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I am trying to establish an abstract class. I want to ensure that any subclass has an enum listing its potential actions.

For instance, Foo is an abstract class.

Fee extends Foo and can...
    TALK
    WALK
    SLEEP

Bar extends Foo and can...
    SIT
    STARE

I want to give the parent class the field and have the child classes fill in the enum with the actions that it is capable of. How would I approach this?

If I define an enum in a class, for instance, give it some generic actions, will it be passed to a subclass and could a subclass extend the enum? That could be another option.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't know that I agree with the approach but you could do

enum CanDos {
  TALK,
  WALK,
  SLEEP,
  SIT,
  STARE
}

And then the class could have

abstract class Foo {
  abstract Set<CanDos> getCanDos();
  //or
  abstract boolean can(CanDos item);
}

And you can use an EnumSet for efficient storage of the capabilities.

If all you are looking for is the Right Thing to provide a set of enums (like the field in the parent abstract class you mention) then I think EnumSet<CanDos> is your guy. In that case

abstract class Foo {

  private final Set<CanDos> candos;

  protected Foo(Set<CanDos> candos) 
  {
     this.candos = new EnumSet<CanDos>(candos);
  }

  public boolean can(CanDos item) {
    return candos.contains(item);
  }
}

Alternatively you could avoid the abstract class altogether (or at least not mandate it see e.g. this question or this one). The well-regarded book Effective Java suggests "Prefer interfaces to abstract classes".

To do this, instead

enum CanDos {
  TALK,
  WALK,
  SLEEP,
  SIT,
  STARE
}

public interface FooThatCanDo {
  boolean can(CanDos item);
}

If you really think there's value in a common inheritance root (which you should think hard about) then you could provide an abstract base implementation as shown above, and declare that it implements FooThatCanDo.

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I do think that I want an abstract class because I have a standard way to do each of these things (that is, a final method doStuff(CanDo doThis)). Does this sound like a good idea? –  gobernador May 9 '12 at 23:44
    
@gobernador: I'd go take a look at the guidance first. There are good reasons to use abstract classes, but more good reasons to avoid where possible. I suggest reading the Effective Java section on the topic my.safaribooksonline.com/book/programming/java/9780137150021/… or at the very least this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/56867/interface-vs-base-class, and ask whether the criteria apply to you. –  andersoj May 9 '12 at 23:46
    
@gobernador: You can also have the best of both worlds -- write an abstract class, and include it/subclass it by composition as a field in your subclasses rather than inheriting from it. This can be a good middle ground that lets you have the common code while not cementing inconvenient inheritance trees. If you write more about your specific problem above, might be able to offer more. –  andersoj May 9 '12 at 23:48
    
@gobernador: To clarify -- it's not abstract classes that are to be avoided; rather it's solving every problem via inheritance (a hammer that gets applied to too many non-nails). It is usually better to describe the abstraction through an interface (more flexible; allows multiple inheritance) and offer abstract classes where appropriate. –  andersoj May 9 '12 at 23:51
    
stackoverflow.com/a/56894/83695 –  andersoj May 9 '12 at 23:53

I don't think an enum is what you are looking for, at least not directly. Perhaps you could use a BitSet.

class Base {
    private static EnumSet actions;

    public EnumSet getActions() { return actions; }
}

class Derived extends Base {
    private static EnumSet actions;

    @Override
    public EnumSet getActions() { 
        return new EnumSet(actions).addAll(super.getActions()); 
    }
}
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There is no such thing as an abstract enum (that can have different implementations in subclasses) - but generics may be an option:

class Base<T> where T : struct {
    private T value;
    public void Foo(T value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
}
class Parent1 : Base<Parent1.Enum1> {
    public enum Enum1 {A, B, C};
}
class Parent2 : Base<Parent2.Enum2> {
    public enum Enum2 { J, H, K };
}

The only problem is that this doesn't enforce that only enums are usable - you can do this at runtime, though - for example in a type initializer:

static Base() {
    if (!typeof(T).IsEnum) throw new InvalidOperationException(
         typeof(T).Name + " is not an enum");
}
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1  
Could you do Base<T extends Enum>? If I'm thinking through this right, it would eliminate the need for a check. Using the keyword enum automatically extends the class Enum. –  gobernador May 9 '12 at 23:32

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