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I have an interface (say Employee) which has 2 classes that implements it (say Assistant and Manager). I also have an interface which has a method that returns a list of the first interface type (say EmployeeLogic interface which returns List. There are two classes implementing this interface (say AssistantLogic and ManagerLogic). In these two classes, the List contains only Assistants (in the AssitantLogic) and only Manager (in the ManagerLogic).

The problem is that I want to sort these two lists based on the methods that exist only in the subclasses. How do I write such a comparator?

Probably the code is better understandable:

public interface Employee {
    public int employeeMethod();
}

public class Manager implements Employee {
    public int employeeMehod(){//[...]}
    public int managerMethod(){//[...]}
}

public class Assistant implements Employee {
    public int employeeMehod(){//[...]}
    public String assistantMehod(){//[...]}
}

public interface EmployeeLogic() {
    public List<Employee> getEmployees();
}

public class ManagerLogic implements EmployeeLogic {
    public List<Employee> getEmployees() {

        List<Employee> employees = [...] //or List<? extends Employee> ?
        [...]
        Collections.sort(employees, new Comparator<Manager>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(Manager o1, Manager o2) {
                return o1.managerMethod().compareTo(o2.managerMethod());
            }
        });
        return employees;
    }

}

public class AssistantLogic implements EmployeeLogic {
    public List<Employee> getEmployees() {

        List<Employee> employees = [...] //or List<? extends Employee> ?
        [...]
        Collections.sort(employees, new Comparator<Assistant>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(Assistant o1, Assistant o2) {
                return o1.assistantMehod().compareTo(o2.assistantMehod());
            }
        });
    return employees;
    }
}

Is there a way to write such a comparator?

I know a workaround (see bellow) but is the above thing possible with only one list?

public class ManagerLogic implements EmployeeLogic {
        public List<Employee> getEmployees() {

            List<Manager> managers = new ArrayList<Manager>()
            [...]
            Collections.sort(managers, new Comparator<Manager>() {
                @Override
                public int compare(Manager o1, Manager o2) {
                    return o1.managerMethod().compareTo(o2.managerMethod());
                }
            });
            List<Employee> employees = new ArrayList<Employee>();
            employees.addAll(managers);
            return employees;
        }

    }
share|improve this question
1  
How would you expect non-managers to be ordered in the first approach? –  Jon Skeet May 10 '12 at 6:13
    
Assistants are to be sorted on the method specific only to the Assistant class. –  m3th0dman May 10 '12 at 6:19
    
If you dont need sorting in multiple Ways, you can extend the Comparable interface in Employee and then implement in specific manner in both Manager and Assistant classes, is there something that stops you from that ? –  Akash Yadav May 10 '12 at 6:24
    
I have forgot to mention; I did not write Employee and Assistant classes and have no access to their code. –  m3th0dman May 10 '12 at 6:27
    
@m3th0dman: But your comparator doesn't specify anything about assistants... –  Jon Skeet May 10 '12 at 7:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand you correctly, your problem isn't about trying to sort a mix of Assistants and Managers, but about the fact that you can only sort either a list of Assistants or a list of Managers, but you want to return a list of Employees.

In that case, one thing you could do is have getEmployees() return a List<? extends Employee>. If that is not an option, and if you don't intend for the returned list to be modified, you can do return Collections.unmodifiableList(managers). If you intend the returned list to be modifiable, then your solution is the cleanest way to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks; I looked at the problem in the opposite way - trying to add bounded wildcard to the list that I was to sort and not to change the return type of the method. –  m3th0dman May 10 '12 at 7:30
    
Another trick that apparently works is Arrays.asList( managers.toArray( new Employee[ managers.size() ] ) ); but that's a little sketchy to me... –  trutheality May 10 '12 at 7:35

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