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I am trying out some examples from Beginning Java EE6 with GlassFish3 .So , i created an entity class that basically looks like this ...

@Entity
@Table(name="Book")
public class Book implements Serializable
{
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private long id;
    @Column(nullable=false)
    private String name;
    @Column(nullable=false)
    private String isbn;
    private String description;

    public Book()
    {
        // Empty constructor to facilitate construction. 
        System.out.println("The variables have not been initialized...Please initialize them using the Setters or use the provided constructor");
    }

    public Book(String name, String isbn, String description) {
        this.name = name;
        this.isbn = isbn;
        this.description = description;
    }

    public String getIsbn() {
        return isbn;
    }

    public void setIsbn(String isbn) {
        this.isbn = isbn;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getDescription() {
        return description;
    }

    public void setDescription(String description) {
        this.description = description;
    }


    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return this.name + " - " + this.isbn; 
    }

    @PrePersist
    public void printPrePersist(){
        System.out.println("Persisting the book "+this.name);
    }
    @PostPersist
    public void printPostPersist(){
        System.out.println("Persisted the book "+this.name);
    }

}

and i tried to persist it like this ...

public class MainClass 
{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Book book = new Book("Effective Java","ISBN - 1234415","A very good book on Java");
        Book book2 = new Book("Learning Java EE","ISBN - 1233415","A good book for Java EE beginners");

        // These are the necessary classes
        EntityManagerFactory emf = Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("PersistenceAppPU");
        EntityManager em = emf.createEntityManager();

        // Persist the book here
        EntityTransaction etx = em.getTransaction();
        etx.begin();
        em.persist(book);
        em.persist(book2);
        etx.commit();

        em.close();
        emf.close();

        System.out.println("The two books have been persisted");
    }
}

It persists , but when i run , i see an output like ...

The variables have not been initialized...Please initialize them using the Setters or use the provided constructor
Persisting the book Effective Java
The variables have not been initialized...Please initialize them using the Setters or use the provided constructor
Persisting the book Learning Java EE
Persisted the book Learning Java EE
Persisted the book Effective Java
The variables have not been initialized...Please initialize them using the Setters or use the provided constructor
The variables have not been initialized...Please initialize them using the Setters or use the provided constructor
The variables have not been initialized...Please initialize them using the Setters or use the provided constructor
The variables have not been initialized...Please initialize them using the Setters or use the provided constructor
[EL Info]: 2012-05-10 12:01:19.623--ServerSession(17395905)--file:/C:/Users/raviteja.s/Documents/NetBeansProjects/PersistenceApp/src/_PersistenceAppPU logout successful
The two books have been persisted

I dont understand , why there are so many default constructor calls when , there is not one made by me ... ?

Could somebody explain me how the flow is in the sample that i have ?

share|improve this question
    
Seems Like the EntityManager is Creating new Book Objects using the Default Constructor. If you throw a exception at the default constructor you can see the whole Stack that is calling the constructor (or use a Debugger) just add try{ throw new Exception(); }catch(Exception e){e.printStackTrace();} To your constructor and Run it again – outofBounds May 10 '12 at 7:00
1  
@outofBounds Or you could just use the static Thread.dumpStack() – yshavit May 10 '12 at 7:06
    
@yshavit thx did'n know this. its mutch easier and cleaner – outofBounds Jun 12 '12 at 14:52

JPA uses a constructor with no arguments in order to instantiate your Entities, and then bind fields in those entities to the correspondent mapped tables and columns.

Those output you see are the calls that JPA does for you every time it manipulates your entities.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain why there are only 4 prints at the end instead of 6 or 8 .. there are 3 fields and one identity. Could you please elaborate at what points are the constructors invoked.. – Flash May 10 '12 at 8:00
    
I'm sorry but I don't remember exactly the flow used in JPA :) if you're interested you should use Thread.dumpStack() as suggested by yshavit. But note that the prints are used in the constructor, not in getters/setters of the fields... Since there are 2 Books, I may think that the constructor of each entity is invoked twice by JPA. – javatutorial May 10 '12 at 8:17

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