. Is there a way to do this in Perl?

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3 Answers 3

Create a mutex in the constructor.

sub new {
   ...
   my $mutex :shared;
   $self->{mutex_ref} = \$mutex;
   ...
}

Lock it when you enter the method.

sub method {
   my ($self) = @_;
   lock ${ $self->{mutex_ref} };
   ...
}

Demo:

use strict;
use warnings;
use threads;
use threads::shared;
use feature qw( say );

sub new {
   my ($class, $id) = @_;
   my $mutex :shared;
   return bless({
      mutex_ref => \$mutex,
      id        => $id,
   }, $class);
}

sub method {
   my ($self) = @_;
   lock ${ $self->{mutex_ref} };
   say sprintf "%08X %s %s", threads->tid, $self->{id}, "start";
   sleep(2);
   say sprintf "%08X %s %s", threads->tid, $self->{id}, "end";
}

my $o1 = __PACKAGE__->new('o1');
my $o2 = __PACKAGE__->new('o2');

for (1..3) {
   async { my ($o) = @_; $o->method() } $o1;
   async { my ($o) = @_; $o->method() } $o2;
}

$_->join for threads->list();
  • No two calls to $o1->method run simultaneously.
  • Calls to $o1->method and $o2->method can run simultaneously.

Actually, if you're going to share the object anyway —this was done by passing the object as an argument to async int he above code— you could use the object itself as the lock.

sub new {
   my ($class, ...) = @_;
   return shared_clone(bless({
      ...
   }, $class));
}

Lock it when you enter the method.

sub method {
   my ($self) = @_;
   lock %$self;
   ...
}
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It was already very simple, but I just added how to make it even simpler. –  ikegami May 9 '12 at 22:19
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You could use semaphores to signal between the threads, or lock a shared object when the method in question is called, causing any subsequent calls by other threads to block until the locking thread completes that method call.

Before starting threading in perl I can highly recommend reading through perl thread tutorial as perl's threading is different to other languages

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The old perl threading model (from 5.005) supported an attribute :locked that more-or-less does what you want. However, for the current ithreads model (5.8 onward), you can re-introduce a similar attribute.

This is essentially @ikegami's simplified solution, hidden behind the syntactic convenience of Attribute::Handlers:

package Local::Sub::Attribute::Synchronized;
use strict;
use warnings;
use thread::shared;
use Attribute::Handler;

sub Synchronized : ATTR(CODE) {
  my (undef, $sym, $code) = @_;
  #
  # Lock the first argument (assumed to be a shared() object), then call $code
  # with the original @_
  #
  no warnings 'redefine';
  *{$sym} = sub { lock($_[0]); &$code; };
}

sub import {                              # Make :Synchronized available to our importer.
  my $callpkg = caller;                   # The usual technique is defines a UNIVERSAL::
  no strict 'refs';                       # handler, but I find that a bit ham-fisted.
  push @{"${callpkg}::ISA"}, __PACKAGE__;
}

Allowing you to write your classes like so:

package Foo;
use threads::shared;
use Local::Sub::Attribute::Synchronized;

sub new { shared_clone(...); }     # N.B.:  Your Foo object must be shared!

sub method_name : Synchronized {
  ...
}

And your code like so:

$foo_object->method_name();  # Don't worry, it's synchronized!
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