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I am working on a cancer database and I have one column with the date of a patient's local recurrence (if they had one), and another column with the date of a patient's distant recurrence (if they had one). I want to create another column that consists of the date of FIRST recurrence, regardless of whether it was local or distant. I'm not sure how to proceed because some patients only had local or only had distant, and thus many fields are "NULL". Here's an example of what I'm looking to do:

Date_Local     Date_Distant     Date_Any
2010-08-01     2009-05-25       2009-05-25
NULL           2001-01-07       2001-01-07
1999-12-12     NULL             1999-12-12
NULL           NULL             NULL
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming your already added the column with an ALTER TABLE statement, you would populate it using a CASE statement in the UPDATE query like:

ALTER TABLE cancertable ADD Date_Any DATE AFTER Date_Distant;

UPDATE cancertable SET Date_Any = 
  CASE
    WHEN Date_Local IS NOT NULL AND Date_Local <= Date_Distant THEN Date_Local
    WHEN Date_Distant IS NOT NULL AND Date_Distant < Date_Local THEN Date_Distant
    ELSE NULL
  END

The above statement will update all rows since it has no WHERE clause. Before doing the UPDATE, test it out with a SELECT to make sure it looks like you expect:

SELECT *,
  CASE
    WHEN Date_Local IS NOT NULL AND Date_Local <= Date_Distant THEN Date_Local
    WHEN Date_Distant IS NOT NULL AND Date_Distant < Date_Local THEN Date_Distant
    ELSE NULL
  END AS Date_Any
FROM cancertable

Consider, however, whether you really even need another column added though. Depending on how often you intend to query this, you might just create a view using the SELECT statement above instead, so the Date_Any value will be "live".

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Hi Michael, thanks for your response. Your code works for the patients that have BOTH a local recurrence AND a distant recurrence, but some patients only have one or the other. For the patients that only have local or only have distant, the value in Date_Any is NULL. I want to have the Date_Any value equal to whichever type of recurrence they had. I hope that makes sense. How would I handle the situation where some patients have a NULL value for one of either local or distant? Thanks! – vokey588 May 10 '12 at 13:04
    
@user1385991 See changes above adding NOT NULL checks. – Michael Berkowski May 10 '12 at 13:32

Adding a new column with this computed date might not be the best of ideas. Because you will be computing the value based off a snapshot (point in time). But if either of the source dates changes then the computed value can be rendered invalid.

If you do decide to add this extra computed column then I strongly advice you keep it up to date via insert and update triggers. But it would be much better to handle this logic in your application layer. You can easily query for the inferred recurrence date with the following query:

SELECT LEAST(COALESCE(Date_Local, Date_Distant), COALESCE(Date_Distant, Date_Local))
FROM TableNameHere WHERE where-clause-here;
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