Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function that returns an iterator if an object is found.

Now i have a problem. How do i fix the problem of informing the object that called this function that the object was not found?

vector<obj>::iterator Find(int id, int test)
{
        vector<obj>::iterator it;
            aClass class;

            for(it = class.vecCont.begin(); it != class.vecCont.end(); ++it)
            {
               if(found object) //currently in psuedo code
               return it;
            }

            return ???? // <<< if not found what to insert here?

}

Do i need to change my data structure in this instead?

Thanks in advance! :)

share|improve this question
2  
If you have no particular reason for using your own, consider std::find. The way it's implemented though, is that it would return end(). –  chris May 9 '12 at 19:32
2  
This just seems like a design flaw. Return a copy, a pointer, a bool indicating the found status and modify an input instance via reference, but DON'T return an iterator to a hidden container! –  San Jacinto May 9 '12 at 19:35
    
find complexity is O(n). i am actually using a back end binary search to do the search. This is important as im implementing a very huge distributed system. –  mister May 9 '12 at 19:35
    
@dupdupdup But that iterator is only valid if the container is unchanged. This just seems like a bad idea. –  San Jacinto May 9 '12 at 19:36
    
thanks ahenderson! actually that temporary solves the problem. but yeah San jacinto, what you said is true. so i hope that you can give me an example of what you meant before? –  mister May 9 '12 at 19:37

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't return an iterator to a hidden container. Return simply what it is that you want, namely a means to access an object if it exists. In this example, I store the objects in the container via pointer. If your objects only exist temporarily, then new one up and copy the object over!

class AClass;

//...some time later
std::vector<AClass*> vecCont; //notice, store pointers in this example!

//..some time later
AClass * findAClass(int id, int test)
{
  vector<AClass*>::iterator it;

  for(it = class.vecCont.begin(); it != class.vecCont.end(); ++it)
  {
     if(found object) //currently in psuedo code
     return it;
  }

  return NULL;
}

//later still..

AClass *foundVal = findAClass(1, 0);
if(foundVal)
{
  //we found it!
}
else
{
  //we didn't find it
}

edit: the intelligent thing to do is to write a comparator for your class and use the std algorithms sort and to find them for you. However, do what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd like this if you had recommended using shared pointers. Introducing raw pointers here hurts my feelings. –  Rob I May 9 '12 at 22:44
    
My experience with shared/smart pointers has not been good in general. It's find for code isolated inside your own classes, but what happens to me (at least on my projects) is that I run into problems when code interfaces need to communicate with each other and need a raw pointer anyway. Also, you beg for objects to live longer than they should or else in inconsistent states because the destruction order isn't as easy to control. I find it simpler to just encapsulate pointers and make it known "this is mine. You're only borrowing it. Don't store it. Ask me permission before using it." –  San Jacinto May 10 '12 at 1:51
    
Don't give up on them! Your example sounds like a job for std::weak_ptr. In my opinion, using smart pointers of any kind is nearly always the way to go - think exception safety (RAII) for one. I agree that when dealing with interfaces you might get hosed, especially if the interfaces are to another product/API and you have no control. But it's still worth it, to me. –  Rob I May 10 '12 at 4:45

You can return an iterator to the end, i.e. return class.vecCont.end() to indicate that.

share|improve this answer

Return vector::end(), throw an exception, or return something other than a plain iterator

Better yet, don't implement your own Find function. That is what the <algorithm> library is for. Based on your psudocode, you can probably use std::find or std::find_if. find_if is particularly useful in cases where equality doesn't necessarily mean operator==. In those cases, you can use a [C++11] lambda or if C++11 isn't available to you, a functor class.

Since the functor is the lowest common denominator, I'll start with that:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;

class Person
{
public:
    Person(const string& name, unsigned age) : name_(name), age_(age) {};

    string name_;
    unsigned age_;
};

class match_name : public unary_function <bool, string>
{
public:
  match_name(const string& rhs) : name_(rhs) {};
  bool operator()(const Person& rhs) const
  {
    return rhs.name_ == name_;
  }
private:
    string name_;
};

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    vector<Person> people;
    people.push_back(Person("Hellen Keller", 99));
    people.push_back(Person("John Doe", 42));

    /** C++03 **/
    vector<Person>::const_iterator found_person = std::find_if( people.begin(), people.end(), match_name("John Doe"));

    if( found_person == people.end() )
        cout << "Not FOund";
    else
        cout << found_person->name_ << " is " << found_person->age_;
}

found_person now points to the person whose name is "John Doe", or else points to people_.end() if that person wasn't found.

A C++11 lambda is new language syntax that makes this process of declaring/defining a functor and using is somewhat simpler for many cases. It's done like this:

string target = "John Doe";
vector<Person>::const_iterator found_person = std::find_if(people.begin(), people.end(), [&target](const Person& test) { return it->name_ == target; });
share|improve this answer
    
I think an exception is indeed the correct choice if an iterator is not possible. (For instance because the caller doesn't know that it should compare to end() or if this is simply not visible to the caller.) –  TaZ May 9 '12 at 19:35

You should return class.vecCont.end() if the object was not found. But @chris is right - this is exactly what std::find is for.

share|improve this answer

How about just returning the end iterator?

Your code becomes:-

vector<obj>::iterator Find(int id, int test)
{
   vector<obj>::iterator it;
   aClass class;

   for(it = class.vecCont.begin(); it != class.vecCont.end(); ++it)
   {
     if(found object) //currently in psuedo code
       break;
   }

   return it;
}

or just use std::find.

share|improve this answer

Something like this

std::vector<obj>::iterator pos;
pos = find(coll.begin(),coll.end(), val);

And don't forget to these check for presence of your element or not in the container

if (pos != coll.end()) 
share|improve this answer

Never emulate std::algorithm functions inside a class. They are free functions for a reason. It usually is enough to expose begin and end member function that return the right iterators (and possibly a boost::iterator_range). If you need to do a fancy find with a functor, expose the functor as well.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.