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I work on an enterprise system that utilizes effective dated joins. I am trying to figure out how to document the joins between the tables to assist me with my queries. As far as I can tell this information does not exist in the index or constraint information on the tables. Which database document or tool would be best suited for recording this information?

An example of a join would be:

Table_A
Key_ID - Primary Key
Employee_ID
Position_ID
Effective_DT
Unique Key -> Employee_ID, Position_ID, Effective_DT

Table_B
Employee_ID
Position_ID
Effective_DT
Table_A_Key_ID
Unique Key -> Employee_ID, Position_ID, Effective_DT

Table_A_Key_ID is a foreign key from Table_A and cannot be null. In other words, every record in Table_B requires a corresponding record in Table_A but the reverse is not true. To determine the record in Table_B that relates to a record in Table_A that does not have a corresponding record you need to grab the highest effective dated record less than Table_A.Effective_DT.

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Diagram tools do not document joins, but tables (entities), and relationships between them. For your example, simply create a view -- this will "encapsulate" your join into a DB object. Alos take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/10521401/… –  Damir Sudarevic May 10 '12 at 12:06
    
Thanks for the correction. To clarify my main purpose with the documentation is to speed up my transition from one part of the system to another. For example, I may be working on the employee tables for a couple of months and suddenly get a request for the qualifications portion of the database that is set up quite differently. Up till now it took me at least a half day or so just to switch gears depending on how well written the specs were. How do you document your joins? BTW, how did you create that diagram for the execution plan in your other post? –  tp9 May 10 '12 at 19:31
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The diagrams are ERD's, Entity Relationship Diagrams like I mention below. They are made using tools like I have mentioned below. Those tools also allow you to document how tables are joined (that is what the relations between tables are). They show the cardinality and which are the parent tables and which have the foreign keys etc. The other diagrams he look like what some databases provide when they show 'explain plans'. So if what you mean by document joins is "understand how the tables are related" ERD Diagram Tools, which is what he used to make the diagrams is what you are looking for. –  BillR May 10 '12 at 22:24
    
@BillR Thanks for the clarification. I have the free version of Toad so I'll take a look. –  tp9 May 10 '12 at 23:00
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@tp9; DB GUI does that. Google oracle graphical explain plan. –  Damir Sudarevic May 11 '12 at 15:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

An ER modelling tool will document referential integrity, but will not by itself help you document all the JOINs that you do in your client code (that might not all "lie" on top of FKs).

Either always do the JOINing through views (which ER tool should help you document), or you'd need to have a separate documentation just for JOINs. This can be a separate document or embedded in the source-level documentation (near the code that actually initiates the JOINs). Prefer the second option since people maintaining the code will be more likely to update the documentation as they update the code and make changes to JOINs.

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  • toad data modeler
  • erWin
  • Embarcadero

If you are working in an Enterprise and they are willing to fork over the cash for some real tools. Otherwise use a combination of Visio for the ER Diagram and MS Word for the Data Dictionary. And in all cases a healthy amount of elbow grease.

Pictures are worth a thousand words... but you need to learn how to draw the right pictures.

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