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I'm running into a couple of snags getting RMI Servers to work properly on multi-homed machines. I've written a custom RMISocketFactory and I've tried implementing the client-side createSocket(String host, int port) method a couple of different ways. One way only works when the RMI server machine IS multi-homed, the other way only works when the RMI server machine is not. Here is my code for both createSocket method versions in my client-side RMISocketFactory implementation:

Works only when the RMI Server IS NOT Multi-homed:

@Override
public Socket createSocket(String host, int port) throws IOException{
    Socket s = new Socket(host,port);

    //Do some book-keeping here ...

    return s;
}

Works only when the RMI Server IS Multi-homed:

private TreeSet<String> validHosts = null;

@Override
public Socket createSocket(String host, int port) throws IOException{
    Socket s = null;

    try {
        s = new Socket(host,port);
        synchronized(this){
            if(validHosts == null) validHosts = new TreeSet<String>();
            validHosts.add(host);
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {}

    if(s == null && validHosts != null){
        synchronized(this){
            for(String h : validHosts){
                try {
                    s = new Socket(h,port);
                } catch (IOException e) {}
            }
        }
    }

    if(s == null){
        try {
            String h = RemoteServer.getClientHost();
            s = new Socket(RemoteServer.getClientHost(),port);

            synchronized(this){
                if(validHosts == null) validHosts = new TreeSet<String>();
                validHosts.add(h);
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {}
    }

    //No dice - throw an exception:
    if(s == null){
        TreeSet<String> set = new TreeSet<String>();
        set.add(host+"(orig)");

        synchronized(this){
            if(validHosts != null) set.addAll(validHosts);
        }

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(
            "Could not connect socket on port "+port+
            " to any of the following hosts: ");
        for(String h : set) sb.append(h+" ");

        throw new IOException(sb.toString());
    }

    //Do some book-keeping here ...

    return s;
}

Question

It would seem that if I could somehow tell if the server-side machine was multi-homed, then I could just wrap both sets of code in an if(serverIsMultihomed) ... else ... kind of statement. I do have the ability to get the actual machine name of the server within this call, but calling InetAddress.getAllByHostName(host) doesn't actually return all of the host's IP addresses, only ones that are visible to the NIC on the client's machine. So when createSocket(host,port) gets called with an IP address that isn't actually visible to the client, this is where I run into issues. Furthermore, setting the java.server.rmi.hostname to the IP address of the server that I want to use doesn't fix this problem, and would essentially forbid machines on different subnets that the server is connected to from establishing a link.

The short of it is, is there another way to get all of a host's IP addresses, visible or otherwise, from a different machine, or am I totally barking up the wrong tree here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you had a look at this Multihomed solution?

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Thanks so much, that did the trick for me! –  Ben Lawry May 9 '12 at 20:31

If the server has one IP address that's visible to everybody, which seems to be the only multihoming case that Sun considered, all you need to does set java.rmi.server.codebase to that address at the server JVM. No socket factories required at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, but in my case I've got the RMI server on a machine that has IP addresses on two different subnets, but machines on either subnet are incapable of communicating with each other. So in my case, the socket factory was necessary. RMI is a fantastic tool, but it doesn't mess around when it comes to its shortcomings... :/ –  Ben Lawry May 10 '12 at 14:26
    
@Ben Lawry Agreed. The curious thing is that this whole java.rmi.server.hostname malarkey is very largely unnecessary. They only had to write the local socket address into the stub on its way out of the exporting host. That would have addressed 99% of these situations, and use java.rmi.server.hostname for the remaining 1%. I did tell them that on the mailing list about 11 years ago, but a certain person got very shirty at the suggestion that it hadn't been completely thought through. –  EJP May 11 '12 at 9:50
    
You nailed it right on the head. It seems REALLY silly that the Java developers, in developing RMI with the express purpose of being used in distributed systems, totally left that out. They could fix it even now, it's not like the change would cause any problems. Would have saved me about 10 days of wailing and gnashing of teeth... –  Ben Lawry May 11 '12 at 15:40

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