Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The output of /proc/net/dev on Linux looks like this:

Inter-|   Receive                                                |  Transmit
 face |bytes    packets errs drop fifo frame compressed multicast|bytes    packets errs drop fifo colls carrier compressed
    lo:18748525  129811    0    0    0     0          0         0 18748525  129811    0    0    0     0       0          0
  eth0:1699369069 226296437    0    0    0     0          0      3555 4118745424 194001149    0    0    0     0       0          0
  eth1:       0       0    0    0    0     0          0         0        0       0    0    0    0     0       0          0
  sit0:       0       0    0    0    0     0          0         0        0       0    0    0    0     0       0          0

How can I use Python to parse this output into key:value pairs for each interface? I have found this forum topic for achieving it using shell scripting and there is a Perl extension but I need to use Python.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

this is pretty formatted input and you can easily get columns and data list by splitting each line, and then create a dict of of it.

here is a simple script without regex

lines = open("/proc/net/dev", "r").readlines()

columnLine = lines[1]
_, receiveCols , transmitCols = columnLine.split("|")
receiveCols = map(lambda a:"recv_"+a, receiveCols.split())
transmitCols = map(lambda a:"trans_"+a, transmitCols.split())

cols = receiveCols+transmitCols

faces = {}
for line in lines[2:]:
    if line.find(":") < 0: continue
    face, data = line.split(":")
    faceData = dict(zip(cols, data.split()))
    faces[face] = faceData

import pprint
pprint.pprint(faces)

it outputs

{'    lo': {'recv_bytes': '7056295',
            'recv_compressed': '0',
            'recv_drop': '0',
            'recv_errs': '0',
            'recv_fifo': '0',
            'recv_frame': '0',
            'recv_multicast': '0',
            'recv_packets': '12148',
            'trans_bytes': '7056295',
            'trans_carrier': '0',
            'trans_colls': '0',
            'trans_compressed': '0',
            'trans_drop': '0',
            'trans_errs': '0',
            'trans_fifo': '0',
            'trans_packets': '12148'},
 '  eth0': {'recv_bytes': '34084530',
            'recv_compressed': '0',
            'recv_drop': '0',
            'recv_errs': '0',
            'recv_fifo': '0',
            'recv_frame': '0',
            'recv_multicast': '0',
            'recv_packets': '30599',
            'trans_bytes': '6170441',
            'trans_carrier': '0',
            'trans_colls': '0',
            'trans_compressed': '0',
            'trans_drop': '0',
            'trans_errs': '0',
            'trans_fifo': '0',
            'trans_packets': '32377'}}
share|improve this answer
    
you can further improved it by striping interface names and convert values to float or int –  Anurag Uniyal Jun 27 '09 at 11:11
    
For a second I thought that _ would work as in Haskell, but sadly it doesn't :( –  Armandas Jun 27 '09 at 11:24
    
_ just is a placeholder variable name, how does it work in haskell? –  Anurag Uniyal Jun 27 '09 at 11:26
    
It matches everything, so you can use it to get a tail of a list for example. The same functionality is implemented in Python3: python.org/dev/peps/pep-3132 –  Armandas Jun 27 '09 at 11:33
    
why if line.find(":") < 0: continue ? –  SamK Jan 10 at 15:30

Does this help?

dev = open("/proc/net/dev", "r").readlines()
header_line = dev[1]
header_names = header_line[header_line.index("|")+1:].replace("|", " ").split()

values={}
for line in dev[2:]:
    intf = line[:line.index(":")].strip()
    values[intf] = [int(value) for value in line[line.index(":")+1:].split()]

    print intf,values[intf]

Output:

lo [803814, 16319, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 803814, 16319, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
eth0 [123605646, 102196, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 9029534, 91901, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
wmaster0 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
eth1 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
vboxnet0 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
pan0 [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

You could, of course, use the header names in header_names to construct a dict of dicts.

share|improve this answer
#!/usr/bin/env python
from __future__ import with_statement
import re
import pprint


ifaces = {}


with open('/proc/net/dev') as fd:
    lines = map(lambda x: x.strip(), fd.readlines())


lines = lines[1:]


lines[0] = lines[0].replace('|', ':', 1)
lines[0] = lines[0].replace('|', ' ', 1)
lines[0] = lines[0].split(':')[1]


keys = re.split('\s+', lines[0])
keys = map(lambda x: 'rx' + x[1] if x[0] < 8 else 'tx' + x[1], enumerate(keys))


for line in lines[1:]:
    interface, values = line.split(':')
    values = re.split('\s+', values)

    if values[0] == '':
        values = values[1:]

    values = map(int, values)

    ifaces[interface] = dict(zip(keys, values))


pprint.pprint(ifaces)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.