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In some C++/CLI code I have a native class which has a factory method GetWrapper() for creating its own managed .NET wrapper object. Internally, it holds a weak reference to its wrapper via GCHandle. When GetWrapper() is called, the GCHandle is checked and either a handle to the existing wrapper is returned, or (if it does not point to an object anymore, because the old wrapper object has been destroyed by the Garbage Collector) a new one is created an returned.

// .h
class NativeClass
{
public:
    WrapperClass^ GetWrapper();
private:
    WrapperClass^ GetNewWrapper();
    GCHandle m_wrapperGCHandle;
};

// .cpp
WrapperClass^ NativeClass::GetWrapper()
{
    if(m_wrapperGCHandle.IsAllocated)
    {
        try
        {
            WrapperClass^ wrapper = nullptr;
            wrapper = dynamic_cast<WrapperClass^>(wrapperGCHandle.Target);

            if(wrapper == nullptr)
            {
                return GetNewWrapper();
            }
            else
            {
                return wrapper;
            }
         }
         catch(System::InvalidOperationException^)
         {
             return GetNewWrapper();
         }
    else
    {
        return GetNewWrapper();
    }
}

WrapperClass^ NativeClass::GetNewWrapper()
{
    WrapperClass^ wrapper = gcnew WrapperClass(/*some args*/);
    m_wrapperGCHandle = GCHandle::Alloc(wrapper, GCHandleType::Weak);
}

The strange thing now is that m_wrapperGCHandle.IsAllocated always returns true, even if the wrapper has been garbage-collected. The MSDN tells to "Use this property when using Weak handles to determine if the GCHandle is still available.". But it's always true. If it's not available then the Target is a nullptr instead.

Am I missing something or is the MSDN wrong?

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There is an implicit threading-race in your code. The GC may run right after you tested IsAllocated. –  Hans Passant May 11 '12 at 14:02
    
@HansPassant Yes, it's currently not thread-safe –  Sebastian Negraszus May 11 '12 at 14:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My read of the MSDN doco is that m_wrapprGCHandle.IsAllocated will return true until m_wrapperGCHandle.Free is called - the IsAllocated property is checking for the state of the handle rather than the state of the reference held by the handle.

As you have noted, m_wrapperGCHandle.Target is null when the object has been garbage collected. I have used a similar method to what you have in your example code to generate managed wrapper classes, and I always check to see if Target is null and regenerate the wrapper object if Target is null.

Also, a suggestion ... it looks to me as if you have a handle leak in your code because you are calling GCHandle::Alloc without a corresponding m_wrapperGCHandle.Free call. Try putting the call to Alloc in the class constructor and the call to Free in the destructor:

NativeClass::NativeClass()
{
    m_wrapperGCHandle = GCHandle::Alloc(nullptr, GCHandleType::Weak);
}

NativeClass::~NativeClass()
{
    m_wrapperGCHandle.Free();
}

then your GetNewWrapper method is simply:

WrapperClass^ NativeClass::GetNewWrapper()
{
    m_wrapperGCHandle.Target = gcnew WrapperClass(/*some args*/);
}

and you can remove the if(m_wrapperGCHandle.IsAllocated) - else chain from the GetWrapper method.

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