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I'm new to python, and I'm building a game to teach myself python. This game will have a number of lessons, with questions and answers; the user will gain and lose points depending on the validity of their answers.

I'm using dictionaries to store the questions and answers that will be asked in each lesson.

I want to display and check the keys and values of the dictionary only at specific points (e.g. after the user enters a command). To do this, I imagined that I could create functions containing the dictionaries and then pass them to a main function when needed.

But when I run the code below, I get the following error: AttributeError: 'function' object has no attribute 'iteritems'

So I have two questions:

  1. I tried removing the dictionary from within a function, and it works just fine then. Is there any way (or reason) to make it work within a function?
  2. Is it possible to use just one dictionary and check the keys and values of a section of it at certain points?

Here's my code so far. Any advice whatsoever would be much appreciated!

points = 10 # user begins game with 10 pts 

def point_system(): 
    global points

    #help user track points
    if 5 >= points: 
        print "Careful. You have %d points left." % points 
    elif points == 0: 
        dead("You've lost all your points. Please start over.")
    else:
        print "Good job. Spend your points wisely." 

def lesson1(): 
    #create a dictionary 
    mydict = {
    "q1":"a1", 
    "q2":"a2"
    }

return mydict

def main(lesson):
    global points

    #get key:value pair from dictionary
    for k, v in lesson.iteritems():
        lesson.get(k,v) # Is the .get step necessary? It works perfectly well without it.
        print k
        user_answer = raw_input("What's your answer?: ") 

#test if user_answer == value in dictionary, and award points accordingly 
        if user_answer == v:
            user_answer = True
            points += 1 #increase points by 1 
            print "Congrats, you gained a point! You now have %d points" % points 
            point_system()
        elif user_answer != v: 
            points -= 1 #decrease points by 1 
            print "Oops, you lost a point. You now have %d points" % points 
            point_system()
        else: 
            print "Something went wrong."
            point_system()


main(lesson1) 

and the code that works:

points = 10 # user begins game with 10 pts 

#create a dictionary 
lesson1 = {
"q1":"a1", 
"q2":"a2"
}

def point_system(): 
    global points

    #help user track points
    if 5 >= points: 
    print "Careful. You have %d points left." % points 
    elif points == 0: 
    dead("You've lost all your points. Please start over.")
    else:
    print "Good job. Spend your points wisely." 

def main(lesson):
    global points

    #get key:value pair from dictionary
    for k, v in lesson.iteritems():
        lesson.get(k,v) # Is the .get step necessary? It works perfectly well without it.
        print k
        user_answer = raw_input("What's your answer?: ") 

#test if user_answer == value in dictionary, and award points accordingly 
        if user_answer == v:
            user_answer = True
            points += 1 #increase points by 1 
            print "Congrats, you gained a point! You now have %d points" % points 
            point_system()
        elif user_answer != v: 
            points -= 1 #decrease points by 1 
            print "Oops, you lost a point. You now have %d points" % points 
            point_system()
        else: 
            print "Something went wrong."
            point_system()


main(lesson1) 
share|improve this question
2  
I think you need to try OOP approach here. –  DrTyrsa May 10 '12 at 7:44
2  
Just curious...are you a javascript programmer? –  parselmouth May 10 '12 at 7:49
    
Thank you for the reference, @DrTyrsa. –  user1186742 May 10 '12 at 10:15
    
@parselmouth, yeah, I started with javascript -- why? –  user1186742 May 10 '12 at 10:18
    
@user1186742 your lesson1() function is sort-a-kinda like a javascript factory function for producing a new object. I thought I would ask about your javascript experience in that knowing that you are coming from a javascript background, those of us with knowledge of both javascript and python can better show you how python does certain things differently and why. Anyway - welcome to the python community! Python is an amazing language and I hope that you'll find that you like using it and are very productive with it. –  parselmouth May 10 '12 at 16:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're calling main() with the lesson1 function and not the result of the lesson1 function (which is a directory).

You should write:

main(lesson1())

By the way, lesson1 must also return the created directory for this to work:

def lesson1(): 
    #create a dictionary 
    mydict = {
        "q1":"a1", 
        "q2":"a2"
    }
    return mydict
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That makes sense and worked perfectly. –  user1186742 May 10 '12 at 10:21
    
Is it best practice to place the dictionary within a function, or would it be equally okay if I left it outside? –  user1186742 May 10 '12 at 10:22

You passed a function that returns a dictionary so you should call the function first to get the dictionary. So you may modify your code so that main accepts dictionary (the code actually expects a dictionary):

main(lesson1())

If you really would like to pass a function then you should modify you main to execute function first to get the dictionary:

def main(lessonFunc):
    global points
    lesson = lessonFunc()

    #get key:value pair from dictionary
    for k, v in lesson.iteritems():

but the first option is probably better. You could also pack a lesson into an object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for explaining. What are the advantages of packing a lesson into an object? –  user1186742 May 10 '12 at 10:24
    
With this small code it might not be necessary. The Lesson object could have more things than just questions. Like lesson title, some information about literature etc. This might make code much clearer. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming –  uhz May 10 '12 at 11:49

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