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How do I convert between big-endian and little-endian values in C++?

EDIT: For clarity, I have to translate binary data (double-precision floating point values and 32-bit and 64-bit integers) from one CPU architecture to another. This doesn't involve networking, so ntoh() and similar functions won't work here.

EDIT #2: The answer I accepted applies directly to compilers I'm targetting (which is why I chose it). However, there are other very good, more portable answers here.

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Do you need to convert between big-endian and little-endian, or between one of these and your native format, for other processing? –  wnoise Sep 19 '08 at 20:27
11  
ntoh hton will work fine, even if it doesn't have anything to do with networking. –  Ben Collins Sep 20 '08 at 4:31
1  
The best way to deal with endianness in general is to make sure that the code runs on both little- and big-endian host machines. If that works, you probably did it right. Assuming you are on x86/be is dangerous as a practice. –  jakobengblom2 Oct 6 '08 at 20:19
6  
hton ntoh will not work if the machine is big-endian, because the question asker explicitly wants to perform the conversion. –  fabspro Nov 17 '11 at 8:38
1  
@jakobengblom2 is the only person to mention this. Almost all of the examples on this page use concepts like "swap" bytes instead of doing it agnostic of the underlying endianness. If you are dealing with external file formats (which have well defined endianness) then the most portable thing to do is treat the external data as a byte stream, and convert the byte stream to and from the native integers. I cringe everytime I see short swap(short x) code, since it will break if you move to a platform with different endianness. Matthieu M has the only right answer below. –  Mark Lakata Mar 8 '13 at 18:16

22 Answers 22

up vote 87 down vote accepted

If you're using Visual C++ do the following: You include intrin.h and call the following functions:

For 16 bit numbers:

unsigned short _byteswap_ushort(unsigned short value);

For 32 bit numbers:

unsigned long _byteswap_ulong(unsigned long value);

For 64 bit numbers:

unsigned __int64 _byteswap_uint64(unsigned __int64 value);

8 bit numbers (chars) don't need to be converted.

Also these are only defined for unsigned values they work for signed integers as well.

For floats and doubles it's more difficult as with plain integers as these may or not may be in the host machines byte-order. You can get little-endian floats on big-endian machines and vice versa.

Other compilers have similar intrinsics as well.

In GCC for example you can directly call:

int32_t __builtin_bswap32 (int32_t x)
int64_t __builtin_bswap64 (int64_t x)

(no need to include something). Afaik bits.h declares the same function in a non gcc-centric way as well.

16 bit swap it's just a bit-rotate.

Calling the intrinsics instead of rolling your own gives you the best performance and code density btw..

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Do you know if the gcc intrinsics are available on otehr platforms as well? i.e., are they tied to x86 host or would they work on PPC, SPARC, etc? –  jakobengblom2 Oct 6 '08 at 20:20
    
They should work on all gcc supported platforms. If the target CPU does not support the byteswap as a single instruction the compiler will either inline optimized code or call a runtime function. –  Nils Pipenbrinck Oct 7 '08 at 7:08
8  
With GCC, I might use: #include <byteswap.h> int32_t bswap_32(int32_t x) int64_t bswap_64(int64_t x) –  jmanning2k Nov 14 '08 at 16:16
3  
__builtin_bswapX is only available from GCC-4.3 onwards –  Matt Joiner Dec 17 '09 at 4:18
8  
It's also worth noting that these intrinsics /always/ swap bytes, they aren't like htonl, htons, etc. You have to know from the context of your situation when to actually swap the bytes. –  Brian Vandenberg Apr 25 '12 at 16:04

If you are doing this for purposes of network/host compatability you should use:

ntohl() //Network to Host byte order (Long)
htonl() //Host to Network byte order (Long)

ntohs() //Network to Host byte order (Short)
htons() //Host to Network byte order (Short)

If you are doing this for some other reason one of the byte_swap solutions presented here would work just fine.

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1  
network byte ordering is big endian I believe. These functions can be used with that in mind even if you're not using network code. However there is no float versions ntohf or htonf –  Matt Nov 13 '10 at 20:33
    
Matt H. that is only mostly correct. Not all computer systems have little-endian byte order. If you were working on, say a motorolla 68k, a PowerPC, or another big-endian architecture these functions will not swap bytes at all because they are already in 'Network byte order. –  Frosty Nov 15 '10 at 14:36
    
Unfortunately, htonl and ntohl can't go to little endian on a big-endian platform. –  Brian Vandenberg Apr 25 '12 at 16:10
    
So then.. what @Matt said is exactly correct... –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Dec 7 '12 at 23:24
    
@BrianVandenberg: That's not what they are made for. They are made for giving a consistent external format. I'd say unless you're actually implementing those functions, you normally shouldn't even care about what that format actually is. –  celtschk Jul 21 '13 at 19:48

Simply put:

template <typename T>
T swap_endian(T u)
{
    union
    {
        T u;
        unsigned char u8[sizeof(T)];
    } source, dest;

    source.u = u;

    for (size_t k = 0; k < sizeof(T); k++)
        dest.u8[k] = source.u8[sizeof(T) - k - 1];

    return dest.u;
}

usage: swap_endian<uint32_t>(42).

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1  
Why the downvote ? –  Alexandre C. Feb 10 '11 at 23:55
    
Have an upvote. I just used uchars, and assigned 4 to 1, 3 to 2, 2 to 3, and 1 to 4, but this is more flexible if you have different sizes. 6 clocks on a 1st Gen Pentium IIRC. BSWAP is 1 clock, but is platform specific. –  RocketRoy Mar 1 '13 at 19:53
1  
@RocketRoy: Yes, and if speed turns out to be an issue, it it very simple to write overloads with platform- and type-specific intrisics. –  Alexandre C. Jul 14 '13 at 11:23
1  
@MihaiTodor: This use of unions for typecasting through an array of chars is explicitly allowed by the standard. See eg. this question. –  Alexandre C. May 4 at 12:36
1  
@Rapptz: 3.10 seems clear: "If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined: [...] a char or unsigned char type.". Maybe I'm missing something here, but it was pretty clear to me that accessing any type through char pointers was explicitly allowed. –  Alexandre C. Jul 23 at 18:20

From The Byte Order Fallacy by Rob Pyke:

Let's say your data stream has a little-endian-encoded 32-bit integer. Here's how to extract it (assuming unsigned bytes):

i = (data[0]<<0) | (data[1]<<8) | (data[2]<<16) | (data[3]<<24);

If it's big-endian, here's how to extract it:

i = (data[3]<<0) | (data[2]<<8) | (data[1]<<16) | (data[0]<<24);

TL;DR: don't worry about your platform native order, all that counts is the byte order of the stream your are reading from, and you better hope it's well defined.

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1  
This is cool, but it seems to me that it only applies to integers and the variants. What to do with floats/doubles? –  Brett Jan 5 '13 at 5:04
    
@Brett: strictly no idea :) –  Matthieu M. Jan 5 '13 at 13:08
    
this is true only because your i variable was created by the compiler on the stack. When you use pointers that refers to mapped data (or file that you entirely pulled in memory) you need to care about host endianness as well, AND alignment which makes it dual difficult. –  v.oddou Nov 1 '13 at 6:05
    
@v.oddou: yes and no, memory mapped files are exactly the same than network frames; if you accept not to read them directly, all that matters is their endianness: if little-endian, use the first formula, if it's big-endian, use the second. Any compiler worth its salt will optimize-out unneeded transformations if the endianness match. –  Matthieu M. Nov 1 '13 at 11:10
    
will this work if i is signed? –  meowsqueak Feb 12 at 0:25

I took a few suggestions from this post and put them together to form this:

#include <boost/type_traits.hpp>
#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>
#include <boost/detail/endian.hpp>
#include <stdexcept>

enum endianness
{
    little_endian,
    big_endian,
    network_endian = big_endian,

    #if defined(BOOST_LITTLE_ENDIAN)
        host_endian = little_endian
    #elif defined(BOOST_BIG_ENDIAN)
        host_endian = big_endian
    #else
        #error "unable to determine system endianness"
    #endif
};

namespace detail {

template<typename T, size_t sz>
struct swap_bytes
{
    inline T operator()(T val)
    {
        throw std::out_of_range("data size");
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct swap_bytes<T, 1>
{
    inline T operator()(T val)
    {
        return val;
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct swap_bytes<T, 2>
{
    inline T operator()(T val)
    {
        return ((((val) >> 8) & 0xff) | (((val) & 0xff) << 8));
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct swap_bytes<T, 4>
{
    inline T operator()(T val)
    {
        return ((((val) & 0xff000000) >> 24) |
                (((val) & 0x00ff0000) >>  8) |
                (((val) & 0x0000ff00) <<  8) |
                (((val) & 0x000000ff) << 24));
    }
};

template<>
struct swap_bytes<float, 4>
{
    inline float operator()(float val)
    {
        uint32_t mem =swap_bytes<uint32_t, sizeof(uint32_t)>()(*(uint32_t*)&val);
        return *(float*)&mem;
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct swap_bytes<T, 8>
{
    inline T operator()(T val)
    {
        return ((((val) & 0xff00000000000000ull) >> 56) |
                (((val) & 0x00ff000000000000ull) >> 40) |
                (((val) & 0x0000ff0000000000ull) >> 24) |
                (((val) & 0x000000ff00000000ull) >> 8 ) |
                (((val) & 0x00000000ff000000ull) << 8 ) |
                (((val) & 0x0000000000ff0000ull) << 24) |
                (((val) & 0x000000000000ff00ull) << 40) |
                (((val) & 0x00000000000000ffull) << 56));
    }
};

template<>
struct swap_bytes<double, 8>
{
    inline double operator()(double val)
    {
        uint64_t mem =swap_bytes<uint64_t, sizeof(uint64_t)>()(*(uint64_t*)&val);
        return *(double*)&mem;
    }
};

template<endianness from, endianness to, class T>
struct do_byte_swap
{
    inline T operator()(T value)
    {
        return swap_bytes<T, sizeof(T)>()(value);
    }
};
// specialisations when attempting to swap to the same endianess
template<class T> struct do_byte_swap<little_endian, little_endian, T> { inline T operator()(T value) { return value; } };
template<class T> struct do_byte_swap<big_endian,    big_endian,    T> { inline T operator()(T value) { return value; } };

} // namespace detail

template<endianness from, endianness to, class T>
inline T byte_swap(T value)
{
    // ensure the data is only 1, 2, 4 or 8 bytes
    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(sizeof(T) == 1 || sizeof(T) == 2 || sizeof(T) == 4 || sizeof(T) == 8);
    // ensure we're only swapping arithmetic types
    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(boost::is_arithmetic<T>::value);

    return detail::do_byte_swap<from, to, T>()(value);
}
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We've done this with templates. You could so something like this:

// Specialization for 2-byte types.
template<>
inline void endian_byte_swapper< 2 >(char* dest, char const* src)
{
    // Use bit manipulations instead of accessing individual bytes from memory, much faster.
    ushort* p_dest = reinterpret_cast< ushort* >(dest);
    ushort const* const p_src = reinterpret_cast< ushort const* >(src);
    *p_dest = (*p_src >> 8) | (*p_src << 8);
}

// Specialization for 4-byte types.
template<>
inline void endian_byte_swapper< 4 >(char* dest, char const* src)
{
    // Use bit manipulations instead of accessing individual bytes from memory, much faster.
    uint* p_dest = reinterpret_cast< uint* >(dest);
    uint const* const p_src = reinterpret_cast< uint const* >(src);
    *p_dest = (*p_src >> 24) | ((*p_src & 0x00ff0000) >> 8) | ((*p_src & 0x0000ff00) << 8) | (*p_src << 24);
}
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There is an assembly instruction called BSWAP that will do the swap for you, extremely fast. You can read about it here.

Visual Studio, or more precisely the Visual C++ runtime library, has platform intrinsics for this, called _byteswap_ushort(), _byteswap_ulong(), and _byteswap_int64(). Similar should exist for other platforms, but I'm not aware of what they would be called.

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That's a great link. It's rekindled my interest in x86 assembler. –  PP. Nov 17 '09 at 15:53
    
Timing results for BSWAP are presented here. gmplib.org/~tege/x86-timing.pdf ... and here ... agner.org/optimize/instruction_tables.pdf –  RocketRoy Mar 1 '13 at 20:48

The procedure for going from big-endian to little-endian is the same as going from little-endian to big-endian.

Here's some example code:

void swapByteOrder(unsigned short& us)
{
    us = (us >> 8) |
         (us << 8);
}

void swapByteOrder(unsigned int& ui)
{
    ui = (ui >> 24) |
         ((ui<<8) & 0x00FF0000) |
         ((ui>>8) & 0x0000FF00) |
         (ui << 24);
}

void swapByteOrder(unsigned long long& ull)
{
    ull = (ull >> 56) |
          ((ull<<40) & 0x00FF000000000000) |
          ((ull<<24) & 0x0000FF0000000000) |
          ((ull<<8) & 0x000000FF00000000) |
          ((ull>>8) & 0x00000000FF000000) |
          ((ull>>24) & 0x0000000000FF0000) |
          ((ull>>40) & 0x000000000000FF00) |
          (ull << 56);
}
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1  
The last function posted here is incorrect, and should be edited to: void swapByteOrder(unsigned long long& ull) { ull = (ull >> 56) | ... (ull << 56); } –  Eric Burnett Sep 19 '08 at 20:58
    
Thanks for catching that! –  Kevin Sep 19 '08 at 21:00
11  
I don't think it's correct to be using logical-and (&&) as opposed to bitwise-and (&). According to the C++ spec, both operands are implicitly converted to bool, which is not what you want. –  Trevor Robinson Jun 23 '09 at 21:04

If you're doing this to transfer data between different platforms look at the ntoh and hton functions.

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The same way you do in C:

short big = 0xdead;
short little = (((big & 0xff)<<8) | ((big & 0xff00)>>8));

You could also declare a vector of unsigned chars, memcpy the input value into it, reverse the bytes into another vector and memcpy the bytes out, but that'll take orders of magnitude longer than bit-twiddling, especially with 64-bit values.

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On most POSIX systems (through it's not in the POSIX standard) there is the endian.h, which can be used to determine what encoding your system uses. From there it's something like this:

unsigned int change_endian(unsinged int x)
{
    unsigned char *ptr = (unsigned char *)&x;
    return (ptr[0] << 24) | (ptr[1] << 16) | (ptr[2] << 8) | ptr[3];
}

This swaps the order (from big-endian to little endian):

If you have the number 0xDEADBEEF (on a little endian system stored as 0xEFBEADDE), ptr[0] will be 0xEF, ptr[1] is 0xBE, etc.

But if you want to use it for networking, then htons, htonl and htonll (and their inverse ntohs, ntohl and ntohll) will be helpfull to converting from host order to network order.

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4  
That's funny - the POSIX standard at opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/toc.htm does not mention a header '<endian.h>`. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 '10 at 23:36
    
That's true. I'll fix it. –  terminus Jan 1 '12 at 17:29

I have this code that allow me to convert from HOST_ENDIAN_ORDER (whatever it is) to LITTLE_ENDIAN_ORDER or BIG_ENDIAN_ORDER. I use a template, so if I try to convert from HOST_ENDIAN_ORDER to LITTLE_ENDIAN_ORDER and they happen to be the same for the machine for wich I compile, no code will be generated.

Here is the code with some comments:

// We define some constant for little, big and host endianess. Here I use 
// BOOST_LITTLE_ENDIAN/BOOST_BIG_ENDIAN to check the host indianess. If you
// don't want to use boost you will have to modify this part a bit.
enum EEndian
{
  LITTLE_ENDIAN_ORDER,
  BIG_ENDIAN_ORDER,
#if defined(BOOST_LITTLE_ENDIAN)
  HOST_ENDIAN_ORDER = LITTLE_ENDIAN_ORDER
#elif defined(BOOST_BIG_ENDIAN)
  HOST_ENDIAN_ORDER = BIG_ENDIAN_ORDER
#else
#error "Impossible de determiner l'indianness du systeme cible."
#endif
};

// this function swap the bytes of values given it's size as a template
// parameter (could sizeof be used?).
template <class T, unsigned int size>
inline T SwapBytes(T value)
{
  union
  {
     T value;
     char bytes[size];
  } in, out;

  in.value = value;

  for (unsigned int i = 0; i < size / 2; ++i)
  {
     out.bytes[i] = in.bytes[size - 1 - i];
     out.bytes[size - 1 - i] = in.bytes[i];
  }

  return out.value;
}

// Here is the function you will use. Again there is two compile-time assertion
// that use the boost librarie. You could probably comment them out, but if you
// do be cautious not to use this function for anything else than integers
// types. This function need to be calles like this :
//
//     int x = someValue;
//     int i = EndianSwapBytes<HOST_ENDIAN_ORDER, BIG_ENDIAN_ORDER>(x);
//
template<EEndian from, EEndian to, class T>
inline T EndianSwapBytes(T value)
{
  // A : La donnée à swapper à une taille de 2, 4 ou 8 octets
  BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(sizeof(T) == 2 || sizeof(T) == 4 || sizeof(T) == 8);

  // A : La donnée à swapper est d'un type arithmetic
  BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(boost::is_arithmetic<T>::value);

  // Si from et to sont du même type on ne swap pas.
  if (from == to)
     return value;

  return SwapBytes<T, sizeof(T)>(value);
}
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Most platforms have a system header file that provides efficient byteswap functions. On Linux it is in <endian.h>. You can wrap it nicely in C++:

#include <iostream>

#include <endian.h>

template<size_t N> struct SizeT {};

#define BYTESWAPS(bits) \
template<class T> inline T htobe(T t, SizeT<bits / 8>) { return htobe ## bits(t); } \
template<class T> inline T htole(T t, SizeT<bits / 8>) { return htole ## bits(t); } \
template<class T> inline T betoh(T t, SizeT<bits / 8>) { return be ## bits ## toh(t); } \
template<class T> inline T letoh(T t, SizeT<bits / 8>) { return le ## bits ## toh(t); }

BYTESWAPS(16)
BYTESWAPS(32)
BYTESWAPS(64)

#undef BYTESWAPS

template<class T> inline T htobe(T t) { return htobe(t, SizeT<sizeof t>()); }
template<class T> inline T htole(T t) { return htole(t, SizeT<sizeof t>()); }
template<class T> inline T betoh(T t) { return betoh(t, SizeT<sizeof t>()); }
template<class T> inline T letoh(T t) { return letoh(t, SizeT<sizeof t>()); }

int main()
{
    std::cout << std::hex;
    std::cout << htobe(static_cast<unsigned short>(0xfeca)) << '\n';
    std::cout << htobe(0xafbeadde) << '\n';

    // Use ULL suffix to specify integer constant as unsigned long long 
    std::cout << htobe(0xfecaefbeafdeedfeULL) << '\n';
}

Output:

cafe
deadbeaf
feeddeafbeefcafe
share|improve this answer
    
Change:#define BYTESWAPS(bits) \ template<class T> inline T htobe(T t, SizeT<bits / 8>) { return htobe ## bits(t); } \ template<class T> inline T htole(T t, SizeT<bits / 8>) { return htole ## bits(t); } \ template<class T> inline T betoh(T t, SizeT<bits / 8>) { return be ## bits ## toh(t); } \ template<class T> inline T letoh(T t, SizeT<bits / 8>) { return le ## bits ## toh(t); } –  ldav1s Feb 22 '11 at 20:47
    
Thanks, forgot to test betoh() and letoh(). –  Maxim Yegorushkin Feb 23 '11 at 10:16

i like this one, just for style :-)

long swap(long i) {
    char *c = (char *) &i;
    return * (long *) (char[]) {c[3], c[2], c[1], c[0] };
}
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I get an error on char[] saying 'Error: incomplete type is not allowed' –  Portland Runner Oct 28 '13 at 1:11

Here's a generalized version I came up with off the top of my head, for swapping a value in place. The other suggestions would be better if performance is a problem.

 template<typename T>
    void ByteSwap(T * p)
    {
        for (int i = 0;  i < sizeof(T)/2;  ++i)
            std::swap(((char *)p)[i], ((char *)p)[sizeof(T)-1-i]);
    }

Disclaimer: I haven't tried to compile this or test it yet.

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Note that, at least for Windows, htonl() is much slower than their intrinsic counterpart _byteswap_ulong(). The former is a DLL library call into ws2_32.dll, the latter is one BSWAP assembly instruction. Therefore, if you are writing some platform-dependent code, prefer using the intrinsics for speed:

#define htonl(x) _byteswap_ulong(x)

This may be especially important for .PNG image processing where all integers are saved in Big Endian with explanation "One can use htonl()..." {to slow down typical Windows programs, if you are not prepared}.

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If you take the common pattern for reversing the order of bits in a word, and cull the part that reverses bits within each byte, then you're left with something which only reverses the bytes within a word. For 64-bits:

x = ((x & 0x00000000ffffffff) << 32) ^ ((x >> 32) & 0x00000000ffffffff);
x = ((x & 0x0000ffff0000ffff) << 16) ^ ((x >> 16) & 0x0000ffff0000ffff);
x = ((x & 0x00ff00ff00ff00ff) <<  8) ^ ((x >>  8) & 0x00ff00ff00ff00ff);

The compiler should clean out the superfluous bit-masking operations (I left them in to highlight the pattern), but if it doesn't you can rewrite the first line this way:

x = ( x                       << 32) ^  (x >> 32);

That should normally simplify down to a single rotate instruction on most architectures (ignoring that the whole operation is probably one instruction).

On a RISC processor the large, complicated constants may cause the compiler difficulties. You can trivially calculate each of the constants from the previous one, though. Like so:

uint64_t k = 0x00000000ffffffff; /* compiler should know a trick for this */
x = ((x & k) << 32) ^ ((x >> 32) & k);
k ^= k << 16;
x = ((x & k) << 16) ^ ((x >> 16) & k);
k ^= k << 8;
x = ((x & k) <<  8) ^ ((x >>  8) & k);

If you like, you can write that as a loop. It won't be efficient, but just for fun:

int i = sizeof(x) * CHAR_BIT / 2;
uintmax_t k = (1 << i) - 1;
while (i >= 8)
{
    x = ((x & k) << i) ^ ((x >> i) & k);
    i >>= 1;
    k ^= k << i;
}

And for completeness, here's the simplified 32-bit version of the first form:

x = ( x               << 16) ^  (x >> 16);
x = ((x & 0x00ff00ff) <<  8) ^ ((x >>  8) & 0x00ff00ff);
share|improve this answer

Look up bit shifting, as this is basically all you need to do to swap from little -> big endian. Then depending on the bit size, you change how you do the bit shifting.

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In another post I have answered to a similar question about swap bytes of an integer. Please see it here
Logic of this job is simple, we should swap byte 1 with byte 4 and byte 2 with byte 3

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Seriously... I don't understand why all solutions are that complicated! How about the simplest, most general template function that swaps any type of any size under any circumstances in any operating system????

template <typename T>
void SwapEnd(T& var)
{
    T varSwapped;
    for(long i = 0; i < static_cast<long>(sizeof(var)); i++)
        ((char*)(&varSwapped))[sizeof(var) - 1 - i] = ((char*)(&var))[i];
    for(long i = 0; i < static_cast<long>(sizeof(var)); i++)
        ((char*)(&var))[i] = ((char*)(&varSwapped))[i];
}

It's the magic power of C and C++ together! Simply swap the original variable character by character, and then copy the swapped variabled over the older one, character by character!

Remember that I didn't use simple assignment operator "=" because some objects will be messed up when the endianness is flipped and the copy constructor (or assignment operator) won't work. Therefore, it's more reliable to copy them char by char.

To call it, just use

double x = 5;
SwapEnd(x);

and now x is different in endianness.

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If a big-endian 32-bit unsigned integer looks like 0xAABBCCDD which is equal to 2864434397, then that same 32-bit unsigned integer looks like 0xDDCCBBAA on a little-endian processor which is also equal to 2864434397.

If a big-endian 16-bit unsigned short looks like 0xAABB which is equal to 43707, then that same 16-bit unsigned short looks like 0xBBAA on a little-endian processor which is also equal to 43707.

Here are a couple of handy #define functions to swap bytes from little-endian to big-endian and vice-versa -->

// can be used for short, unsigned short, word, unsigned word (2-byte types)
#define BYTESWAP16(n) (((n&0xFF00)>>8)|((n&0x00FF)<<8))

// can be used for int or unsigned int or float (4-byte types)
#define BYTESWAP32(n) ((BYTESWAP16((n&0xFFFF0000)>>16))|((BYTESWAP16(n&0x0000FFFF))<<16))

// can be used for unsigned long long or double (8-byte types)
#define BYTESWAP64(n) ((BYTESWAP32((n&0xFFFFFFFF00000000)>>32))|((BYTESWAP32(n&0x00000000FFFFFFFF))<<32))
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A possible optimization would be to use a lookup table for the 16bit swapping.

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14  
aehm no. 16 bit swapping is a single cycle instruction on most architectures. A table will not only cost you memory but you risk a cache miss as well. On todays machines a cache miss can easily take 200 cycles or more. –  Nils Pipenbrinck Sep 19 '08 at 20:40
4  
Amen. There is no language where this would be an optimization. –  anon6439 Sep 19 '08 at 20:44
1  
16 bit byte ordering is the most trivial. A lookup table is definitely not needed. –  Matt Joiner Aug 19 '10 at 21:13
1  
LUT tables only make sense if the operation is expensive. Things like swapping values (or 32-bit arithmetic) are better just done using registers directly, rather than dealing with memory -- which is SLOW or SLOWER or really SLOW. –  Mark Lakata Mar 8 '13 at 18:12

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