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I've been reading the parted man page but can't seem to find any documentation on valid parameters. I'm trying to partition a USB CompactFlash with specific partitions sizes (regardless of CF size). But I'd like to make sure that my alignment is perfectly correct and optimal.

For example, when I use the following commands:

parted -s -a optimal $DEV mkpart primary ext3 1 1600
parted -s -a optimal $DEV mkpart primary ext3 1600 3200
parted -s -a optimal $DEV mkpart primary ext3 3200 3600

It's not clear if the first partition start should be 1 or 0? The only hint that I get that it should start with a 1 rather than a zero is when I run:

parted /dev/sdc align-check optimal 1

Which tells me it is aligned when starting with 1 and not aligned when starting with 0. But when I start with a 1 and I do a 'print', the start is at 1049kB... is this normal? When I dump the print partitions that were created by other tools, I see that they start at 32kB. If I use a start of 0, it prints a start of 512kB. Which is correct, I don't know!

Additionally, I've seen many examples all over the web of people using their start value for the second and third partitions as their ending value of the partition preceding it (ie: 1600 and 3200 values). Are we suppose to have an overlap or increment by 1? The man pages say nothing about this. And I've seen some web pages where they say its an error for the start to be of the same value of the last end.

When I use the '-a optimal', it does not seem to even affect my partition. Not using the alignment flag seems to produce the same result. What purpose is this for? Is there something I'm missing?

I really wish parted would be a lot more intelligent and not require a start, but rather could deduce it itself. Actually many people seem to need this exact feature, so I'm not the only odd ball with this need. Hopefully some geek out there will see this need and actually add it as a feature.

Note that I'm using parted in an automated build script, which is why I use the '-s' flag.

If anyone can enlighten me on this I would greatly appreciate it... thanks in advance!

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closed as off topic by casperOne Sep 3 '12 at 3:46

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1 Answer

I think you've made a couple of interesting questions right here, what a pity nobody has answered them before, so I'll try to do it.


It's not clear if the first partition start should be 1 or 0?

The first partition start must be 1, because the first bytes of a disk contain the Master Boot Record and the structure of some disk labels, such as MS-DOS. So if you use a value of 0 as first partition start, libparted will leave a few bytes at the beginning of the disk for allow this contents, placing the start of the partition immediately after the first sector.


the start is at 1049kB... is this normal?

It's normal. For explain this, first you must know that, for libparted, a kilobyte is not equal to 1024 bytes, instead, is equal to 1000 bytes.

KB = KiloByte = 1000Bytes
KiB = KibiByte = 1024Bytes

More information:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte
http://www.gnu.org/software/parted/manual/html_node/unit.html

The partition offset is in KB(kilobytes) and its value is an approximation, if you change the unit to bytes:

parted /dev/sdf unit b print

you'll see the real value: 1048576B this is, 1MiB (1048576B ~= 1049KB), exactly what you wanted.


I see that they start at 32kB

Yes, the partition starts at 32KB because the tool you're using is probably too old, and you're using a disk with 512-bytes sector size. The actual starting offset of the partition probably be 32256 that corresponds to sector 63 . Years ago, the partitioning tools place the start of the first partition at the 63rd sector, for align it to the old CHS geometry. This is too long to explain, but I recommend that you read this links for more detailed information:

http://superuser.com/questions/352572/why-does-the-partition-start-on-sector-2048-instead-of-63 http://lwn.net/Articles/377895/


If I use a start of 0, it prints a start of 512kB

I think it prints the start at 512B, not KB, am I wrong?
In your disk of 512-bytes sectors, the first sector ends at the offset 511, so like I told you above, the first partition begins after the first sector.


Are we suppose to have an overlap or increment by 1?

I you change the unit to bytes, you'll see the actual placement of the partitions and can check that they don't overlap.


What purpose is this for? Is there something I'm missing?

That is because, by default, parted works with MiB. When you type:

parted -s -a optimal $DEV mkpart primary ext3 1 1600

You're asking parted for create a partition between the offsets corresponding to the MiB #1 and #1600. The offsets aligned to MiB are always aligned for the best performance, so it's not necessary to specify -a optimal. If you change the unit to bytes you can create a non-aligned partition:

parted $DEV unit b mkpart primary 1000000 160MB
parted $DEV align-check optimal 1

It have shown the error: The resulting partition is not properly aligned for best performance.

So, try to do the same with -a none option:

parted -a none $DEV unit b mkpart primary 1000000 160MB

Now there's no error, this is the purpose of this option.


I really wish parted would be a lot more intelligent and not require a start, but rather could deduce it itself.

I think that feature would be implemented by any tool that uses libparted, but I think is not necessary in the library... but who knows? maybe some libparted developer is listening... have you tried to send a bug report? bug-parted@gnu.org

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