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My understanding about javascript has always been that code executes sequentially, so the next line isn't executed until the one above it executes.

I have something like the following that I was trying to use to try and save a series of question one at a time.

    for(var i = 1; i <= assessment_question_count; i++)
    {
        if(valid)
        {
            var sort = i;
            $.ajax(
            {
                type: "POST",
                url: '/assessmentquestion/create',
                data: 'assessment_id=' + assessment[1] + '&question_text=' + $('#assessment_question_text_' + sort).val() + '&assessment_question_type_id=' + 
                    $('assessment_question_type_' + sort).val() + '&sort_order=' + i,
                success: function (str) 
                {
                    var result = str.split('|');
                    if (result[0] == 'success') 
                    {
                        var message = '<br />Question saved ';
                        update_display_message(message);
                    }
                    else if(result[0] == 'fail')
                    {
                        valid = false;
                        var message = '<br />Error saving question ';
                    }
                    else 
                    {
                        valid = false;
                        var message = '<br />Error saving question ';
                    }
                }
            });
        }
    }

The problem I'm running into is it seems to go onto the next loop as soon as it makes the ajax call, not waiting for it to complete. Is there a way to modify this so it doesn't try the next question until the previous updates?

Edit: I'm thinking maybe stick it in a recursive method that keeps calling itself until it's done.

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2  
I guess the bigger question is why arn't you rolling up all of the questions in to a single JSON payload and sending it to the server in a single AJAX reqest? –  Nick Bork May 9 '12 at 15:37
    
@NickBork I hadn't thought about that, after looking at it that seems like the best approach. If you put that as an answer I'll mark it accepted. –  Jhorra May 9 '12 at 17:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Often times it is best to reduce the number of round trips to the server to complete a task. In your case, sending X number of requests while waiting for a response before completion is likely a bad user experience.

In my opinion it would be best to seralize your data in to an array or JSON and then post the collection set as a single data entity, do validation and send back a JSON response with all of the validation errors and/or messaging neeed.

While this may add to the client side coding you'll need to do it will provide for a much more reliable UI and a better user experience.

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I ended up doing this and it worked great. –  Jhorra May 10 '12 at 1:51

By default, ajax works asynchronously.

Set async to false to prevent this.

$.ajax(
            {
                type: "POST",
                url: '/assessmentquestion/create',
                async: false,
                etc...
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1  
hence asynchronous javascript and xml –  alexfreiria May 9 '12 at 15:36
    
@Xander Indeed :) –  Curt May 9 '12 at 15:38
    
+1 for not giving your two cents with regards to whether the OP's approach is advisable or not! –  alexfreiria May 9 '12 at 15:42
    
@Xander I'm always happy to have someone tell me I'm doing it wrong. That's why I come here, so many smarter people than me. –  Jhorra May 9 '12 at 17:07

XMLHttpRequests are async by default in the browser. If you REALLY want to, you can make it synchronous by setting async: false in your ajax options, but this isn't advisable as this will lock up the entire UI - pretty much nothing else is going to happen until that request comes back.

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Yes. By calling $.ajax(), you are setting a callback (success) which will be called when the data comes back. No need to wait in between; you'll be interrupted, so it goes to the next loop.

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The problem is ajax calls happen asynchronously hence the name, add the following to your ajax call:

async : false 
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