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I am going through the pain of normalising a horrible legacy database, and have discovered what I think is a bug with the DBMS.

This query returns the results as I expect:

SELECT DISTINCT RIGHT(SQUEEZE(thing_id), 2) AS thing_id, TRIM(thing_name)
FROM thing
ORDER BY thing_id, thing_name;
(16 rows)

The first time I ran the query, I had inadvertently used the wrong columns in the ORDER BY, as below:

SELECT DISTINCT RIGHT(SQUEEZE(thing_id), 2) AS thing_id, TRIM(thing_name)
FROM thing
ORDER BY thing_name, location;
(33 rows)

Note that the only thing to change is the ORDER BY, and the number of rows returned increases from 16 to 33. The results it gives are not DISTINCT as the query specifies.

I believe this is an outright bug, but a coworker says that it is normal because when we order by "location", it is selected an included invisibly in the results.

Should the ORDER BY ever affect the number of rows returned in a SELECT query?

EDIT: I had another person look at the queries AND I copied the queries to two seperate files, then ran a diff command on them. It is 100% certain that the only difference between the two queries is the columns listed in the ORDER BY.

UPDATE: Ingres have since release patch 14301 with bugfix: "Bug 126640 (GENERIC) Query with order-by expression and distinct aggregate returns more rows than expected. The columns in the order-by expression are not in the select list."

i.e. The query in question will now result in an error as the results are not correct.

share|improve this question
    
Which db is it? – Irfan Mulic May 9 '12 at 22:28
4  
Tag says ingres – ilanco May 9 '12 at 22:28
    
Could you show the exact query? – shiplu.mokadd.im May 9 '12 at 22:38
    
@shiplu.mokadd.im The above are the exact queries. I just replaced the real business name with 'thing', and removed the returned data. – rusty_turkey May 9 '12 at 22:50
    
Check for database corruption. For example, if the two queries use two different indexes and one of them is corrupt, you will see this kind of behavior. – Nick Chammas May 10 '12 at 0:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since the order of operations in SQL is:

FROM > WHERE > GROUP BY > HAVING > SELECT > ORDER BY

this does seem to be a bug indeed. Which DBMS is it?

share|improve this answer
    
As the tag says, the DBMS is Ingres. – Tim Pote May 9 '12 at 22:28
1  
Thanks @Mario, I chose your answer because you also specified why the ORDER BY should not affect the result like this. – rusty_turkey May 9 '12 at 23:12
    
@rusty_turkey thanks. I'd also like to say that the only two clauses in which rows can ever be removed from the result are where and having, and maybe also select if you specify "distinct" or if the remaining columns have NULL rows. – MDeSchaepmeester May 10 '12 at 7:51
1  
@mario group by affects the number of rows and the from clause can remove rows eg on(1=2). – user533832 May 10 '12 at 9:53
1  
for most RDBMS you can add > WINDOWING FUNCTIONS to the end of the list – user533832 May 10 '12 at 9:54

The issue I see is that the second query has a column (location) in the ORDER BY that is not included in the SELECT DISTINCT list. Actually both of the queries are invalid SQL (despite that Ingres seems to allow them). I simplified them (so the first is ok) to:

Query one (valid SQL):

SELECT DISTINCT 
      thing_id 
    , thing_name
FROM thing
ORDER BY thing_id
       , thing_name ;

Query two (invalid SQL, should produce error):

SELECT DISTINCT 
      thing_id 
    , thing_name
FROM thing
ORDER BY thing_name
       , location;

Why should it give error? Because the ORDER BY should be processed after SELECTand DISTINCT. So, two or more rows in the original table may have same thing_id and thing_name but different location. These rows will be collapsed into one. So, there is no location value to be useed for the ordering. Even if there was (a hidden location valiue) kept, which one of the many should it be?

SELECT DISTINCT queries can be rewritten with SELECT ALL and GROUP BY (also invalid in this case):

SELECT ALL
      thing_id 
    , thing_name
FROM thing
GROUP BY thing_id 
       , thing_name
ORDER BY thing_name
       , location;

The above (query 2) actually does produce error in PostgreSQL, SQL-Server and Oracle. Test it in SQL-Fiddle


From the erroneous number of rows returned by the second query in Ingres, I guess that what happens behind the scenes is that he location is secretly kept in the SELECT list so it can be used for the ORDER BY and then removed. This, in combination with the DISTINCT results in the non-standard buggy behaviour:

SELECT DISTINCT 
      thing_id 
    , thing_name
   (, location         --- hidden column) 
FROM thing
ORDER BY thing_name
       , location;

You can call it either a bug or a feature, it doesn't matter, as long as you know it should really not be allowed in the first place.

It seems that a similar issue has been reported a year ago in Actian forum: Problem with DISTINCT + ORDER BY and supposedly fixed. No idea which version they are refering to or if it has been actually fixed or not (and what "fix" means).


If you want the query to be valid and behave as you expect, you could use somethign like this:

SELECT
      RIGHT(SQUEEZE(thing_id), 2)  AS squeezed_thing_id
    , TRIM(thing_name)             AS trimmed_thing_name 
    , MIN(location)                AS a_location            --- or MAX()
FROM 
    thing
GROUP BY 
      RIGHT(SQUEEZE(thing_id), 2)
    , TRIM(thing_name)     
ORDER BY 
      trimmed_thing_name
    , a_location ;                
share|improve this answer
1  
I did resort to opening a textbook, and it says that the ORDER BY can specify columns that do not appear in the result, but some dialects insist that the ORDER BY can only refer to columns that appear in the result. So in this case Ingres allow it and the DBMS servers you mentioned do not. – rusty_turkey May 9 '12 at 23:34
    
In a query without SELECT DISTINCT and without GROUP BY, yes I think almost all (if not all) DBMS allow any column to be in the ORDER BY. When there is grouping, it's greatly different. And SELECT DISTINCT is a form of grouping. – ypercubeᵀᴹ May 9 '12 at 23:38

No, order by should not affect the number of rows returned.

If what you're saying is true that would be a very strange and fundamental bug. I would triple (then quadruple) check the return columns on both queries to make absolutely sure that this isn't a simple user error before emailing the Ingres guys.

Edit

Actually, I would also try running the queries on a backup database. If you don't have a backup available, you might be able to get away with copying the database that you have (if Ingres supports that).

I've had queries returning nonsensical results on machines with faulty hardware before. That's definitely going to be something you want to check.

share|improve this answer
    
I billionuple checked the queries as I thought I was either crazy or new nothing about SQL. As per the edit of my original post, I also copied and pasted the queries to two files, then did a unix diff on them to confirm. – rusty_turkey May 9 '12 at 23:05
    
@rusty_turkey See my edit – Tim Pote May 9 '12 at 23:51

If you add location to the first query, then both will return the same number of rows. The reason why the second query returns more rows is because in that query you do not select location. As stated previously, some RDBMS do not allow it, Ingres does. Probably because the SQL standard does not forbid it ?.

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