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Cliffs: Is there a known pattern for passing a standard "filter" type to a stored procedure to encapsulate stardate/enddate/pagesize/pagenum parameters?

Not sure the correct place for this question. I'm exploring the idea of passing a filtering object parameter to a stored procedure which encapsulates our common filtering parameters (startdate, enddate, pagenumber, pagesize, list of int's, etc). The reason for this is to reduce the amount of similar parameters and boilerplate SQL spread around our procedures. This would give us a more standard interface and starting point for each procedure right from the start. I haven't been able to find much info on the topic.

Pattern I've noticed - when first building most SP's they start with a single id parameter used in the where clause. At some point later, you may need to add parameters for date range parameters (startdate, enddate or dynamic ranges "ytd, mtd, dtd"). If the data set is large enough you also may need to introduce pagesize/pagenum for server side paging. After some time you may realize that you need results for a list of id's rather than a single id, so you add a CSV or XML parameter to envelope the IDs.

Ultimately many stored procedures end up with a lot of similar boilerplate and (hopefully) identical parameters for handling these standard filtering parameters. I'm trying to research known patterns for passing an encapsulated filter object parameter to my procedures, that ideally would be strongly typed on the C# side. This would be particularly useful when managing a group of procedures that power reports which all require the same filtering options (in addition to the report-specific query parameters).

My goal is to reduce the number of parameters required to the bare minimum needed for the WHERE clause, and create a standard mechanism for passing the generic filtering options into a procedure and using those values while inside a procedure. How could this be achieved through XML or CLR or UDT parameters?

For context of this question, I'm using SQL Server 2008 via ADO.Net from C# 2.0. Unfortunately LINQ/EF is not an option for this project at this point, and we must stick with our existing RDBMS. If there is a known pattern that requires changing technologies I would be interested in hearing about it.

Edit: Appreciate the replies so far. I've added a bounty for 50pts that I'll let run for a few more days to try to promote some more discussion. If my question isn't clear enough just leave a comment..

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A potential solution I've considered is an xml-serialized C# object which is deserialized with a UDF into a datatable. There's still the hassle of fishing the appropriate values out by key name inside each procedure. In the end I'm just wanting to do some more research on this concept - is it available on other platforms? Is there a filtering layer/api that someone has developed to make this easier with SQL Server? Thanks in advance. –  mellodev May 9 '12 at 20:53
    
I use a lot of dynamic SQL. In this case, the problem is solved by passing in the WHERE clause. –  Gordon Linoff May 9 '12 at 21:43
    
Thanks for your input. We already do a lot of dynamic sql, actually all our SQL for this project stored in the app, where we attach SqlDataParameters and do our own proprietary WHERE clause injections as needed. However each of the blocks of SQL end up with a lot of duplicate parameters and logic for the usual filtering needs, I am trying to find a pattern that encapsulates these into a single parameter. –  mellodev May 9 '12 at 21:58
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

I personally think that you're overthinking or trying to reduce something that doesn't need to be reduced. You're probably better off leaving stored procedure parameters alone, or trying to create some base classes and helper functions that can append sets of parameters to a command object.

However, that being said, I'll throw a solution to your question out there and see if it fits your needs:

I suggest using TSQL user defined types. Create one or more types. Maybe one for date ranges, and one for paging and sorting. I use a similar process for passing multi-row data to stored procedures. (Some of this code might need to be tweaked a bit, as I'm just modifying some code I've already written and I haven't worked with DataTable fields in quite some time.)

Ultimately, all this does is shorten the list of parameters in the application method and matching stored procedure. The stored procedure would be responsible for extracting or joining the information in the table variable. The classes listed below do provide the ability to keep these parameters strongly typed on the .NET application side.

if not exists (select * from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.DOMAINS where DOMAIN_SCHEMA = 'dbo' and DOMAIN_NAME = 'DateRange' and DATA_TYPE = 'table type')
begin

    create type dbo.DateRange as table 
    (
        StartDate datetime2 null
        ,EndDate datetime2 null
    )

end
go


if not exists (select * from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.DOMAINS where DOMAIN_SCHEMA = 'dbo' and DOMAIN_NAME = 'Paging' and DATA_TYPE = 'table type')
begin

    create type dbo.Paging as table 
    (
        PageNumber int null
        ,PageSize int null
        ,SortField sysname null
        ,SortDirection varchar(4) null
    )

end
go

The SQL user defined types can be represented as strongly typed objects in a .NET application. Start with a base class:

    Imports System
    Imports System.Data
    Imports System.Data.SqlClient
    Imports System.Runtime.Serialization


    Namespace SqlTypes

        <Serializable()> _
        <System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategory("Code")> _
        Public MustInherit Class SqlTableTypeBase
            Inherits DataTable

            Public Sub New()

                MyBase.New()
                Initialize()

            End Sub


            Public Sub New(ByVal tableName As String)

                MyBase.New(tableName)
                Initialize()

            End Sub


            Public Sub New(ByVal tableName As String, ByVal tableNamespace As String)

                MyBase.New(tableName, tableNamespace)
                Initialize()

            End Sub


            Protected Sub New(ByVal info As SerializationInfo, ByVal context As StreamingContext)

                MyBase.New(info, context)

            End Sub


            ''' <summary>
            ''' Implement this method to create the columns in the data table to match the SQL server user defined table type
            ''' </summary>
            ''' <remarks></remarks>
            Protected MustOverride Sub Initialize()


            Public Function CreateParameter(parameterName As String) As SqlParameter

                Dim p As New SqlParameter(parameterName, SqlDbType.Structured)
                p.Value = Me

                Return p

            End Function

        End Class

    End Namespace

Create an implementation for the SQL types:

Imports System
Imports System.Data
Imports System.Runtime.Serialization


Namespace SqlTypes

    <Serializable()> _
    <System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategory("Code")> _
    Public Class DateRange
        Inherits SqlTableTypeBase

        Public Sub New()

            MyBase.New()

        End Sub


        Public Sub New(ByVal tableName As String)

            MyBase.New(tableName)

        End Sub


        Public Sub New(ByVal tableName As String, ByVal tableNamespace As String)

            MyBase.New(tableName, tableNamespace)

        End Sub


        Protected Sub New(ByVal info As SerializationInfo, ByVal context As StreamingContext)

            MyBase.New(info, context)

        End Sub


        'TODO: throw some more overloaded constructors in here...

        Public Sub New(startDate As DateTime?, endDate As DateTime?)

            MyBase.New()

            Me.StartDate = startDate
            Me.EndDate = endDate

        End Sub


        Public Property StartDate As DateTime?
            Get
                Return CType(Me.Rows(0)(0), DateTime?)
            End Get
            Set(value As DateTime?)
                Me.Rows(0)(0) = value
            End Set
        End Property


        Public Property EndDate As DateTime?
            Get
                Return CType(Me.Rows(0)(1), DateTime?)
            End Get
            Set(value As DateTime?)
                Me.Rows(0)(1) = value
            End Set
        End Property


        Protected Overrides Sub Initialize()

            Me.Columns.Add(New DataColumn("StartDate", GetType(DateTime?)))
            Me.Columns.Add(New DataColumn("EndDate", GetType(DateTime?)))

            Me.Rows.Add({Nothing, Nothing})

        End Sub

    End Class

End Namespace

And:

Imports System
Imports System.Data
Imports System.Runtime.Serialization


Namespace SqlTypes

    <Serializable()> _
    <System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategory("Code")> _
    Public Class Paging
        Inherits SqlTableTypeBase

        Public Sub New()

            MyBase.New()

        End Sub


        Public Sub New(ByVal tableName As String)

            MyBase.New(tableName)

        End Sub


        Public Sub New(ByVal tableName As String, ByVal tableNamespace As String)

            MyBase.New(tableName, tableNamespace)

        End Sub


        Protected Sub New(ByVal info As SerializationInfo, ByVal context As StreamingContext)

            MyBase.New(info, context)

        End Sub


        'TODO: throw some more overloaded constructors in here...


        Public Sub New(pageNumber As Integer?, pageSize As Integer?)

            MyBase.New()

            Me.PageNumber = pageNumber
            Me.PageSize = pageSize

        End Sub


        Public Sub New(sortField As String, sortDirection As String)

            MyBase.New()

            Me.SortField = sortField
            Me.SortDirection = sortDirection

        End Sub


        Public Sub New(pageNumber As Integer?, pageSize As Integer?, sortField As String, sortDirection As String)

            Me.New(pageNumber, pageSize)

            Me.SortField = sortField
            Me.SortDirection = sortDirection

        End Sub


        Public Property PageNumber As Integer?
            Get
                Return CType(Me.Rows(0)(0), Integer?)
            End Get
            Set(value As Integer?)
                Me.Rows(0)(0) = value
            End Set
        End Property


        Public Property PageSize As Integer?
            Get
                Return CType(Me.Rows(0)(1), Integer?)
            End Get
            Set(value As Integer?)
                Me.Rows(0)(1) = value
            End Set
        End Property


        Public Property SortField As String
            Get
                Return CType(Me.Rows(0)(2), String)
            End Get
            Set(value As String)
                Me.Rows(0)(2) = value
            End Set
        End Property


        Public Property SortDirection As String
            Get
                Return CType(Me.Rows(0)(3), String)
            End Get
            Set(value As String)
                Me.Rows(0)(3) = value
            End Set
        End Property


        Protected Overrides Sub Initialize()

            Me.Columns.Add(New DataColumn("PageNumber", GetType(Integer?)))
            Me.Columns.Add(New DataColumn("PageSize", GetType(Integer?)))
            Me.Columns.Add(New DataColumn("SortField", GetType(String)))
            Me.Columns.Add(New DataColumn("SortDirection", GetType(String)))

            Me.Rows.Add({Nothing, Nothing, Nothing, Nothing})

        End Sub

    End Class

End Namespace

Instantiate the objects and set the values in the constructor, then simply get the parameter from the object, and append it to the stored procedure command object's parameter collection.

cmd.Parameters.Add(New DateRange(startDate, endDate).CreateParameter("DateRangeParams"))
cmd.Parameters.Add(New Paging(pageNumber, pageSize).CreateParameter("PagingParams"))

EDIT Since this answer revolves around the strong typing, I thought I should add an example of strong typing in the method signature:

'method signature with UDTs
Public Function GetMyReport(customParam1 as Integer, timeFrame as DateRange, pages as Paging) as IDataReader

'method signature without UDTs
Public Function GetMyReport(customParam1 as Integer, startDate as DateTime, endDate as DateTime, pageNumber as Integer, pageSize as Integer)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for taking the time to comment and give code examples. While a lot of the answers revolve around UDT, yours stands out because of the SQL and C# examples. –  mellodev May 21 '12 at 22:40
    
I agree that , the interface should be what it is if we do need those parameters. –  zinking May 23 '12 at 10:30
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We also faced this problem. Solved by creating a user defined table type on the Programmability/Type section on the database.

user defined table types SQL Server 2008 R2

This table is used across all the appl when calling different stored procedures and functions. We fill in this table programmatically on the appl client side (vb.net 2010) and then pass it as parameter. On the stored procedure we just read the table and do what ever we need to do, filtering, processing, etc. Hope this helps.

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Thanks for answering. I had considered something similar, creating a udt which is passed as a parameter. How did you implement the "just read the table and do what ever we need to" pattern inside each SP? I'm assuming the udt would essentially become a key/value store and I'd still end up with a lot of boilerplate inside each SP –  mellodev May 17 '12 at 18:28
    
Sorry that comment submitted before I finished my thought.. What did your UDT table structure look like? Did you build any UDFs to extract the values and reduce boilerplate? In hindsight and with your experience would you use this pattern in the future? –  mellodev May 17 '12 at 18:35
    
@mello702 you're welcome. First of all, I try to avoid whenever I can using any extra processes inside TSQL, I mean, no UDF, no dynamic parameters, etc. There are situations where is the only solution but I believe is not this one. When I say just read the table is nothing more than exactly that, do a plain SELECT from the table passed as parameter. Needless to say that this SELECT can be as complex as I want, maybe use even CTE, merge operation, calling another SP or function or whatever else I may need to accomplish my goal. –  Yaroslav May 18 '12 at 6:47
    
Thanks. I too avoid UDT, UDF, Triggers, etc except for very specific situations. –  mellodev May 18 '12 at 21:59
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In my opinion there is no really beautiful solution for this problem. The biggest problem is that most often some of the parameters can be null, but some not (don't care if parameters comes from table valued parameter or XML parameter). Then it ends up with SQL similar to this:

Declare @Col1Value int = null
Declare @Col2Value int = null
Select * 
From dbo.MyTable
where (@Col1Value is Null Or Col1 = @Col1Value)
    And (@Col2Value is Null Or Col2 = @Col2Value)

Of course, its not efficient + query plan is by far not the best..

To solve the problem dynamic SQL could help a lot. In that case though should consider user rights very carefully (may use Execute As someProxyUser, Certificates).

It could be possible then to make procedures with one input XML parameter, where you pass all parameters you need and then generate SQL.. But still- it not very nice way to do things, because when SQL becomes more complicated there is lots of coding involved.. For example, if you select data from multiple tables and there is the same column in more than one of them..

To summarize i don't think there is nice and elegant solutions for this problem.. Use entity framework and classical way of passing parameters :).

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Thanks for taking the time to respond. To be clear I wasn't hoping to pass a single parameter to all my procedures that would represent the entire Where clause. As a simple example, I want to encapsulate only the common paging and date filtering values needed (PageSize, PageNum, startdate, enddate). Almost all our queries used for reporting require these same parameters, and all contain the type of boilerplate you mention. Along the lines of declare @pagenum int;set @pagenum=isnull(@pagenumparam,1); ... Where 1=1 And cte.PageNum = @pagenum;. I agree there isn't a nice solution :) –  mellodev May 18 '12 at 22:09
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I would use XML as a parameter and add some UDF's to help unpacking the the parts of the XML you are interested in. Scalar valued UDF's for single value parameters and Table valued UDF's for lists.

Embedding XML in the query has a tendency to confuse the query optimizer and using UDF's can be a performance killer if it ends up in a where clause or a join so I would not use the XML or the UDF's in the query itself. I would first get the values from the XML to local variables, table variables or temp tables and then use those in the query.

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Thank you - you are correct about the concern of UDFs when used in joins or where clauses. For my implementation I would unpack the XML/filter parameter values into individual scoped vars before using them. One of my concerns is with the query plan caching or optimizer failing as a result, but I believe that may be avoided by unpacking into scoped vars before using in the where clause (similar to the problem/solution with DateTime parameter sniffing) –  mellodev May 18 '12 at 22:03
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I faced a similar situation and I found that UDT's worked pretty much perfectly. We started with a very similar problem : "get data for this account" and then it became "get data for these accounts", then "with these criteria" etc. We used UDT's instead of passing XML strings - once you get into an SP, you can join directly off of the UDT, and UDT's are supported by ADO.NET, so it's nice and simple. We were passing in hundreds of thousands of rows into our SP's from the UDT's (massive upserts) and performance did not become an issue with one exception: don't ever try to trace a query when you're sending that many rows in - the thread scheduler inside SQL server will explode.

One thing to be wary of when using user define table types: for some reason Microsoft thought it would be a good idea to prevent you from changing them, you can only drop / add them. Then someone else thought it would be even better to prevent you from dropping them if something depends on them, so you wind up with a very painful process to drop / reconsistute them if you change them if you do it by hand.

We didn't encapsulate all params into a single UDT only because our needs were more specific from procedure to procedure. So when we had lists of things, we used a UDT for that parameter, but I could easily see One UDT To Rule Them All being useful, with a few convenience functions to pull out well-known values like dates. I despise writing the same code multiple times, and this would definitely shrink your codebase at a minor cost to increased complexity. A side benefit would be forcing all developers to stick to a standard way of doing things, which is desireable not always enforced when crunch-time hits. You would also open up some nice opportunities within your data layer for code reuse.

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I like your answer - you identified the same pattern and came up with a similar solution. How did you address updating your UDTs? If I'm understanding you correctly they cannot be updated but rather must be dropped/recreated which is complicated by reference checking. When you say "by hand" do you mean via scripts vs using the UI? –  mellodev May 21 '12 at 22:43
    
Because UDTs can only be dropped/created, not altered, all dependent objects, e.g. stored procedures/functions that use a UDT, must also be dropped before the UDT can be dropped. There is no easy way to drop all objects that use a specific UDT. They need to be identified by hand. You can query the information schema to find parameters of a specific type, and then write a loop to drop those routines containing those parameters, but I wouldn't call that an "easy" solution. –  ulty4life May 21 '12 at 23:21
    
That's exactly what we did - it took a couple of hours to set it up, not too painful but not trivial. You can look up dependencies in the sys schema, then you write a loop that takes the dependent object definitions in sys.all_sql_modules, and writes the the definitions to a table. You then loop through, drop dependencies, drop/add for the UDT, then reconstitute the definitons for the dependent objects. I haven't done this and I make no assertions that it's true, but I've been told that some tools like dbProj will do it automatically. –  Triple Gilaman May 21 '12 at 23:32
    
select distinct r.ROUTINE_TYPE, r.ROUTINE_SCHEMA, r.ROUTINE_NAME from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.PARAMETERS p inner join INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES r on r.ROUTINE_NAME = p.SPECIFIC_NAME and r.ROUTINE_SCHEMA = p.SPECIFIC_SCHEMA where p.DATA_TYPE = 'table type' and p.USER_DEFINED_TYPE_NAME = 'MyUdtTypeName' –  ulty4life May 21 '12 at 23:33
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