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How can improve this sort method to meet the following conditions:

  • exact matches returned first
  • partial matches follow exact matches
def find_me
  records = ["gogol", "garrison", "feathers", "grains"]
  sorted = []   

  print "what are you looking for? "
  term = gets.chomp.downcase    

  records.select do |record|
    if term == record.downcase
      #exact match
      sorted << record
    elsif  term[0] == record[0] or term[1] == record[1] or term[2] == record[2]
      #if the first three chars match add it
      sorted << record
    end
  end

  sorted.sort! {|b| term <=> b }
end
share|improve this question
    
The records.select really should be records.each and the or should be || for operator precedence reasons. Not an answer but a little advice. =) –  Charles Caldwell May 9 '12 at 17:55
    
Is it desired to match the first 3 characters for a partial match or is this just the best you came up with yet? –  Matt May 9 '12 at 17:58
    
And now that I'm looking at it, you can get the first three characters of a String with record[0..2] which does away with the need for all the or. Kind of looks like you weren't wanting the or anyway but rather an && but that is not needed. –  Charles Caldwell May 9 '12 at 17:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could make a note of which ones are exact matches and which are full matches:

matches = records.each_with_object([]) do |record, m|
  if term == record.downcase
    m << [ 0, record ]
  elsif term[0, 3] == record[0, 3]
    m << [ 1, record ]
  end
end

and then sort on both values and unpack the internal arrays:

matches.sort.map(&:last)

I'm not sure what you're expecting this sort to do:

sorted.sort! {|b| term <=> b }

but it is going to do strange things because the sort block is supposed to compare two elements of the array with each other and you're completely ignoring the second one; for example, this happens for me:

>> [4,2,1,2,4].sort { |x| 3 <=> x }
=> [4, 4, 1, 2, 2]

and the resultant ordering doesn't make much sense.


The each_with_object is doing several things at once:

  1. Find the exact matches and mark them as exact matches (the leading 0).
  2. Find the prefix matches and mark them as partial matches (the leading 1).
  3. Return the combined list to be stored in matches; e.each_with_object(m) hands m to the block as its second argument and returns m.

This leaves you with a matches that looks like this:

[ [0, a], [1, b], [1, c], ... ]

with a leading 0 indicating an exact match and 1 indicating a prefix match. Then you can let sort sort matches normally since Array#<=> compares arrays element by element; 0 comes before 1 so the exact matches end up being first. Then we can throw away the exact/partial indicators using map to call last on each of the inner arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
this answer works well and its very terse; took me awhile to understand it; can you clarify what each_with_object is doing with the ([]) –  rhodee May 9 '12 at 18:27
    
@rhodee: I added some explanation. –  mu is too short May 9 '12 at 18:52
    
thank you! I learned something new and I got something done +1 –  rhodee May 9 '12 at 21:00
def find_me
  records = ["gogol", "garrison", "feathers", "grains"]
  exact_matches   = []
  partial_matches = []  

  print "what are you looking for? "
  term = gets.chomp.downcase    

  records.each do |record|
    if term == record.downcase
      #exact match
      exact_matches << record
    elsif  term.slice(0, 3) == record.slice(0, 3)
      #if the first three chars match add it
      partial_matches << record
    end
  end

  # Just add the Arrays and it'll put the exact matches first and the 
  # partial ones last without a need for sorting. =)
  sorted = exact_matches + partial_matches 
end
share|improve this answer
1  
I think partial_matches should still get sorted first. Not sure why but it's part of the question. Also instead of term[0..2] == record[0..2] you could use term.slice(0, 3) == record.slice(0, 3) –  Matt May 9 '12 at 18:11
1  
slice does seem a little more readable. It is a good verb that explains exactly what is happening. I used the [] means because I do a lot of work with Ranges and think that way. The more readable method is better. Changing answer to reflect that. –  Charles Caldwell May 9 '12 at 18:17
    
@matt thanks for the solutions and helping me 'think' in Ruby terms. –  rhodee May 9 '12 at 18:28

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