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Could you say me what mistake I'm doing here? When I set url = NULL then compare whether it has NULL whether by if(strlen(url)!=0) or by if(url!=NULL) the program crashes or breaks up. I know it's very a simple thing but I'm doing something wrong.

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void main()
{
    char* url="/v1.0/fafffsdf"  ;
    url=NULL;
    printf("%s\n",url);
    if(url!=0)
    {
        printf("It ain't NULL\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("It's NULL\n");
    }
}
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2  
Are you getting confused between the NULL character which is \0 and NULL which indicates a NULL pointer? –  Nick May 10 '12 at 7:16
    
A minor nit, the null character when abbreviated is NUL with one L. Which I presume is handy to avoid confusion with the NULL macro. I'm not sure which came first (ASCII 1963, C 1972...I guess I have my answer). And I'm not sure which is more or less confusing. –  user7116 May 10 '12 at 14:41
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1 Answer

The crash is in

printf("%s\n",url);

The pointer is pointing to NULL and you are trying to read from there, effectively dereferencing a NULL pointer which will generate a segmentation fault.

Pointing to an empty string like

char *url = "";

is OK and quite different from pointing to a NULL location like

char *url =NULL;

which is dangerous if dereferenced.

An empty string has a valid location in memory and can be dereferenced. Its just that it has nothing in it expect a \0.

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For preference I'd say "empty string" rather than "null string". Calling different things by the name "null" is what causes this confusion in the first place. –  Steve Jessop May 10 '12 at 9:00
    
@SteveJessop hmm... You are right. Corrected. Thanks :) –  Pavan Manjunath May 10 '12 at 9:01
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