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I tried to write a function, that get a number of candidates betwen 10 to 60,000, and gets a name for each candidate... This is what I wrote:

/********** Headers **********/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <conio.h>
/********** Consts **********/
const number_candidates;

/********** Functions **********/
void get_candidates(char *arr[256][256])
{
    int counter = 1, i = 0, j =0;
    int temp = 0;

    printf ("Please enter the number of candidates: \n");
    scanf ("%d", &temp);
    while (temp < 10 && temp > 60000)
    {
        printf ("Please enter the number of candidates: \n");
        scanf ("%d", temp);
    }
    const number_candidates = temp;
    while (counter < number_candidates + 1)
    {
        printf ("Please enter the %d name: \n", counter);
        fgets (arr, 256, stdin);
        counter++;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int i = 0;
    char can_names[256][256];

    get_candidates(&can_names);

    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

There is an error in getting the names into the arr...

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3  
while (temp < 10 && temp > 60000) <- while(0) would be easier :) –  Joe May 9 '12 at 18:08
    
what is the error exactly? Is it compile time or run time? If run time - can you give a test case where you get it? Is the "error" a bug, or an actual error from the OS (i.e. segfault)? –  amit May 9 '12 at 18:08
    
really? how are you planning to test this code :) ? –  Naveen May 9 '12 at 18:10
    
Theres no error, but it doesnt do what it suppost to do... after I called the function in the main I wrote: printf ("%s", can_names); and it only printed to me the last name that I've entered, insted of the X names.... –  user1390162 May 9 '12 at 18:28
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should avoid using arguments like this one: char *arr[256][256] ... what's the point of it? You should think about what your function will do. You want it to load names of candidates right? So you could define struct candidate with an attribute name within it:

typedef struct candidate{
    char name[256];
} Candidate;

Another thing: why are you passing an address of your array to this function? You just want your array to be filled with data, you won't work with an array itself, thus it's enough to pass an array, not an address of it.

Then prototype of your function could be changed to void get_candidates(Candidate* candidates) which is much easier to read. And look how simple can usage of this function become:

Candidate candidates[256];
get_candidates(candidates);

And last thing: before you write function like that, try something simpler first (to find out what's happening there). Here's an example:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct candidate{
    char name[256];
} Candidate;

void get_candidates(Candidate* candidates){
    scanf("%255s", candidates[4].name);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    Candidate candidates[256];
    get_candidates(candidates);
    printf("%s\n", candidates[4].name);
    return 0;
}

In case you don't know the count of candidates before calling get_candidates, then it's better to change the prototype of this function to Candidate* get_candidates() so that it's clear that this function creates an array:

// caller is responsible for calling free on return value
Candidate* get_candidates(){
    Candidate* candidates;
    int count = 50; // here you found out the count
    candidates = malloc(count*sizeof(Candidate));
    fgets(candidates[4].name, 255, stdin);
    return candidates;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    Candidate* candidates = get_candidates();
    printf("%s\n", candidates[4].name);
    free(candidates);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The struct is an excellent idea! but how can I make couple of structs, when I dont know how many will I need to make ? Also, what is the %255s in the scanf? (btw, our teacher doesnt allow us to use scanf for string, we have to use fgets only)... –  user1390162 May 9 '12 at 18:58
    
@AmitSegal: I've updated my answer. %255s specifies the width of this string so that it's maximum length is 255 characters. –  LihO May 9 '12 at 19:06
    
@AmitSegal: Use fgets(candidates[4].name, 255, stdin); instead of scanf("%255s", candidates[4].name); then. –  LihO May 9 '12 at 19:12
    
Why candidates[4] ? Also, how can I do it, if I dont know how many candidates I will have ? –  user1390162 May 9 '12 at 19:29
    
@AmitSegal: That was just an example showing some ideas and different approach to your problem. It's on you to finish this homework :) –  LihO May 9 '12 at 20:12
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You should call:

counter = 0;
...
fgets (arr[counter], 256, stdin);


You need walk one step for each loop.

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And... why is arr declared with 256 "strings"? To fill 60000-10 names (each name with 256 bytes), arr must be: arr[59990][256] –  André A. G. Scotá May 9 '12 at 18:41
    
Allright, thanks :) –  user1390162 May 9 '12 at 19:29
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Have a look at the documentation for scanf which indicates that variables need to be passed as a pointer as you did the first time you call scanf. Then have a look at your second call to scanf...

You're currently only assigning names to the first string in your array over and over again. Look at that while loop and in particular, how you're passing in the 'arr' variable. Have a look here for some inspiration.

To print out all of the names you need to loop over the array. You can find some examples of printing a list of strings here and here.

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A few things are wrong:

First, you need space for 60000 names, yet you only allocate enough for 256. OK, we change

char can_names[256][256];

to

char can_names[60000][256];

and get... a segmentation fault, probably. That's because the array is using too much stack space. Change it to

static char can_names[60000][256];

so it's not on the stack.


Second, there's no need to take the address of the array - it's already passed as a pointer. Your function call changes to

get_candidates(can_names);

and the function signature is

void get_candidates(char arr[60000][256])

Third, you need a loop to read the entries one at a time. A for loop is easier to read:

for (counter = 0; counter < number_candidates; counter++)
{
    printf ("Please enter the %d name: \n", counter);
    fgets (arr[counter], 256, stdin);
}

Fourth, the condition

while (temp < 10 && temp > 60000)

should be

while (temp < 10 || temp > 60000)

(how can a number be both less than 10 and greater than 60000?) Once this is fixed, you can remove the initial read of temp since the loop will run at least once. Note that if you type a letter instead of a number now, the program will go into an infinite loop (it will repeatedly read the letter). Fixing this is left as an exercise.


Fifth, you don't need any headers except stdio.h. Also, the i and j variables are unused.


Edit: missed the scanf error. scanf takes addresses as parameters. it makes sense too: scanf needs somewhere to store a value, it doesn't care about the current value. So the call to scanf should be:

scanf ("%d", &temp);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your comment! A few notes : * the fourth condition supposts to be ||, because when I changed it from && to ||, it didnt work well for me(I though as same as u, but no idea why did it happen )... * the fifth - I'll have more stuff to add, where I'll need those headers... :) –  user1390162 May 9 '12 at 19:01
    
It should work if you fix your scanf call as mentioned here. You can even delete the first read of the number of candidates. Since you initialize temp to 0, the loop will run at least once. –  Greg Inozemtsev May 9 '12 at 19:58
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Don't know if this would help but have a look at the code below. It works dynamically ie. it allocated memory for desired no of candidates rather than assuming 60,000 of them.

/*
 * Write a function, that get a number of candidates betwen 10 to 60,000, and gets a     name for each candidate 
 */

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAX 256

int main(int argc, char*argv[]){

int i,n;
char **s;

printf("Enter the total number of candidates\n");
scanf("%d",&n);

//error condition
if(n<10 || n>60000){        
    printf("Sorry number of candidates should be between 10 to 60,000\n");
    return -1;      
}

//allocate memory
s = malloc(sizeof(char*)*n);

//get the data
for(i=0;i<n;i++){

    s[i] = calloc(MAX,sizeof(char));
    printf("Enter the candidate number %d's name:\n",i+1);
    //fgets(s[i],MAX,stdin);
    scanf("%s",s[i]);

}

//Display the data
printf("\nDetails of all the Candidates\n\n");
for(i=0;i<n;i++){
    printf("Candidate number %d's name:%s\n",i+1,s[i]);
}

//Free the memory
for(i=0;i<n;i++){
    free(s[i]);
}
free(s);

return 0;

}

I had a problem with fgets it was skipping the first candidate info. Any help would be appreciated.. I tried flush(stdin) but did not solve the issue.

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Thanks a lot for ur comment! I had the same problem with fgets, and the solution is to put getchar()... It doesnt allways work, but when it is, it's awesome :) –  user1390162 May 10 '12 at 15:27
    
I have couple questions: why does the variable s, has a double ? I know that twice is a pointer on a pointer (not sure how to say it in english), but why do I even use it here ? Also, when allocating memory, u wrote (char)*n, which I dont understand really good why u did it... –  user1390162 May 10 '12 at 18:06
    
@AmitSegal char ** is a pointer to a pointer to a char. it is similar to char arr[60000][256] only difference is that here it does not assume an array of 60000 arrays of 256 characters rather allocates required memory on the fly. While allocating memory i wrote sizeof(char*)*n because s is a pointer to a pointer to a char. So it can only contain address of a pointer to a char. so allocating memory considering that only. For any more help feel free to contact me :) –  nimish May 11 '12 at 3:08
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