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I have a set of tables that look like:

workflows = Table('workflows', Base.metadata,
                  Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
                 )

actions = Table('actions', Base.metadata,
                Column('name', String, primary_key=True),
                Column('workflow_id', Integer, ForeignKey(workflows.c.id), primary_key=True),
               )

action_dependencies = Table('action_dependencies', Base.metadata,
                            Column('workflow_id', Integer, ForeignKey(workflows.c.id), primary_key=True),
                            Column('parent_action', String, ForeignKey(actions.c.name), primary_key=True),
                            Column('child_action', String, ForeignKey(actions.c.name), primary_key=True),
                           )

My ORM classes look like:

class Workflow(Base):
    __table__ = workflows

    actions = relationship("Action", order_by="Action.name", backref="workflow")


class Action(Base):
    __table__ = actions

    children = relationship("Action",
                            secondary=action_dependencies,
                            primaryjoin=actions.c.name == action_dependencies.c.parent_action,
                            secondaryjoin=actions.c.name == action_dependencies.c.child_action,
                            backref="parents"
                           )

So in my system, each action is uniquely identified by a combination of a workflow id and its name. I'd like each action to have parents and children attribute that refers its parent and child actions. Each action can have multiple parents and children.

The problem occurs when I have a function such as :

def set_parents(session, workflow_id, action_name, parents):
    action = session.query(db.Action).filter(db.Action.workflow_id == workflow.id).filter(db.Action.name == action_name).one()

    for parent_name in parents:
        parent = session.query(db.Action).filter(db.Action.workflow_id == workflow.id).filter(db.Action.name == parent_name).one()
        action.parents.append(parent)

    session.commit()

I get an error like:

IntegrityError: (IntegrityError) action_dependencies.workflow_id may not be NULL u'INSERT INTO action_dependencies (parent_action, child_action) VALUES (?, ?)' (u'directory_creator', u'packing')

How do I get the relationship to set the workflow_id correctly?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to have workflow_id in the action_dependencies table? –  van May 10 '12 at 9:06
    
Because the primary key for an action is a composite of its name and workflow_id. If the workflow_id was not in action_dependencies, there'd be no way to tell which workflow's actions the dependency was referring to. –  Kamil Kisiel May 10 '12 at 15:10
    
Good point, good point. let me think... –  van May 10 '12 at 15:23
    
Please note that your parents/children relationships should also include the workflow_id in the primaryjoin and secondary conditions, or else you will get these for all worklows. –  van May 10 '12 at 15:33
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

See below working code. The key points are those I mentioned in the comments:

  • proper composite ForeignKeys
  • correct relationship configuration using the FKs

Code:

workflows = Table('workflows', Base.metadata,
                  Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
                 )

actions = Table('actions', Base.metadata,
                Column('workflow_id', Integer, ForeignKey(workflows.c.id), primary_key=True),
                Column('name', String, primary_key=True),
               )

action_dependencies = Table('action_dependencies', Base.metadata,
                            Column('workflow_id', Integer, ForeignKey(workflows.c.id), primary_key=True),
                            Column('parent_action', String, ForeignKey(actions.c.name), primary_key=True),
                            Column('child_action', String, ForeignKey(actions.c.name), primary_key=True),
                            ForeignKeyConstraint(['workflow_id', 'parent_action'], ['actions.workflow_id', 'actions.name']),
                            ForeignKeyConstraint(['workflow_id', 'child_action'], ['actions.workflow_id', 'actions.name']),
                           )
class Workflow(Base):
    __table__ = workflows
    actions = relationship("Action", order_by="Action.name", backref="workflow")

class Action(Base):
    __table__ = actions
    children = relationship("Action",
                            secondary=action_dependencies,
                            primaryjoin=and_(actions.c.name == action_dependencies.c.parent_action,
                                actions.c.workflow_id == action_dependencies.c.workflow_id),
                            secondaryjoin=and_(actions.c.name == action_dependencies.c.child_action,
                                actions.c.workflow_id == action_dependencies.c.workflow_id),
                            backref="parents"
                           )

# create db schema
Base.metadata.create_all(engine)

# create entities
w_1 = Workflow()
w_2 = Workflow()
a_11 = Action(name="ac-11", workflow=w_1)
a_12 = Action(name="ac-12", workflow=w_1)
a_21 = Action(name="ac-21", workflow=w_2)
a_22 = Action(name="ac-22", workflow=w_2)
session.add(w_1)
session.add(w_2)
a_22.parents.append(a_21)
session.commit()
session.expunge_all()
print '-'*80

# helper functions
def get_workflow(id):
    return session.query(Workflow).get(id)
def get_action(name):
    return session.query(Action).filter_by(name=name).one()

# test another OK
a_11 = get_action("ac-11")
a_12 = get_action("ac-12")
a_11.children.append(a_12)
session.commit()
session.expunge_all()
print '-'*80

# test KO (THIS SHOULD FAIL VIOLATING FK-constraint)
a_11 = get_action("ac-11")
a_22 = get_action("ac-22")
a_11.children.append(a_22)
session.commit()
session.expunge_all()
print '-'*80
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I think I get it now :) –  Kamil Kisiel May 11 '12 at 16:48
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I don't think it's correct to have the primary key a foreign key. How does that work?

But to make composite constraint, a key that is "unique together", use this in the table definition:

UniqueConstraint(u"name", u"workflow_id"),

But if you really want it to be the primary key also you can use this:

PrimaryKeyConstraint(*columns, **kw)

http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/core/schema.html#sqlalchemy.schema.PrimaryKeyConstraint

share|improve this answer
3  
there's nothing wrong with foreign key constraints on primary keys; this is a typical way to get a 'one-to-one' relationship, to map subclasses to the database, or to have attributes that can all be "null together" –  IfLoop May 11 '12 at 12:55
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