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What is the scope of $1 through $9 in Perl? For instance, in this code:

sub bla {
    my $x = shift;
    $x =~ s/(\d*)/$1 $1/;
    return $x;    
}

my $y;

# some code that manipulates $y

$y =~ /(\w*)\s+(\w*)/;

my $z = &bla($2);
my $w = $1;

print "$1 $2\n";

What will $1 be? Will it be the first \w* from $x or the first \d* from the second \w* in $x?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

from perldoc perlre

The numbered match variables ($1, $2, $3, etc.) and the related punctuation set ($+ , $& , $` , $' , and $^N ) are all dynamically scoped until the end of the enclosing block or until the next successful match, whichever comes first. (See ""Compound Statements"" in perlsyn.)

This means that the first time you run a regex or substitution in a scope a new localized copy is created. The original value is restored (à la local) when the scope ends. So, $1 will be 10 up until the regex is run, 20 after the regex, and 10 again when the subroutine is finished.

But I don't use regex variables outside of substitutions. I find much clearer to say things like

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

sub bla {
    my $x = shift;
    $x =~ s/(\d*)/$1 $1/;
    return $x;    
}

my $y = "10 20";

my ($first, $second) = $y =~ /(\w*)\s+(\w*)/;

my $z = &bla($second);
my $w = $first;

print "$first $second\n";

where $first and $second have better names that describe their contents.

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I don't understand the documentation you quoted. Maybe I'm unclear on the implications of "dynamically scoped." So what is the answer to the question? –  Rob Kennedy Jun 27 '09 at 15:22
    
See perl.plover.com/FAQs/Namespaces.html –  Sinan Ünür Jun 27 '09 at 15:46
    
@Rob Kennedy I have clarified what dynamic scoping means. You might also want to look at perldoc.perl.org/… –  Chas. Owens Jun 27 '09 at 15:47
    
The term "dynamic scope" seems only to be defined in terms of what "local" does, but since "local" isn't used in regex matches, it's a little harder to see that it's in effect. Thanks for clarifying. Sinan, your linked page doesn't actually contain the word "dynamic," so it's not much help. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 27 '09 at 17:14
    
@ Rob: I believe that the connection is that Perl's local creates dynamic scope. See the follow-up to the article Sinan posted, especially here: perl.plover.com/local.html#5_Dynamic_Scope –  Telemachus Jun 27 '09 at 17:17

By making a couple of small alterations to your example code:

sub bla {
    my $x = shift;
    print "$1\n";
    $x =~ s/(\d+)/$1 $1/;
    return $x;
}
my $y = "hello world9";

# some code that manipulates $y

$y =~ /(\w*)\s+(\w*)/;

my $z = &bla($2);
my $w = $1;

print "$1 $2\n$z\n";

we get the following output:

hello
hello world9
world9 9

showing that the $1 is limited to the dynamic scope (ie the $1 assigned within bla ceases to exist at the end of that function (but the $1 assigned from the $y regex is accessible within bla until it is overwritten))

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3  
More importantly, I think, it shows that $1 outside of bla is not affected by what happens inside of bla. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 27 '09 at 15:40

The variables will be valid until the next time they are written to in the flow of execution.

But really, you should be using something like:

my ($match1, match2) = $var =~ /(\d+)\D(\d+)/;

Then use $match1 and $match2 instead of $1 and $2, it's much less ambiguous.

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