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I am a budding C programmer and I wrote this program to count words for 2nd Edition K&R 1.5.4. Is there something wrong with my if statements? The code appears to increment a variable when it should not, because it doesn't meet the initial test.

#include <stdio.h>
#define IN 1
#define OUT 0


main()
{
      int word, state, c;

      word = state = OUT;

      while((c = getchar()) != EOF)
      {
               if(c != ' ' || c != '\n' || c != '\t')
               {
                    if(state == OUT)
                    {
                             word++;
                             state = IN;
                    }

                    /*else
                    {
                         state = IN;
                    }*/
               }

               if(c == ' ' || c == '\n' || c == '\t')
               {
                   state = OUT;
               }

               printf("char: %c %x | state: %d | word: %d\n", c, c, state, word); 
      }

      printf("\n//maniac: %d\n", word);

This results in:

>count_word_my.exe
Hello  he   he
char: H 48 | state: 1 | word: 1
char: e 65 | state: 1 | word: 1
char: l 6c | state: 1 | word: 1
char: l 6c | state: 1 | word: 1
char: o 6f | state: 1 | word: 1
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 1
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 2
char: h 68 | state: 1 | word: 3
char: e 65 | state: 1 | word: 3
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 3
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 4
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 5
char: h 68 | state: 1 | word: 6
char: e 65 | state: 1 | word: 6
char:
 a | state: 0 | word: 6

char:
 a | state: 0 | word: 7

//maniac: 7

The K&R code which I have modified:

#include <stdio.h>

#define IN 1 /* inside a word */
#define OUT 0 /* outside a word */

/* count lines, words, and characters in input */
main()
{
      int c, nl, nw, nc, state;

      state = OUT;
      nl = nw = nc = 0;
      while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
            ++nc;
            if (c == '\n')
               ++nl;
            if (c == ' ' || c == '\n' || c == '\t')
               state = OUT;
            else if (state == OUT) {
                 state = IN;
                 ++nw;
            }
            printf("char: %c %x | state: %d | word: %d\n", c, c, state, nw);
      }
      printf("%d %d %d\n", nl, nw, nc);
}

The K&R code results in:

>count_word_test.exe
Hello  he   he
char: H 48 | state: 1 | word: 1
char: e 65 | state: 1 | word: 1
char: l 6c | state: 1 | word: 1
char: l 6c | state: 1 | word: 1
char: o 6f | state: 1 | word: 1
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 1
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 1
char: h 68 | state: 1 | word: 2
char: e 65 | state: 1 | word: 2
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 2
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 2
char:   20 | state: 0 | word: 2
char: h 68 | state: 1 | word: 3
char: e 65 | state: 1 | word: 3
char:
 a | state: 0 | word: 3

char:
 a | state: 0 | word: 3
2 3 16
^C

How can my code be incrementing word/nw while it is processing the second space (0x20) after the 'Hello' when it doesn't meet the test in the first if statement? Even if it did reach the second if statement, I would assume that it would set the 'state' variable to 1(IN). I am missing something crucial here. I greatly appreciate any help that is given. Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

well, every char will evaluate this as true if(c != ' ' || c != '\n' || c != '\t') as no char is both ' ', '\n' and '\t'.

It should probably be:

if(c != ' ' && c != '\n' && c != '\t')
share|improve this answer
    
True, Unless you are using C++ and doing some evil operator overloading (muhahaha). –  Richard J. Ross III May 9 '12 at 19:41
2  
@RichardJ.RossIII - evil indeed, but this is K&R, and tagged C... –  MByD May 9 '12 at 19:42
    
Thank you Binyamin. I should have evaluated the logic in the code further instead of just making a false assumption. I corrected that portion of the source and the statement evaluates as I originally wanted. I'm already applying it to other exercises. This is a foundational lesson that will positively influence the rest of my programming, so thank you once again. –  user1271014 May 10 '12 at 15:31

You've already got (at least) one good answer (which I up-voted). But please let me elaborate "just in case":

if(c == ' ' || c == '\n' || c == '\t') ... You clearly understand this: if "space" or "newline" or "tab", then "whitespace == true".

... but ... if (c != ' ' || c != '\n' || c != '\t') ... says "if not a space ... or not a newline .. or not a tab"

In other words, '\n' would evaluate to "whitespace == false" ... because '\n' isn't a blank, and it isn't a tab.

What you really mean is if (c &= ' ' && c != '\n' && c != '\t') ... ... or if (!(c == ' ' || c == '\n' || c == '\t')) ...

In other words, the problem is less "C syntax" than "boolean logic".

Here are two brief tutorials "heavy on theory" ... but which you might enjoy:

share|improve this answer
    
paulsm4, thanks for explaining further. I'm putting these links in my bookmarks. The Boolean logic in the video is something I'll have to practice. It seems a little familiar to bitwise logic and some of the stuff I barely remember from a critical reasoning class. –  user1271014 May 10 '12 at 15:52

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