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Consider that I have a standard generic class, as shown below:

class Attribute<T>{
  public String name;
  public T value;
}

Is it possible to restrict the types to a certain predefined set, for example, consider that I would only want to have available, Attributes, of: String, Integer, Boolean, Byte[].

So this is kind of a ‘semi-generic’ class.

If this is not possible, what would be the best design to implement this?

Perhaps something like this exists in other libraries, where I could adopt the same kind of design. The intention here is that this will be part of an API, so I want to make it as intuitive as possible for users.

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marked as duplicate by assylias, Erick Robertson, Perception, allprog, Matsemann Mar 6 '14 at 18:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
An aside: In C++ something like this is generally called a 'concept'. It specifies a set of constraints on a type. You just rely on your compiler to figure out where the concept is violated (with suboptimal error messages). Maybe the same works in Java. –  pmr May 9 '12 at 16:40
    
@pmr: Off-topic, Is that what is referred to as partial specialization? –  Everyone May 9 '12 at 17:13
1  
@Everyone No, partial specialization means that a template (generic) acts differently when instantiated with a special type. –  pmr May 9 '12 at 19:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Semi-Reasonable: put all these in the same package:

public class Attribute<T> {
   Attribute() {
   }
}

public class StringAttribute extends Attribute<String> {
   public StringAttribute() {
       super();
   }
}

public class IntegerAttribute extends Attribute<Integer> {
   public IntegerAttribute() {
       super();
   }
}

By having the constructor have no access modifier it makes it package protected, so the only subclasses would have to be in the same package. You then supply the exact subclasses you want to allow.

This is not perfect, but it's better than nothing.

Another option is nested classes with a private constructor:

public class Attribute<T> {
    public T value;

    private Attribute() { }

    public static class StringAttribute extends Attribute<String> {
        public StringAttribute() {
            super();
        }
    }

    public static class IntegerAttribute extends Attribute<Integer> {
        public IntegerAttribute() {
            super();
        }
    }
}

And to create:

Attribute<String> att = new Attribute.StringAttribute();
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It is not possible. You can only restrict the parameter type to a type, or a subtype of (all of) a set of types.

The only way I can think of to implement the kind of restriction you want is to use runtime type tests; e.g. at the point where a method is passed an instance of T.

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