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I am having a problem with the VB code Int(Rnd() * 75) + 75) conveting it to C#. I have tried

Random random = new Random
random.Next( 75 ) + 75

But its isnt right. Please Help me.

Thanks

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what is the intent? do you want between 75, 150 or something else –  Tilak May 10 '12 at 7:12
    
I actually have no idea how the VB code works, ive got to translate the VB code to C#, but when i use the code that ive tried it randoms numbers in the thousands. –  Sigh-AniDe May 10 '12 at 7:16
1  
Jon skeet answer is correct. CInt(Int((upperbound - lowerbound + 1) * Rnd() + lowerbound)) in VB translate to rand.Next(lowerbound,upperbound) in c#. (From documentation of Rnd() –  Tilak May 10 '12 at 7:25
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Assuming that's meant to give a value between 75 (inclusive) and 150 (exclusive) I'd use

Random random = new Random();
int value = random.Next(75, 150);

That's clearer than first generating a number in the range [0, 75) and then adding 75, IMO.

Note, however, that you shouldn't be creating a new instance of Random every time you want a random number. You probably want one instance per thread. I have a reasonably long article explaining the various pitfalls in generating random numbers, and some workarounds.

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yes but Int(Rnd() * 75) + 75) will generate another numbers –  Likurg May 10 '12 at 7:16
    
+1 for the link. May i know why Guid.NewGuid cannot be used to generate random numbers (apart from performance issues) –  Tilak May 10 '12 at 7:16
    
What is the default range that the VB Rnd() uses? –  Sigh-AniDe May 10 '12 at 7:17
    
@Tilak: See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2012/04/30/… for Eric Lippert's explanation of GUIDs and randomness. –  Jon Skeet May 10 '12 at 7:22
2  
@Sigh-AniDe: I just did a search for "vb rnd function" and found this documentation which states that it's greater than or equal to 0, but less than 1. You could have done the same search :) –  Jon Skeet May 10 '12 at 7:22
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See your code in VB is doing

  1. Generate a random number.
  2. Multiply it with 75 and convert it into int.
  3. Then add 75 in it.

In C# its like

Random random = new Random();
int v = random.Next() * 75 + 75;

No conversion required because random.Next() gives an integer. More over you can limit your random number generation by providing min and max value b/w which to find out like this:

random.Next(50, 100);

where it will only find random number b/w 50 and 100.

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2  
Next returns an integer so you would never get anything different from the calculation, meaning your convert is pointless. –  Ash Burlaczenko May 10 '12 at 7:13
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Why do you use Convert? –  Likurg May 10 '12 at 7:14
    
@Likur and Ash : Thanks and Corrected –  Nikhil Agrawal May 10 '12 at 7:17
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I think it like this

        Random random = new Random();
        int rdnum = (random.Next() + 1) * 75;

EDIT

At last if i need his random i will use this (0-20 for smaller numbers)

        int rdnum = ((new Random()).Next(0, 20) + 1) * 75;

EDIT2

After comment of Deanna, code will be

        Random random = new Random();
        Double rdnum = (random.NextDouble() * 75) + 75;
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and what made you infer that code.? –  Nikhil Agrawal May 10 '12 at 7:17
    
what is the use of +1 –  Tilak May 10 '12 at 7:18
    
In begin he asked Int(Rnd() * 75) + 75) so numbers can be 75, 150, 225 etc. I agree with @NikhilAgrawal's Answer but imho my code more nice to use. –  Likurg May 10 '12 at 7:21
    
But as i said, @NikhilAgrawal's answer is best suits the question –  Likurg May 10 '12 at 7:29
    
@likurg: VB6's Rnd() returns a float between 0 and 1, not an integer. –  Deanna May 10 '12 at 10:49
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