Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running into some confusing behaviour from LinkedHashMap in grails 2.0.3. Running the following script in grails console:

def m = ["smart-1":[stuff:'asdf']]
println m.getClass()

def p = [id:1]
println m."smart-$p.id"
println m["smart-$p.id"]
println m.get("smart-$p.id")

println m.'smart-1'
println m['smart-1']
println m.get('smart-1')

gives the output:

class java.util.LinkedHashMap
[stuff:asdf]
[stuff:asdf]
null
[stuff:asdf]
[stuff:asdf]
[stuff:asdf]

In an integration test, I'm seeing the opposite behaviour - I can only get the content of the HashMap using m.get(GStringImpl) (as opposed m.get(String)).

Is this behaviour expected or known?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

First: don't use GStrings in your hashmap keys. Ever. You will almost always have an issue retrieving the item, because a GString is not a String (red box on that page), and does not have the same hash value. Instead, use one of these options:

def key = 'key'
['key': value]
[(key): value]
[("some $key".toString()): value]

This ensures that you will always get the result when using a String. (So, for lookups, always use a String, too.)

I'm not 100% sure why you are seeing the odd behavior, but I have a solid guess. The get() method is a Java method, while the array-style (and probably property-style) lookup is implemented using getAt(), which is a Groovy (GDK) method. My guess is that the Groovy method is aware of GStrings, and silently handles the conversion to make sure you don't get tripped up.

The simplest solution is to always use getAt(), not get:

def m = ['smart-1':[stuff:'asdf']]
println m.getClass()

def p = [id:1]
println m."smart-$p.id"
println m["smart-$p.id"]
println m.getAt("smart-$p.id")

println m.'smart-1'
println m['smart-1']
println m.getAt('smart-1')

Which works fine.

The better solution is to ensure that you are using Strings when looking up values, like so:

println m.get("smart-$p.id".toString())

Which also works. I like this method better, because when calling the method directly, it's clearer that your key is a String. I'd still use the normal GString when using the array-style or property-style accessors, because that's standard Groovy syntax.


In an integration test, I'm seeing the opposite behaviour - I can only get the content of the HashMap using m.get(GStringImpl) (as opposed m.get(String)).

This is most likely because your key in your hashmap is staying a GString.

If a GString does not have any variables, the Groovy compiler silently converts it to a String literal (better performance), which is why the above example is actually using a String as the key, but the lookup is using a GString.

e.g.

"Hello $name" -> GString('Hello $name')
"Hello Bob"   -> 'Hello Bob'

A final thought: As long as you are in groovy, don't use get(), since Groovy provides the much cleaner [] and property syntaxes.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For the final thought :). I'd also like to note that map['key'] and map.key are just syntax sugar for map.getAt(key); and yeah, i'd recommend always using those two former options if possible. –  epidemian May 10 '12 at 6:30
    
Thanks for such a comprehensive answer. –  Alex May 10 '12 at 6:43
    
As suspected, map keys in my app were GStrings. Have added .toString() calls and now maps are behaving as expected. Thanks :¬) –  Alex May 10 '12 at 7:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.