Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just read another users question while looking for a way to compute the differences in two lists.

Python, compute list difference

My question is why would I do

def diff(a,b):
    b = set(b)
    return [aa for aa in a if aa not in b]

rather than doing

def diff(a,b):
    tmp = []
    for i in a:
        if(i not in b):
            tmp.append(i)
return tmp

edit: just noticed the second diff function actually returned the similarities. It should be correct now.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just from an algorithmic perspective, it takes O(n) to construct the set and O(n) to do the list comprehension (since testing if an element is contained in a set is O(1)). However in the second example, it would take O(n^2) to loop through both lists. So regardless of the programming language, the first approach is superior.

Also, list comprehensions in python are inherently faster than a for loop. This reduces the constant factor even more (and significantly so too). The reason why can be summarized in this post which I quote here:

The fact that list comprehensions can only be comprised of expressions, not statements, is a considerable factor, as much less work is required behind the scenes for each iteration. Another factor is that the underlying iteration mechanism for list comprehensions is much closer to a C loop than execution of a for loop.

share|improve this answer
1  
Good explanation of why the latter is O(n^2). Also, here's some timeit timings I did on the list comprehension vs for loop approach (list comprehensions are about twice as fast in my example): gist.github.com/2647005 –  Ben Hoyt May 9 '12 at 17:34
    
wow... that is some upsetting evidence. I'm implementing the first one for sure. –  Jake May 9 '12 at 17:42

The main difference between the two options is that the one that uses set is asymptotically much more efficient.

Under reasonably favourable conditions, looking up an item in a set can be done in O(1) time; looking up an item in a list requires O(n) time.

The second, less significant, difference is that one version uses a list comprehension while the other uses a for loop. List comprehensions tend to produce more compact code. They also tend to be more efficient (although if performance is a concern, the only way to get an accurate picture is by running benchmarks).

share|improve this answer

Using the set is usually faster because it only has to iterate b once, while your example has to iterate b once for each element in a.

share|improve this answer

List comprehension is generally regarded as more efficient than using regular list operations when creating a list. If memory is a concern, you may want to use a generator instead.

This provides a bit of information re performances of for-loops, map and list comprehension. @benhoyt also provided a useful link comparing loops vs list comprehension.

However, please note that if performance is a specific concern, it might be worth your while to time/benchmark your various options to select the best option for your specific requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
How much faster is a list comprehension in this instance? –  Gabe May 9 '12 at 17:20
2  
A list comprehension might be slightly faster than building a list with append, but not much. The real gain of sets over lists here is that elem in container is O(len(container)) if container is a list, but O(1) if container is a set. –  Ben Hoyt May 9 '12 at 17:23
    
@Gabe I added a link to my post that talks about for-loops vs map vs list comprehensions that might be helpful. –  Levon May 9 '12 at 17:30

I've done some tests:

test_lists.py

a = range(1, 1000)
b = range(2, 1002)

tmp = []
for i in a:
    if(i not in b):
        tmp.append(i)

test_set_list_comprehensions.py

a = range(1, 1000)
b = range(2, 1002)

b = set(b)
[aa for aa in a if aa not in b]

test_set.py

a = range(1, 1000)
b = range(2, 1002)
list(set(a).difference(set(b)))

And that's what timeit says:

~$ python -m timeit 'import test_lists'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.671 usec per loop
~$ python -m timeit 'import test_set_list_comprehension'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.766 usec per loop
~$ python -m timeit 'import test_set'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.656 usec per loop

So the best one seems to be:

test_set.py

a = range(1, 1000)
b = range(2, 1002)
list(set(a).difference(set(b)))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.