Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a flock command on Mac OS X that manages file lock?

http://linux.die.net/man/1/flock

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

Perl one-liner:

perl -MFcntl=:flock -e '$|=1; $f=shift; print("starting\n"); open(FH,$f) || die($!); flock(FH,LOCK_EX); print("got lock\n"); system(join(" ",@ARGV)); print("unlocking\n"); flock(FH,LOCK_UN); ' /tmp/longrunning.sh /tmp/longrunning.sh

As a script:

#!/usr/bin/perl 
# emulate linux flock command line utility
#
use warnings;
use strict;
use Fcntl qw(:flock);
# line buffer
$|=1;

my $file = shift;
my $cmd = join(" ",@ARGV);

if(!$file || !$cmd) { 
   die("usage: $0 <file> <command> [ <command args>... ]\n");
}

print("atempting to lock file: $file\n"); 
open(FH,$file) || die($!); 
flock(FH,LOCK_EX) || die($!); 
print("got lock\n"); 
print("running command: $cmd\n"); 
system($cmd);
print("unlocking file: $file\n"); 
flock(FH,LOCK_UN); 
share|improve this answer
1  
@Yan In the future, you probably should not make code changes to someone else's answer. Feel free to submit your suggested edit as a comment and let the author make the call as to whether he or she wants to change their answer or not (9 times out of 10, if it's a mistake, they'll fix it). Feel free to edit answers for substantial changes for clarity or formatting, but do not change the answer itself. –  Rob Feb 4 '13 at 18:56
    
Note that this Perl emulation is very incomplete - it only supports the form flock FILE COMMANDS... and not the flock FD form (neither does it support any of the flock(1) options). –  Alex Dupuy Apr 7 at 9:21
add comment

I don't believe that the flock command exists on OS X, but it does exist on BSD which should make it reasonably easy to port to OS X.

The closest that is available is the shlock command (man page), but it isn't as robust or secure as flock.

Your best bet may be to look at porting either the Linux or BSD version of flock to OS X.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Are you looking for flock the command line utility or flock the feature?

flock(1) is unavailable on OS X. flock(2) (the C function for file locking), however is.

Writing a simple command line flock(1) utility using flock(2) should be trivial.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Just for completeness sake, you can compile flock(2) for OSX with some minor changes, i have not run any tests, but basic functionality works.

You can get the source from ftp://ftp.kernel.org//pub/linux/utils/util-linux. You then need to replace some calls to string functions not available on OSX, and you're good to go.

Here: https://gist.github.com/Ahti/4962822 is my modified flock.c of version 2.22.1, you still need the other sources for headers though.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Maybe lockfile could be used as well.

http://linux.die.net/man/1/lockfile

share|improve this answer
add comment

You cannot write a shell-level flock(1) command for use in shell programming because of how file locking working. The lock is on the descriptor, not on the inode or directory entry.

Therefore, if you implement a shell command that flocks something, as soon as the locking command exits and the shell script moves on to the next command, the descriptor that held the lock disappears and so there is no lock retained.

The only way to implement this would be as a shell builtin. Alternately, you have to rewrite in a programming language that actually supports flock(2) directly, such as Perl.

share|improve this answer
    
Linux's flock(1) isn't a trivial wrapper around flock(2). –  Gilles May 13 '12 at 15:18
    
Do I understand it right? The lock is only kept as long as the process is running. So, a simple wrapper around flock(2) would keep the lock only a slong as it is running. In a script the lock would be released before the next command is called, right? –  jboi Dec 22 '13 at 10:31
    
@jboi - the flock(1) command either takes a shell command (which is run while holding the lock) or the number of a file descriptor which should be locked - in the latter case the file descriptor is opened in the caller (if it is a shell script, using exec 9>$LOCKFILE or similar) and remains open after the flock command exits. As for @tchrist's claim that you cannot write a shell level flock - well, I'd believe (almost) anything he says about Perl, but on this one he's wrong. The flock command runs the locked commands (if passed a filename) or is passed a file descriptor number - it works! –  Alex Dupuy Apr 7 at 9:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.