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I seem to be able to find people online who are trying to avoid this behaviour, but I can't seem to get the behaviour I want.

I have a list of Animals and I want to serialize them with different tags for each animal type (as opposed to the default beahviour with attaches attributes)

To get this behaviour, I'm using the following code

    [XmlElementAttribute(Order = 4)]
    [XmlElement("Frog", typeof(Frog))]
    [XmlElement("Cat", typeof(Cat))]
    [XmlElement("Dog", typeof(Dog))]
    public List<Animal> lines = new List<Animal>();

Which works great, except it flattens the list and I'd prefer it if the xml output was more like <animals> <Dog>Bob</Dog> <Cat>Fred</Cat> <Dog>Mike</Dog> </animals> with the <animals> tag preserved

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You should have separate classes for each animal type. –  Kendall Frey May 9 '12 at 21:39
    
How are you serializing it? –  JotaBe May 9 '12 at 23:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change the [XmlElementAttribute(Order = 4)] for [XmlArrayAttribute(Order=4)]

You can also specify an ElementName parameter in the attribute, which will be the root name, ie: [XmlArrayAttribute(Order=4, ElementName="animals")]

*Note: the Order=4 is sepecific to this case. You usually don't need it. *

EDIT: (thaks to OP comment):

You also have to change the attributes of the classes of the objects belongin to the list from [XmlElement] to [XmlArrayItem] (MSDN doc here), like so:

[XmlArrayItem("Frog", typeof(Frog))]
[XmlArrayItem("Cat", typeof(Cat))]
[XmlArrayItem("Dog", typeof(Dog))]
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This was exactly the solution I was looking for and probably wouldn't have found for a while, so thanks! For anyone else who comes to this solution though, it's worth adding that you'll also need to change the XmlElements to XmlArrayItems if you use XmlArrayAttribute. –  user1217210 May 10 '12 at 4:42
    
Thanks for your comment. I completely forgot that detail! –  JotaBe May 10 '12 at 9:52

You can always wrap the list in its own class, and you'll get the XML you expect:

public class StackOverflow_10524470
{
    public class Animal
    {
        [XmlText]
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
    public class Dog : Animal { }
    public class Cat : Animal { }
    public class Frog : Animal { }
    public class Root
    {
        [XmlElementAttribute(Order = 4, ElementName = "animals")]
        public Animals animals;
    }
    public class Animals
    {
        [XmlElementAttribute(Order = 4)]
        [XmlElement("Frog", typeof(Frog))]
        [XmlElement("Cat", typeof(Cat))]
        [XmlElement("Dog", typeof(Dog))]
        public List<Animal> lines = new List<Animal>();
    }
    public static void Test()
    {
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
        XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Root));
        Root root = new Root
        {
            animals = new Animals
            {
                lines = new List<Animal> 
                { 
                    new Dog { Name = "Fido" },
                    new Cat { Name = "Fluffy" },
                    new Frog { Name = "Singer" },
                }
            }
        };
        xs.Serialize(ms, root);
        Console.WriteLine(Encoding.UTF8.GetString(ms.ToArray()));
    }
}
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