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We purchase software, mainly, but then write integration and web services stuff on top of it(or "between them" might be more accurate). We need to take the great pile of vendor-supplied patches, DLL files, database scripts that collect over time and store those. We then need to deploy them to dev, then to test, then stanging, then production. Does anyone have a clever way to structure this type of data in TFS projects/folders? TFS might not be the best solution, but I'm afraid it has to be a given for this question.

Example: projects by environment? Branches by environment? Chronological folders by date? (given that versioning the files themselves like source code doesn't really make sense)

We would like to track when these files were deployed into which environment as part of the solution, and make it simple to go back and find, say, that x .dll was deployed as part of project y in staging on December 5. That sort of thing.

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1 Answer 1

I would say that the preferred solution is to have these external dependencies version controlled in their own directory parallel to your own development, and then reference to that directory. It will then be part of any branch, and you can have separate versions of those in development, test and production if needed. You will also be able to create specific branches for testing your solution against a patch from any of the vendors. Example:

$/Development-Branch
   |+3PP
   ||+Vendor-1
   |||+ Bin
   |||+ ...
   ||+Vendor-2
   | |+...
   |+Our-Project-1
   ||+ ...
   |+Our-Project-2
    |+ ...
$/Test-Branch (based on $Develeopment-Branch version XXX)
   |+3PP
    |+ ...

The downsides are that these external dependencies might take up a lot of space (if they're big), but that shouldn't be much of a problem nowadays, and that it might be tricky to check in patches/updates to them if the vendors themselves don't really support it. They might use different names on libraries etc between releases which can make version-controlling them the correct way a pain.

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