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 int test_malloc(void **ptr, size_t size)
 {
    (*ptr) = malloc(size);
    return 0;
 }

 int test_app()
 {
   char *data = NULL;
   int ret = 0;
   ret = test_malloc((void **)&data, 100);
 }

Compiler: gcc 4.1.2

Among others, I am using -O2 & -Wall which are I think are turning on some options which checks for this.

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Also, don't write interfaces such as test_app. It is supposed to return an int and you don't return one, and to receive an unspecific number of arguments where it doesn't receive any. gcc should have told you for the return value. –  Jens Gustedt May 10 '12 at 6:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have a variable of type char*, and in test_malloc you are modifying it through an lvalue of type void *, which breaks strict aliasing rules.

You could solve it like this:

 int test_app()
 {
   char *data = NULL;
   void *void_data = NULL;
   int ret = 0;
   ret = test_malloc(&void_data, 100);
   data = (char*)void_data;
 }

But even better is to make test_malloc return void* to avoid problems like this.

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+1 for showing how ugly your code has to be to work with an ugly API like this. –  R.. May 10 '12 at 6:12

You cannot do what you're trying to do in C; it's invalid code. If you want to use void * to return generic pointers, the only way to do so is the return value. This is because void * converts to any pointer type, and any pointer type converts to void *, but void ** does not convert to a pointer to some other type of pointer, nor do pointers to other pointer types convert to void **.

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And I forget: does the standard even guarantee that char* and void* have the same object representation? Supposing the representations were different, then even if the conversion were allowed and didn't get trashed by the optimizer because of the strict aliasing violation, the code certainly wouldn't work since reinterpreting the void* written by test_malloc as a char* would give the wrong address. –  Steve Jessop May 10 '12 at 9:05
    
Actually I believe they are required to have the same representation because void * is essentially specified as a copy of char * with extra automatic conversions but no dereferencing or arithmetic. Might want to check to be sure though. I think it's still an aliasing violation to access it that way, though. –  R.. May 10 '12 at 13:58
    
Yes, I agree that the aliasing violation is already a show-stopper. I was trying to pile on motivations for that. Not that GCC actually does use different representations for different object pointer types anywhere AFAIK, but the standard allows for peculiar architectures. If it wasn't char* but int* then there might even be a historical example. –  Steve Jessop May 10 '12 at 14:03

I try like this one works fine

void * test_malloc(int size)
{
    void *mem = malloc(size);
    if (mem == NULL)
    {
        printf("ERROR: test_malloc %d\n", size);
    }
    return mem;
}

 int test_app()
 {
   char *data;
   int ret = 0;
   data = test_malloc(100);

   if(data != NULL)
         free(data);
 }
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